Blu-ray vs. HD DVD: The Format Wars @ TechSpot

By on January 23, 2006, 3:45 AM
DVDs are the current standard for data storage, and perhaps more importantly the publishing format standard as well. The question is however, how much longer will they be sufficient? A much anticipated battle, or ‘format war’ if you will, is in progress similar to that seen in the 1980’s between VHS and Betamax. This time around the same companies have fallen into the same camps and war is ensuing between Blu-ray and HD DVD technology.

Knowing very little about either, I decided to investigate these formats and what follows is hopefully an unbiased presentation of facts. At this time it is hard to say if there is a leader in this format race, or if there will ever be one, with products still not available in the retail market, and from what was shown at recent CES 2006 expo, manufacturers are still working hard on first generation players, which will inevitably be replaced just a few months later with more refined products once they reach the masses. Hopefully after reading this article you will be better informed about the two technologies, and why not, pick your own favorite, or call the industry for a much needed convergence (think of dual-format DVD±RW drives nowadays).



Read the complete article here.




User Comments: 30

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exscind said:
Good article. It is very informative and I actually learned quite a bit about this "format war." I had to grind through optics in my physics class so I actually understand the materials discussed. The explanations concerning the lasers and diffraction were correct and at the very least, enlightening.Basically the two main deciding factors are BD's bigger storage and companies' easier adaptability with HD DVD, which results in potential lower cost for consumers. Of course, theoretically it makes sense to switch to Blu-ray due to the bigger storage and future-proofing technology. In the long run, it would appear as of now that Blu-ray is of better technology than HD DVD. But HD DVD is more popular and thus have a better chance of being "compatible." This almost sounds like an Internet Explorer versus Firefox battle :). Personally, I'm rooting for Blu-ray. While companies may have to spend more in adopting BD technology, in the long run it will pay off. We can't simply live in present technology and never advance because revamping the technology costs more. Nevertheless, it will certainly be interesting to see who will win this battle, decided by the consumers, in the very near future.
paulwuzhere said:
I am edging towards blu ray. I have always trusted samsung. they will both be very useful. But when are they coming out?
divine said:
Yes, blue-ray technology is very good and has many advantages, but the adoptation will be difficult i guess.
Kaleid said:
Seems to be an interesting article, will have to read it later.
buttus said:
I have been following this issue rather closely. Having been caught in the middle of the Beta vs VHS format war (which we had purchased a Beta machine only to have the tapes die out in a matter of 2 years), I was most interested to find out who would win.In a nutshell I think the HD format is better (and much easier attainable as a technology step as opposed to Blue Ray which is a technology jump)....but yet most of the Movie Studios have chosen Blue Ray for the much larger capacity. Bigger isn't necessarily better but I suppose they are looking at the longevity of the media.Another fact here is simple. There is only one roadblock in the conclusion of the format war and the winning of that war by Blue Ray, and unfortunately it is one HUGE obstacle.Microsoft.Microsoft refuses to support the Blue Ray technology. If MS had supported Blue Ray then this would all be over, and HD would become a question in Trivial Pursuit the 2000's edition. However, Redmond is being particularily stubborn and it wouldn't be the first time that MS has able to exert such a strong influence to affect the direction of consumer driven technology.The only hope here is similar to the DVD+/- RW drives we currently enjoy. Dual Format will be the only way to assure that a cconsumer civil war is avoided.On the other hand, given the bitter nature of this conflict I shudder to think of the initial costs of such devices.
MonkeyMan said:
Well, Blue Ray is undoubtably better than HDTV, in my opinion, because it can store up to over 27 GB of data. HDDVD can only store 15GB. As opposed to movies, longer is better. This war is imminent, and I'm guessing, that it isn't going to end on a positive note. I wouldn't count out the Microsoft deal just yet, because maybe Microsoft may come to there senses, and support Blue ray. On the other hand, they could include both drives with their software, in two different versions, to prevent this war from occuring. Therefore, Microsoft would be backing both, so if there is a favorite between the two, neither will be bashed as a separate issue. Microsoft holds the key, and it's not to late for them to change their minds.
mentaljedi said:
I think Blu-ray is the better contender. In the long run and also the short term since Samsung has just announced completion of is drive. They should get them out this year, perhaps before Vista when everyone scrambles for new hardware.
