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Safe to use ATX PSU on a motherboard with an EATX power connector?

By Dalton
May 21, 2012
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  1. HI, I was wondering if it is safe to use an atx psu on a motherboard with an eatx power connector. The motherboard has a 24-pin eatx and a 4-pin atx 12v connector. I bought the motherboard and started using an atx psu and everything seems to work ok then realized after it was an eatx power connector on the motherboard. Are there eatx psu's? Thanks
  2. dmill89

    dmill89 TS Guru Posts: 737

    EATX is a form factor (12"x13") not a power connector. I'm assuming you are talking about using a PSU with a 20 pin (old ATX) connector with a newer motherboard that has a 24 pin (current ATX) connector. If that is the case you will need to consult your motherboard's manual. Some 24 pin boards run fine with only 20 pins some don't. The issue is that each pin in only rated to carry a certain amount of current (Amps). If you overload one of these pins your risk burning or melting the ATX connector on either the PSU, Motherboard, or both.
  3. Tabbywabby

    Tabbywabby TS Member Posts: 29

    I have never heard of a eATX PSU. Newegg hasn't either. I think your referring to the difference in number of connectors in your primary Mobo connector then the number of pins in your CPU power connector. There is no difference and what you refer to as eATX is likely what other people refer to as, 20+4 pin connectors there is a 20 pin primary connector then there is a sub 4 pin connector for those that need it.


    If I'm right your primary mobo connector (24-pin eatx) should look like this
    [​IMG]

    And your 4-pin atx 12v like this
    [​IMG]
  4. Dalton

    Dalton Topic Starter

    Well it says it is an eatx connector right beside the 24-pin connector but I never heard of it before so I wasn't sure. The psu has the 24-pin connection, that I know already but wasn't sure about the eatx. The form factor even on the site of the manufacturer says uatx which is microatx and it says the 24-pin connector on the motherboard is eatx. Never seen that before on a motherboard.
  5. Dalton

    Dalton Topic Starter

    Ok I think I understand that now because when I was looking up info on eatx it said it stood for extended atx, thus the 20-pin + 4-pin for newer motherboards. I already knew about the 20-pin + 4-pin because some motherboards I have are 20-pin atx and some are 24-pin atx but now I know what that means by the "e"atx and the other 24-pin motherboards I have never said eatx beside the connector, just atx so maybe the newer boards say that now or something. Just had to understand the e part. I understand it fully now. Thanks for the replies!
  6. dmill89

    dmill89 TS Guru Posts: 737


    The eATX (extended ATX) has nothing to do with the connector. It refers to the physical dimensions of the board. An EATX board is slightly wider than a standard ATX board and thus requires a case big enough to accommodate it (most modern mid and full towers can accommodate eATX). 20 and 24 pin are a completely separate specification that came about from increased current draw of newer components. Small mATX boards can have a 24 pin connector and there are older eATX boards that only have a 20 pin connector.
  7. Dalton

    Dalton Topic Starter

    Oh ok, I think I know what you mean now, I was thinking it might just be referring to the motherboard itself but I was thrown off by the eatx beside the connector. So when it says 24-pin eatx power connector on the site it must be referring to the 24-pin connector from the psu not stating that the connector itself is eatx? So that means it is a uatx form factor but also can be called eatx form factor?
  8. Tabbywabby

    Tabbywabby TS Member Posts: 29

    No, and the form factor you are mentioning is µATX which also means MicroATX. eATX is a VERY different form factor from µATX (microATX) I would personally just disregard what it says on the mobo, often times manufactures use componets interchangeably between different mobos they produce. As long as everything is working fine and you aren't having any power related issues then you should be fine. So don't worry, if you want you can post some pics and we can confirm that your connections are good.
  9. dmill89

    dmill89 TS Guru Posts: 737


    Again eATX, uATX, etc. are physical form factors (relating to the physical dimensions of the board in inches or mm) have nothing to do with the connector. uATX and eATX are at completely different ends of the spectrum. uATX (micro ATX) is smaller than standard ATX, where as eATX (extended ATX) is larger than standard ATX. As Tabbywabby said components on motherboards are often shared between different models so the eATX stamping might be meaningless in this case. Either way if you have a 24 pin connection on the motherboard and a 24 pin connector from the PSU you are ok.
  10. Dalton

    Dalton Topic Starter

    Ok, I knew uatx was microatx so eatx is just referring to the size of the motherboard? Hope I got it right this time. I know I got everything hooked up right but I will still upload a couple pics to show you. I was just wondering about the eatx. I guess there more than a few sizes aren't there?
  11. Dalton

    Dalton Topic Starter

    Here are the pics.

    Attached Files:

     
  12. Tabbywabby

    Tabbywabby TS Member Posts: 29

    There are 3 major sizes of current ATX motherboards, microATX, ATX / Standard ATX, and eATX / extended ATX. They go in order from smallest to largest. MicroATX is often used for smaller cases, or media computers, however there are some high end boards that are very good for things like gaming. ATX is the standard sized board and this category encompases everything from useless to SUPER high end. eATX is usually reserved for the high end motherboards for enthusiasts that want to do crazy stuff with their computer.

    And your pics, everything looks like it should. You can relax there is nothing wrong.
  13. dmill89

    dmill89 TS Guru Posts: 737

    Yes EATX refers to the size, again this board may be mismarked but it really doesn't matter so long as it fits your case.

    Also from the pics everything is connected correctly so you don't have anything to worry about there.
  14. Dalton

    Dalton Topic Starter

    I seen other sizes of boards but never seen the name eatx before today and the site seemed to be saying different or I misinterpreted it but it's all clear now. Thanks for helping me understand the eatx!
  15. Dalton

    Dalton Topic Starter

    I fell like an ***** I thought I knew what it was exactly, I should think before I speak but I guess it's a little to late for that now.
  16. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 5,981   +1,488

    Read what Wikipedia has on the subject.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATX
  17. Dalton

    Dalton Topic Starter

    Thanks but I got it all figured out now, just that I thought I knew what eatx was before and I spoke to soon but it's all cleared up now.
  18. Tabbywabby

    Tabbywabby TS Member Posts: 29

    Clarifying things like that is what a support forum is for.
  19. Dalton

    Dalton Topic Starter

    For sure, thanks again!
  20. OllieArmageddon

    OllieArmageddon TS Rookie

    Hello there, I came across this via a google search of 'eatx' As the ASUS Crosshair V Formula motherboard claims it uses a 'EATX' 24pin power connector. I know what you guys have been saying about motherboard form factor, but I believe you to be incorrect in this case. I know it means Extended ATX, but motherboard manufacturers use 'EATX Power connector' as terminology for 24pin power connectors. the ASUS site actually quotes this ''
    1 x 24-pin EATX Power connector(s)''
    In quite a few of its motherboard specifications.

    I only joined 5 mins ago to post this reply encase someone else finds their way here via google. Hope I can post links as a 'newbie'

    Source: http://uk.asus.com/Motherboards/AMD_AM3Plus/Crosshair_V_Formula/#specifications(
    Internal I/O section
    )
  21. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 5,981   +1,488

    Not exactly relevant to an EATX standard when they put 24pin on MicroATX motherboards. I'm not sure if it was initially know as only an EATX feature but the 24pin connector is now widespread across all ATX platforms.


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