SATA to PCI-e

By demonwars
Jun 17, 2013
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  1. Hello, I just bought a second Saphire HD6670 graphics card with a crossfire, but I own a CX430 power suply, it only has 1x 6pin PCI-e power cable,
    now I saw a cable that transformed SATA to PCI-e
    but eventhough its 4bucks I spent all my money on that video card and crossfire cable,

    does anyone know if I can just strip the sata to pci-e and strip those cables into the power insertion module in my graphics card?
  2. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 5,755   +1,421

    AMD Radeon™ HD 6670 Graphics System Requirements
    You will need a stronger power supply. The CX430 does not have enough wattage to power two cards, thats why there is only one PCIe power connector.
  3. demonwars

    demonwars Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    Then why at this site: http://www.coolermaster.outervision.com/PSUEngine
    I
    ts said I need a minimum voltage of 362w to run with my current setup AND 2 crossfired amdf radeon hd 6670?

    CPU: Phenom II 4x 3.5GHZ
    RAM: Corsair 2GB 4X
    Video: AMD Radeon HD6670 2X
    Video Type: Crossfire
    DVD: DVD-RW/DVD+RW 1x
    HDD: 2x Regular SATA
  4. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 5,755   +1,421

    That site is a power calculator that as far as I know doesn't calculate for headroom. The recommendation I gave above, comes from AMD which includes headroom. Headroom is added to keep from over stressing your power supply.

    This is not to mention the possible errors involved in making your own SATA-to-PCIe power adapter.
    Do you even have the connectors needed for connecting the SATA power to the card or was you thinking of wiring the PSU straight to the card? I'm going to venture a guess that you don't know about the dangers involved or the knowledge needed to make this happen. I'm guessing because you asked the question in the first place.

    My advice is to save your money for another power supply and don't waste any more time on a 4 dollar adapter that can cause damage to your graphics card and/or underpowered PSU, especially if you decide to modify your own adapter.
  5. demonwars

    demonwars Newcomer, in training Topic Starter

    Welllll, according to: http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/HD_6670/20.html the HD 6670 requires 42W of power, I ordered another HD6670 today (which makes a total of 2 of those in my pc, without the crossfire, and a cable from 2x molex to 1x PCI-e, im gonna disconnect my DVDdrive since I always use ISO anways, im gonna disconnect 1 HDD thats 750GB and make it external again with its own power source, and see whats gonna happend, since the dvd and hdd require about the same voltage I think its gonna end well, true?
  6. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 5,755   +1,421

    All I can say is you may be fine but unless you stay within guidelines, there is no guarantee of safety.

    And the thought of you trying this experiment and then expect Sapphire or Corsair to stand behind a product guarantee during product failure is sickening. Perhaps you could share with us who you are so we can report this behavior to Sapphire and Corsair, and void your replacement guarantee.


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