PUTALE said:
I am going to wait awhile till the price drop and to see which one wins. Or when the dual format comes out. I think that's the smart move. I don't know which one is better right now but I am sure regardelss of which one is better, the market will eventually leaning toward one or the other, so it's smarter way to wait and see which one to buy.
otmakus said:
If u're going to shop for a movie, or a game, or a software, or even a blank media, and find out that blu ray disc costs £10 while HD-DVD disc costs about the same as a DVD disc costs now (less than a buck, mostly), which one will u buy?[url]http://www.bit-tech.net/news/2006/01/20/sony_blu_ra
_pc_march/[/url]
Per Hansson said:
Very good article, great work!I just have one question, exactly why is MS backing HD-DVD and not Blu Ray?
sngx1275 said:
I kind of want Blue-Ray to win too. But then I got thinking about it some more. With HD-DVD, you will still be able to fit a movie on it in HD, there isn't going to be any video comming out anytime soon that has a higher resolution than HDTV right now. So I see HD-DVD as 'good enough' and likely going to be cheaper. Blue-Ray is 'better than good enough', and more expensive, its ahead of its time.The 'future proofing' of Blue-Ray by potentially surpassing 100Gigs sounds good, but these are still optical disks here, and even though BR is using more scratch resistant plastic, it is still not scratch proof. And I bet if you step on it accidentally on carpet its going to break just the same. Now your 200 Gigs of whatever data you had on it is gone forever. Hopefully when the time comes you are carrying around a cd wallet full of 200Gig BR disks there will be a better and faster storage platform.
PanicX said:
[b]Originally posted by Per Hansson:[/b][quote]I just have one question, exactly why is MS backing HD-DVD and not Blu Ray?[/quote][b]Excerpt from [url=http://www.eet.com/news/latest/showArticle.jhtml?articl
ID=175400242]EEtimes Article[/url]:[/b][quote]Zucker added that he has no idea why Dell's major partners — Intel and Microsoft — are opposing Blu-ray and backing HD-DVD. In his opinion, slight differences in the copy protection scheme for Blu-ray will not prevent users from making so-called "managed copies" of content on the disks, a feature that he said was a priority for both camps.[/quote]
PanicX said:
[b]Originally posted by sngx1275:[/b][quote]I kind of want Blue-Ray to win too. But then I got thinking about it some more. With HD-DVD, you will still be able to fit a movie on it in HD, there isn't going to be any video comming out anytime soon that has a higher resolution than HDTV right now. So I see HD-DVD as 'good enough' and likely going to be cheaper. Blue-Ray is 'better than good enough', and more expensive, its ahead of its time.The 'future proofing' of Blue-Ray by potentially surpassing 100Gigs sounds good, but these are still optical disks here, and even though BR is using more scratch resistant plastic, it is still not scratch proof. And I bet if you step on it accidentally on carpet its going to break just the same. Now your 200 Gigs of whatever data you had on it is gone forever. Hopefully when the time comes you are carrying around a cd wallet full of 200Gig BR disks there will be a better and faster storage platform.[/quote]As far as I know, HD-DVD doesn't have the capacity to support 1080P where as Blu-Ray does, yet neither officially support 1080P. For those that are unfamilure with HDTV, theres currently 2 popular resolution formats, 720P and 1080i. The P in 720P stands for progressive scan, every field is a full frame. The i in 1080i stands for interlaced which means each field is half of a frame. 1080P is the next step in HDTV formats and is even currently supported by several high end HDTV sets. Films created by Lucas Arts are shot at 1080P resolution and then downscaled to fit common formats. So the material exists, the equipment exists, we're simply limited on bandwidth and media.
DragonMaster said:
IMO, the HD-DVD copy-protection is just a little too much.VHS rules!
