Will changes to network layout ruin the network?

By TwistEdFish
Feb 17, 2009
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  1. Greetings All,
    The situation I'm asking about today is arising from a need in my home. I currently have a DSL connection and a Wireless router which was purchased and installed for nothing other than my sons Ipod touch and has always worked perfectly the one and only computer in my home is hard wired to the router and is of course set as the server of the network, I will try to expalin below exactly what im doing without making it so long its just to much to bother reading.

    I now want to add another piece of equipment to the network and have just ordered the parts I need to do so, This new piece of equipment is a Kenwood Entre Entertainment Hub for my home theatre. My issue is that Im not sure if this hub has the ability to go wireless as it is limited on which USB to ETHERNET Adapters will even work with it.

    The Adapter I chose is the Belkin F5D5050 which is 1 of only 5 that kenwood says are usable. In searching around I have found it next to impossible to find a way to convert the ethernet back to USB on the other end of the Belkin adapter to allow me to use the LinkSys WUSB54G Wireless-G USB adapter to make the Entertainment hub wireless.

    So all that said What I now plan to do is put a LinkSys WMP54G Wireless-G PCI adapter in my computer and move the DSL modem and Router into the Home Theatre to allow me to hard wire the Kenwood hub. The big question I have is, if I do that will there be any problem with my computer remaining as the server on the network if it is wireless and with another device hard wired to the router when it will no longer be hard wired?

    Thanks Very much in advance for any and all information you can give to help me settle my mind as to any arising problems.
  2. Ididmyc600

    Ididmyc600 TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 2,251

    Wireless, wired, it doesnt matter, do anything you like to it, make it all wired or make it all wireless.

    A network is just a set of computers linked together, how they are linked is irrelevant.
  3. raybay

    raybay TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 10,716   +6

    But changes to the software can change the connection... any change to the configuration offers the risk of interrupting the network.
  4. gguerra

    gguerra TechSpot Enthusiast Posts: 559

    The only difference would be speed for your "server" which would be wireless and would be affected by interference and signal loss (walls). If you dont need that much speed then no big deal. Another thing I could suggest is something called a "powerline". This is if you dont feel like relocating your Linksys next to your Kenwood. In essence it will let you use you existing ac wiring for ethernet. They vary in cost anywhere from $70 to $150 on newegg. Ebay may have some cheaper. Another option is called a wireless print server which will connect to your Linksys via wireless and offers up to 4 hard wired ports. So depending on your need for speed that will determine what you need. I would assume you Kenwood needs hard wired in order to stream media at an acceptable speed.
  5. TwistEdFish

    TwistEdFish Newcomer, in training Topic Starter Posts: 18

    Hi All, Thanks for responses,
    As far as the needed speed for this new kenwood component it has nothing to do with streaming media. The reason for the connection with the entre is that it has the ability to Gather DVD and CD info and covers from the internet with its own built in system and will also gather and play Internet radio and display all that information on screen as a guide. Giving the ability to scroll through them with different selections for all 3 media types, making them easily playable with the click of a button and never again having to open a CD or DVD case to put it in a player .

    Speed after the initial download of the covers and what not is absolutely nill as I dont plan to use the internet radio much at all in the theatre since there is a full blown Kenwood audio system already in there. The rest of my Theatre system consists of 2 Kenwood DV-5050M Mega changers which each have a 403 disc capacity for both DVD and CD and are completely controlled by the Entre unit. Currently they will be loaded with 650+ DVD';s and about 100 CD's.

    So as long as my computer can still connect properly and be used with the same operational status as always This seems to be a good way to go and to still give the entre a broadband connection, I had looked at installing a HPNA adapter into my computer and using that type of connection just through the existing phone lines in my home as the Kenwood Entre has a Built in HPNA adapter and a Dial Up modem.

    Anyone used HPNA in the past?, Seems a Home Phone Network would be a good way to go also seeing as how I already have the Phone jacks in both places within inches of the computer and the Home theatre component closet where the Entre is now set up, if there are even Adapters still being sold by retailers for that type of home networking. Aside from Ebay of course where we all know anything is available.
  6. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,336   +293

  7. TwistEdFish

    TwistEdFish Newcomer, in training Topic Starter Posts: 18

    Thanks for the Info Jo, I have looked into the whole Power outlet network, I just feel its a bit expensive at an average of $45 each to purchase 2 of the outlet connectors in comparrison to the other methods of making this connection.

    Since the kenwood entre unit is already equipped with a HPNA adapter from the factory and would mean I would only have to purchase an adapter of the same type for my computer at an average Ebay price of $10 bucks for 3 of them, and would use all existing phone lines in my home as the network transfer lines.

    The paticular item im talking about is the Netgear PA301 Internal House Phone line network PC adapter card. Im currently contacting Netgear to see if they still offer this type of card in a newer model at retail locations. Anyone who hasnt read up on the whole HPNA should do so as it is a serious alternative to look at when creating a home network, I've read a lot on it and find it to be a viable alternative even today.
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