Kingston announces water-cooled HyperX H2O memory kits

By on August 3, 2010, 11:32 AM
Kingston today announced the latest additions to its HyperX memory kits lineup, the HyperX H2O. The launch includes one triple channel and two dual channel DDR3 kits made up of modules equipped with a newly-designed heatspreader which -- as the name suggests -- can be connected to water cooling setups.

The highest performing kit features two 2GB modules rated to run at 2,133MHz with latency timings of 9-11-9-27. A dual channel 4GB (2x2GB) kit is rated to run at 2,000MHz with the same timings, while a triple channel 6GB (3x2GB) kit can also by run at a frequency of 2,000MHz but with slightly faster latency timings of 9-10-9-27. According to Kingston, all sticks can achieve their top-rated speeds at the standard maximum voltage setting of 1.65V, but the extra cooling should provide a little head-room for those looking to push their systems a bit harder without making them unstable.


All modules also support Intel XMP profiles to make things easier for overclockers, and are backed by a lifetime warranty as well as free technical support from Kingston. In terms of pricing, the HyperX H2O kits are available at $157 for the 2,000MHz 4GB kit, $205 for the 2,133MHz pair, and $235 for the triple channel 6GB set running at 2,000MHz.




User Comments: 12

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ansarimikail said:

This is exactly the type of stuff I think I will be getting for my system...

like 5 years from now (when its old).

natefalk natefalk said:

Do you really need water-cooling on the memory?

PanicX PanicX, TechSpot Ambassador, said:

Should be useful for overclockers. Unstable RAM is what usually capped my overclocks.

Staff
Per Hansson Per Hansson, TS Server Guru, said:

Ehh, a straight tube that runs thru the RAM?

-200 for lack of effort

A directed fan and some RAM with a decent heatsink will cool way better than this

Plus how would you connect water hoses to 3 or 6 of these sticks without creating kinks?

Leeky Leeky said:

Ehh, a straight tube that runs thru the RAM?

-200 for lack of effort

A directed fan and some RAM with a decent heatsink will cool way better than this

Plus how would you connect water hoses to 3 or 6 of these sticks without creating kinks?

Could you not use T-pieces and connect them all with straight runs of piping?

I'm suprised you can't get reinforced piping that resists kinking - That's a serious concern in the confines of a PC case in my opinion.

(I've not clicked the link by the way)

PanicX PanicX, TechSpot Ambassador, said:

splitter? [link]

treetops treetops said:

For ddr3 ram that is not really even that expensive, usually the cheapest is 100$ for 4 gigs. When I get another 4 gig this is what I will be buying.

Staff
Per Hansson Per Hansson, TS Server Guru, said:

Sure there are 90 bends you can buy, but it kind of defeats the purpose don't you think (I mean why make them straight in the first place)

In most motherboard designs the graphics card will be right below the memory, so there is no way you could run a tube there...

The nipples should be facing straight up, then it's much better

Plus it should be an actual waterloop leading the water closer to the ramchips

Not a straight tube just tacked on at the top

PanicX PanicX, TechSpot Ambassador, said:

I see what you mean. It'd probably work best if they had some copper spreaders using the "heat pipe" style cooling to a water block and the water block would attach across several dims. I can see this being a real problem if you have really close dim slots too. Would you even be able to put 2 of these next to each other?

LinkedKube LinkedKube, TechSpot Project Baby, said:

You have to assume that the heat spreader is just as wide as the nickel plated tube going through the top. With that said you be sure that there's something there you cant see. Pretty sure there is a liquid canal setup which we cant see from that picture.

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