Race said:
After researching both formats, it seems to be boiling down to what's mainly at stake here....a multi-multi-billion dollar industry, and I would imagine, some big egos.The winning format, if there is one, will not only dictate all new movies, but TV's and all other compatible displays.A hybrid player for both formats would be cool, but I believe, would require seperate reading lasers and other mechanisms. The size of the players would probably have to be bigger, and can you imagine the cost of one of these puppies?As for myself, there are things I very much like about both technologies, so I'm still un-decided.On a related note, I'm intrigued by a third format I've recently been hearing about. The only thing about this format is the backwards compatibility issue.Here's a quote I found:"Both Blue-Ray and HD-DVD may find themselves outrun by the Holographic Versatile Disc (HVD).While Blu-Ray and HD-DVD use the same laser, other producers thought of combining the two lasers (red and blue), in a single ray, and on a disc the size of a CD or DVD, 1 TB of data could be stored (20 times more than on a Blu-Ray disc), with a transfer rate of 1 Gbit/s.The format is developed by the Japanese company Optware, in collaboration with Fuji Photo and CMC Magnetics. The three companies allied with Nippon Paint, Pulstec Industrial and Toagosei and "HVD Alliance" was born.The problem is that, while Blu-Ray and HD-DVD still allow the reading of present DVDs, along with the passing to the holographic storage era, the DVD days are over.So, all in all, the disc format battle could be won by a surprise competitor".
sngx1275 said:
PanicX - If thats true that HD-DVD won't support 1080i then I hope it does lose. I was just assuming both BR and HD would do 1080i. I don't have an HDTV set, and won't until I move somewhere that offers more HD channels (Even Dish only has a handful of HDTV channels). But when I do, the set is going to be capable of 1080i, and I would not buy a HD-DVD unit if it can't perform on par with the TV.
Nintendo said:
[b]Originally posted by sngx1275:[/b][quote]PanicX - If thats true that HD-DVD won't support 1080i then I hope it does lose. I was just assuming both BR and HD would do 1080i. I don't have an HDTV set, and won't until I move somewhere that offers more HD channels (Even Dish only has a handful of HDTV channels). But when I do, the set is going to be capable of 1080i, and I would not buy a HD-DVD unit if it can't perform on par with the TV.[/quote]PanicX said 1080P (P P P P P P) no less than 4 times. Where in the world did you come up with 1080i?
JMMD said:
The Blu-Ray boxes at CES said 1080P on them. I don't think the media is a limiting factor on the P vs. I issue. I have a 1080i HDTV but I will be waiting to see what happens between the two formats and I will probably get a universal player when it comes out. For those that are familiar with DVD-A and SACD, this seems like it could become the same thing. High resolution music is a great idea but it wasn't marketed well and there just wasn't enough support.
barfarf said:
All i want to know will the Blue-Ray or HD-DVD players support divx or xvid. That will be the big reason i would buy one for my uses since i have a lot of video in xvid format. Of course by the time these come units come down in price i might have computer hooked up directly to the HDTV. Another reason i may purchase is for backup. A question i have is how long will the media last?
AARGH said:
The biggest difference that was completely omitted in this article is the "managed copy" that is standard in HD-DVD that at last I read was "optional" in Blu-Ray. You can blather over storage and theoritical limits, but when you want to have your content on your HTPC or portable player you will be SOL with Blu-Ray. This is the main reason the movie studios (ie Sony, Disney) want it and not HD-DVD. For once MS is not the big overpowering monkey. MS wants the interoperability of media through all devices. Sony's history with their own formats make me extra wary as well.
Nintendo said:
Just to be clear, the content is all 1080p/24, not 1080i. The first generation of HD-DVD players (and blu-ray) however will not be able to output at 1080p due to the limitations of the current HDMI specs (HDMI supporting 1080p should be finalized soon).
insidious420 said:
AARGH made a good point about the "managed copy" feature. While I haven't personally researched this in depth, it sounds accurate, and it sounds precisely like something Sony and other major entertainment companies would like to avoid to potentially line their pockets with more money.Not to say that Microsoft isn't a money hog either, but let's think about this logically. Sony is a pure entertainment company; typically, they specialize in hardware and publishing entertainment media. They LOST the last format war, even though Betamax was technically superior to VHS. Microsoft on the other hand is a computer, hardware & software company with an interest in supporting a truely versatile and flexible format suited to MANY uses with full, open compatibility.Technically, Blu-Ray may have better specs than HD-DVD, mainly more storage, but I think the storage is overkill, especially when production costs and other negative tradeoffs are taken into account. As far as movies go, even in 1080p I'd be surprised if a dual-layer HD-DVD (~30GB) could not hold a full-length movie.This is already long but I have 2 more thoughts:After the Sony fiasco with their crap "copy protection" software on CDs crippling hundreds of thousands of PCs, why the hell should we trust them again, especially with the next big step in storage technology?Lastly, the percentage of consumers who currently own HD compatible sets is pretty small. Obviously, the technology is not a cheap investment, so wouldn't the cheaper choice be the most appealing to consumers wanting to upgrade to HD sets, and therefore to manufacturers trying to increase installed user bases?
devourer said:
After reading the article, I now know that blue ray is the better technology than HD-DVD. besides being able to store more data (25GB per layer versus 15GB), having a "scratch resistant" disk is a plus also. Unfortunately, better/superior technology means higher price. There's not much HD content (that I know of) anyways and I do believe that DVD's have at least 2-3 more years in it so by that time, probably and hopefully, only one technology will remain and prices for both the player/recorder and disks are inexpensive enough for us consumers.
