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Samsung's 850 Evo SSD family gets a massive 4TB model

By Jos
Jul 11, 2016
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  1. Samsung pushed the SATA interface to its limit in with the 850 Pro and then made it cheaper with the 850 Evo. Now, the company is making another leap in the storage market, by doubling the top-end capacity to 4TB -- the highest offered by any consumer SSD.

    The 4TB Samsung 850 Evo SSD uses the company’s new 48-layer 256Gbit V-NAND, which it says “delivers unsurpassed performance, reliability and capacity.” Samsung claims the 850 Evo 4TB is able to deliver 540 MB/s sequential read and 520 MB/s sequential write speeds, and up to 98,000 random read and 90,000 random write IOPS.

    That’s in line with Samsung’s advertised performance for the line’s 500GB, 1TB and 2TB models. In terms of features it’s a familiar picture as well: there’s data encryption through TCG Opal and Microsoft's eDrive, TurboWrite to speed up write speeds through an SLC cache, and extra overprovisioning for internal operations like wear leveling and garbage collection to maintain performance consistency in long term use.

    The 4TB Samsung 850 Evo SSD carries a MSRP of $1499 with a five-year warranty and 300TB write endurance rating. That’s more than most people will pay for an entire system but its cost per gigabyte is in line the 2TB model at $0.37. The current 2TB 850 EVO sells for $675 on Amazon. Still, if you want a massive amount of fast storage in a small space, the 4TB Evo 850 comes in the standard 2.5 inch form factor and is only 7 millimeters thick.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 12, 2016
  2. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TS Guardian Fighter Posts: 8,559   +2,900

    Damn it, where is the drooling smiley when you want it?
     
    madboyv1 likes this.
  3. bmw95

    bmw95 TS Addict Posts: 106   +58

    Man... it ain't gonna be long till that goes all the way down to a few hundred dollars :D
     
  4. HamRadioGuy

    HamRadioGuy TS Rookie

    Not really sure why SSD drives are only available in the 2.5 inch and internal M.2 form factors. You would think that they could easily increase the capacity of these drives using the same technology by using a physically larger form factor. Most desktop computers and NAS devices use 3.5 inch drives, which are physically about 3 times the height and larger width/length. If they can squeeze 4TB's in a 2.5 inch SSD, shouldn't they be able to put 12TB+ into a 3.5 inch form factor that is about 3 times the height??? Heck, many computers and computer cases still accommodate 5.25 inch drives. Imagine the capacity of an SSD in a 5.25 inch drive form factor..... They are 5 times the height and 3 times the width/length than a 2.5 inch SSD. That's 15 times the volume. That would be 60TB..... While you and I couldn't afford it for a while, can you imagine the amount of space a large data center would save if they could install 60TB's in one drive bay?
     
  5. Kibaruk

    Kibaruk TechSpot Paladin Posts: 2,518   +506

    Yeah well... your premise is wrong in 2 parts, the first one is that no one could afford a 12TB drive, and even those who could probably wouldn't buy it, the second part, SSDs are not meant for long time storage (data centres) and also not a big fans of a huge amount of write operations means they are not for data-centres, add the price tag to it and no thank you sir.
     
  6. Uncle Al

    Uncle Al TS Evangelist Posts: 1,682   +788

    Personally, I'm just happy to see them making further advancements ... all of which bring the lower end products down into the very reasonably priced range! I'd love to see a 12 TB model ... that would bring the 4 TB model down to ...... chicken feed! And that's a ****-a-doodle-do for me and youuuuuu!!!!!!
     
    DaveBG and Darth Shiv like this.
  7. madboyv1

    madboyv1 TechSpot Paladin Posts: 1,333   +267

    Funny, because they already do put almost 12TB in a conventional 3.5" hard drive disk.
    https://www.hgst.com/products/hard-drives/ultrastar-archive-ha10

    Certainly this (and Seagate's similar solution) is not as fast as the NAND storage of SATA or NVRAM that is becoming popular in M.2 drives, but it would be probably an order of magnitude less expensive. Until fast solid state storage reaches parity with hard disk drives, it really is hard to see high capacity hard drives not staying relevant in cloud, enterprise, and archival systems.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2016
    Reehahs likes this.
  8. 3volv3d

    3volv3d TS Booster Posts: 134   +51

    That thing costs more than my car... 0-60 in ?
     
  9. Lionvibez

    Lionvibez TS Evangelist Posts: 1,104   +346

    Not only that Intel has SSD's that are made for data centers!
     
    madboyv1 likes this.
  10. avioza

    avioza TS Enthusiast Posts: 74   +23

    I have long suspected that industry leaders could rapidly push the envelope and develop the technology faster to result in much larger drive capacities. But if SSD's can slowly be released in smaller increases they could continue to generate revenue.

    It would not be the first time there has been collusion and price fixing with technology. (2002 DRAM price fixing)
     
  11. Emexrulsier

    Emexrulsier TS Guru Posts: 513   +46

    If price was a couple of hundred less could be a semi decent upgrade for the PS4.
     

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