KillerPrince said:
i would say blu-ray is the way to go
djleyo said:
After reading the article blue ray is the hay to go but since the technology is better im pretty sure the price is going to be higher the hd-dvd in my home i have all sony products i think i have to start saving some money .I think consumers by the time these two technologies come out they are going to be fed up with the growing prices o consumer electronics ,hardware ,and software i hope all companies work it out But i think hd-dvd is the one thats going to come out winning (price)
cold_storage said:
This article did help bring a few things together but missed a few vital points in the format war.First though, the confusion about 1080p and resolutions supported. Neither Blu-Ray nor HD-DVD will support 1080p to start, since the spec for 1080p over HDMI (with HDCP) is not finalised, but both will be able to support it just fine once this is the case. Also something else to remember, an awful lot of the 1080p HDTV's that you can buy now, will not be able to take a 1080p signal from these players - Blu Ray or HD-DVD. The reason being older versions of HDMI and/or lack of HDCP verification. Managed copy is going to be a huge pull for a lot of people, especially tech savvy early adopters. HD-DVD spec states that you MUST be able to make a 'managed copy' of the movie. Managed copy meaning being able to rip it to your PC, or some future media server type affair. This is a huge reason for Microsoft supporting HD-DVD, it's good for their media center business, it's also the reason that anyone who uses Media Center may be swayed to HD-DVD. Blu-Ray Association grudgingly included the ability to have managed copy in thier disc spec under pressure from HP (Who were Blu-Ray only and now are saying they will support both, but are swaying towards HD-DVD). However blu-ray's version of managed copy means that it is possible, but up to the studio's discretion whether they want you to be able to view your content as you want, or if they want to bleed you dry by making you paying numerous times for the same content. The other reasons Microsoft likes HD-DVD is that it does not use a Java system for the menu's, but a microsoft developed system, called VC-1 or something I believe. HD-DVD also seems likely to have support for HD-WMV formats as well as mpeg4 (H.264 or whatever it's acronym is now, forgive me if I have it wrong, cant be bothered to look it up right now)Which leads me to my next point missed in the article but important to the war. Codec's. Sony recently announced that they would not be using H.264, but would instead be sticking with the tried and trusted mpeg2, i.e. same codec as DVD. HD-DVD is going to be using H.264, with option for microsofts codec i believe.Why does that matter? Well, Sony's decision seems to be based on making Blu-Ray's advantage seem more important than it really is. How much do DVD's store? about 4.5GB per layer, dual layer discs, known as DVD-9, are 9GB (A little less than 9 in practice I believe, more like 8.7 or something)HD-DVD is 15GB single layer, and 30GB dual layer (They have working dual layer HD-DVD's and can produce them easily), and are working on triple layerBlu-Ray is 25GB per layer, currently dual layer is prototype only and not ready for mass production, but when it is they have a whopping 50GB. Blu-Ray has a pretty significant space advantage - now they have to convince you that you need it - problem is - you dont. The reason why you dont? Codecs. Movie Codecs have come a fairly long way since mpeg2, dont forget mpeg2 is a decade old, current codecs are more efficient and produce better image quality and less artifacts in less storage space - the trade off? They need more processing power to decode. Seen how easily even a 480p HD-WMV video will bring a P4 3.8GHz to its knees? A 2.5 hour movie with Dolby DTS encoded in 720p H.264 will take up around 9GB of space, so DVD-9 is only just shy of being able to store it (shame DVD players couldn't decode it). the same movie in mpeg2 will take up a lot more room (close to double, but I dont have compression rates at hand to calculate). All of a sudden HD-DVD's 15GB looks ample, 30GB looks positively gluttenous, and Blu-Ray has a problem. Their size advantage really doesn't make that big a difference. So they use mpeg2 - reduces their costs as they need less advanced decoders, and makes their space advantage look better as they will doubtlessly spout some garbage about less compression = better quality.To be honest the best thing any of us can do is ignore both formats until they learn to get along. Until then get yourself a progressive scan DVD player and a HDTV that will upscale 480p signals. The jump from standard def to that would be enough to keep you away from HD-DVD and Blu-Ray for a while.
Mictlantecuhtli said:
[b]Originally posted by cold_storage:[/b][quote]Blu-Ray has a pretty significant space advantage - now they have to convince you that you need it - problem is - you dont. The reason why you dont? Codecs. [/quote]Eh, there will be HD-DVD and Blu-Ray drives for computers. Do you think no one will use them to back up their 100+ GB hdds, or to store other data?I wouldn't complain if there was a single disc having all episodes of some TV series, either.
rellufnalla said:
While all you guys are waiting and hoping for the blue laser, I will continue recording HD and enjoying 1080i with my trusty D-vhs tape that holds 40 GB. I recall I went through three DVD players before I finally got a good one that wouldn't freeze or wig out. How long will it it take this time around to get the bugs out and deliver a reliable product? How about 2008 or 2009.My collection of dvds just don't do it for me anymore. Its HD or naught. thank god for JVC
Master_Jedi said:
All of this will be obsolete in 5 years or so, the companies know this and want to use HD-DVD to get as much money from us as fast as possible and as cheaply and as easily as they possibly can, because it's cheaper to adapt than to re-invent. What do you think their real intentions are? of course, money!!!!! Their not going to tell you that it is possible to make a standalone player that you can plug your existing IDE or SATA drives in now and use the storage of a normal HDD that can hold 490TBs. They want ease, and when we talk about how easy it is, it means greed, not convenience for the consumer.We can run cars on water now, which only emission is water? Do you ever think it will reach the market as is, or will it be modified to make us pay for something, anything? This idea was founded 50 years ago.....And they are making hybrid cars instead which use electricity, and cells combined so we have to go to a station and recharge at a price, instead of just filling it with the water you drank last night and re-using the same water for eternity, so we wont have to continually use our water resources, or use up our oceans water and turn into Mars one day!!....There will always be a line in which we will have to give up at least some money when it can be run from FREE ENERGY....Greed is what keeps us from utilizing the true potential of the human mind...As of now, movies are to be sold on the internet as soon as they are released into Cinemas. Months after, they are on DVD. 2 years ago, this was the move to stop piracy, and get as much money as possible before we started ripping them. Now, they think if they release the DVD faster, it will catch as many people as possible to buy it instead of linger it and come across a P2P program that is giving it away free because they think people can't wait for its release. This in turn, leads to the question? what next? Well, they will be releasing movies online for a fee, you will be able to download this new movie as soon as it is released onto big screens in perfect DVD quality, this in turn saves them money, saves attorney fees for taking individuals to court (only for most of them to get thrown out by the judge) and will be more practical because not everyone goes to the movies, and not everyone is an outright criminal (even innocent people are getting trapped because of the ease of getting a movie for free.) If it's there, all I have to do is click this and it's done in 7 minutes then watch it --FOR FREE!!!!!! BUT!, if you get the word out to those that don't understand rules and laws and say it's not legal to do, then there will be people who will pay a buck or two to watch it in perfect quality and not have to wait a year before it's on TV or video (even I would pay.) This in turn will lead to us buying, then recording the stream, then finally, backing it up for future watching. Even though we can record the streams and so forth, it will cut down piracy by at least 10%, that's a hefty 300 million per county per movie. Movies only make so much at a Cinema, imagine all those people at home that don't get to go to the movies because they work, or don't have 15 bucks to watch it, so 1 - 2 dollars should be fine, that will entice millions at home to watch the newest movies, and they will pay, because it's so cheap...if you want to be greedy, you get burned, and that's the way it has gone....I would rather that money than those guys getting it free off a P2P program. I mean, 1 billion off a movie is unheard of because like I said, not everyone can get to the movies, but if it was convenient and at the tip of your fingers, how much more money do you think movie companies can make of us, and we will be willing to do so...You will still get the occasional pirate, but they wont care too much anymore, because they are making 100 times more than what they would've if it cost more and was an inconvenience to others. Movie and music industries got caught in their own web of greed and are paying for it. So they think releasing the DVD faster will make up for the loss, and releasing new security such as AACS to stop duplication. The only real way to do it is to bring it to our PCs or door step, at a far cheaper cost. Think of the volume, and not how much you think it's worth to one person. It will pay off in the end, because it is a high end industry, not a low end one . You will always get customers coming back.. Because sometimes it's just out of some peoples reach because it isn't a need it's a want! Their own greed has blinded them into thinking the more it costs the more they'll make. It's the total opposite with something like this, because most everyone likes to watch a movie now and again, it's not like we are buying a new car every week.Anyways, back on topic..The newest HDD is 750GiB, soon to be 490TBs in 2010 using (HAMR) from Seagate. There will be no need for HD-DVD or Blue-Ray...Since all games, movies, music will be legally available in the future for download.This is a ploy to get as much money from us as possible before any of us find out the truth behind what's actually going on. Now I have told you, you can either do it because you can and want to and don't care, or you can wait for the bells to ring and be smart about the big picture. It is coming, don't get caught up in the times because that's the new "in thing". Get smart, and soon, we can get a 490TB HDD that is just as capable as a Blue-Ray or HD-DVD all in the same dimensions for far less money.490TBs gives us 1,003,520 hours of 720x576 compressed PAL video (if each movie was 2 hours long). If you are tight on quality, you get about 196,000 hours of uncompressed at resolutions of 720x576 PAL. If you are even tighter you can get 2 hours of 1080i at 2 GiB which equals around 500,000 hours per 490TBscompressed with XviD or 78,400 hours of 1080p uncompressed on one 490TB HDD from Seagate, ready to be released in around 2010.So...which would you rather? a bunch of discs that can be scratched, and stacked and bought for 50 bucks a blank.Or 1 single HDD 15cmx7cmx1.5cm, that holds 9800 (nine thousand eight hundred) blue rays @ 12cmx0.5mm @ 50GiBs each atits potential, for $1,ooo US? As apposed to the $500,000 (half a million dollars) you will spend on Blue ray discsat 50 bucks each. I'm not saying you will ever get this many, but I am saying that if you can get this much outof something so cheap, and so small, why would you go the opposite direction? Less storage for more money? or More storage for less money? And don't forget the actually space you need to store what you buy. 9800 Discs would take up roughly (if stacked in a slim case and stacked on top of each other) 40.9 meters (high) as opposed tothe same storage space in a smaller dimension of 15cmx7cmx1.5cm...The size of your HDD...And that is not even the full story. There is Holographics to dive into yet using crystals, and thorium storage to store data on light waves onto atoms with near infinite storage capabilities......We are only capable of what we are capable of now because we move with the times, and improve on something that we know worked in the past. Notice everyone says "look how far we have come in such a small amount of time, and it's getting progressively better at a faster pace," only those things that are revolutionary should be considered to be a quantum leap, not those that we improve on until we hit the end of its potential and then have to think of a new totally radical way to further convenience our lives. Look how far we have come in 2 years of CPUS alone? When we start to think outside the box, and use totally different methods, we will only (always) progress on it to better help us do things faster with more convenience, not what is possible to do with "it". We are only limited in our progression because of greed, it takes money to manufacturer what we use everyday. Imagine if there was no such thing as money and everyone worked for each other? Imagine what we could accomplish technologically. Not to mention other benefits like going to work knowing that you don't get paid, because you don't need to, because everything you need is free, because everyone is working for everyone, just work because your fellow partners or friends need to use whatever you make for a living. Which is why we have famine, people out on the streets, etcetera....Greed is the root of all evil.I hope I've warped your noodles... :)
Master_Jedi said:
[quote][b]Originally posted by cold_storage:[/b]Blu-Ray has a pretty significant space advantage - now they have to convince you that you need it - problem is - you dont. The reason why you dont? Codecs. [/quote]Nice :)[quote][b]Originally posted by Mictlantecuhtli:[/b]Eh, there will be HD-DVD and Blu-Ray drives for computers. Do you think no one will use them to back up their 100+ GB hdds, or to store other data? [/quote]No, I buy HDDs in bulk to store my data, unplug it, and shift it away :)...I only use my DVD burner to copy stuff for friends..It's totally impractical to back data up to a HD-DVD or Blueray seeing as it doesn't hold enough. If the Bluerays held at least 1TB or more, then I would think about it, and it has to be cheaper per Gig.[Edited by Master_Jedi on 2006-05-01 13:29:48][Edited by Master_Jedi on 2006-05-01 13:31:32]
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