Nokia pushes DSL speeds to 825Mbps

By on October 25, 2010, 8:29 PM
Nokia Siemens Networks has announced that it has successfully tested a technology that could boost the data-carrying capacity of standard copper wires. The result is astonishing: speeds of 825Mbps over a distance of 400 meters of bonded copper lines and 750Mbps over a distance of 500 meters. Right now, we are only starting to see the availability of DSL that can deliver 100Mbps. If this technology is ever christened as viable enough to go commercial, it would allow ISPs that offer DSL to push out even more from their copper infrastructure.

NSN manages to pull off the feat by creating phantom (virtual) channels that "supplement the two physical wires that are the standard configuration for copper transmission lines." First shown off by Alcatel-Lucent's Bell Labs in April 2010, the approach is called Phantom DSL and can boost bandwidth between 50 to 75 percent over existing bonded copper lines. "Laying down new optical fiber to the home remains costly, though it is capable of delivering very high speeds and is a definite solution for long-term bandwidth requirements, Eduard Scheiterer, NSN's head of broadband access business line, said in a statement. "However, the innovative use of technologies such as phantom circuits helps operators provide an efficient last mile connectivity with existing copper wires."

It is quite surprising to see DSL technologies based on copper wiring staying competitive with cable broadband and fiber. Upgrades in DSL speeds are coming at a useful time: DSL has started to lose market momentum, and carriers don't want to just drop it after all the money they've already invested. While fiber networks are better in the long run, most phone companies need to squeeze out more from their copper networks without losing too much ground to cable broadband rivals as the world shifts to wireless networks. That being said, these new DSL technologies are still in the labs and may not work very well over long distances, not to mention all the other technical restrictions. Somehow we doubt you'll ever get 800Mbps at home, from DSL anyway.





User Comments: 63

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posermobile89 said:

This is very impressive. My questions is, is the reason that cable has faster speed than DSL due to the cable architecture, i.e. cable was more strands per wire so it can carry more data?

Anshrew said:

I was under the impression that DSL used the old copper phone lines while Cable "BroadBand" used fiber optics, or at the very least something better than copper.

posermobile89 said:

anshrew said:

I was under the impression that DSL used the old copper phone lines while Cable "BroadBand" used fiber optics, or at the very least something better than copper.

I always though my cable internet actually used my cable lines, which I thought were copper. I mean, it comes into the house and i split it, one goes to the tv one goes to the modem.

tacobfm said:

I have to admit this is impressive.

South Korea might get its average speed to 1000 mbps by its deadline.

gwailo247, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

The more ways high speed internet can go into your home the better, it will keep costs lower.

TechDisciple said:

I don't even want to imagine the internet data plans price...

motrin said:

400 meters.. i need like 15 miles. thats if this would come to my country/state/small town...

vangrat said:

400 meters...that is not all that good. Yes it is an "improvement" but only slightly. Now if they had said 2-3km we would have something to talk about.

argoxp said:

It will specially handy on third world countries where cooper based networks are already in place and would be to expensive to replace. Countries like Mexico will benefit the most due to it size.

IAMTHESTIG said:

This is all good news but still useless as far as i'm concerned. I don't think we have enough backbone internet infrastructure to support these speeds for everyone at once. I get the impression we are already way oversubscribed in terms of numbers of users promised X amount of bandwidth to the internet, while only Y amount is available because everyone is using it. Maybe I don't know what i'm talking about and there is plenty of reserve bandwidth, but I just think we should increase our bandwidth within the infrastructure first, then worry about the all the fingers reaching out in the cities.

klepto12 klepto12, TechSpot Paladin, said:

wow i have 10meg and think its ok but 800 meg would be sick lol. i think a 50meg standard would be great for dsl.

TomSEA TomSEA, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Very impressive - as long as you only live 400 feet from the sender.

lawfer, TechSpot Paladin, said:

This is like owning a Bugatti Veyron without a license plate.

---agissi--- ---agissi---, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Haha @ TomSEA. Yeah, it looks like the returns diminish quickly with added meters given.

grimm808 said:

It's such a shame I won't see any of these massive speedy internet connections, since I live in the 50th state, close to the middle of the pacific ocean, 6 hours plane ride from California. Our fastest internet connection here is Roadrunner, which gives 1MB upload, which is decent/average speed for online gaming, but I wish I could get my hands on monthly fiber-optic, or something along these lines.

speeedy6 said:

All I know is I desperately need an upgrade to my 2.5Mbps connection from stupid at&t.

pTk said:

Wow this would be awesome as I could see it helping out smaller towns, such as mine where the fastest connection you can get is 6mbps DSL

crazyboy88 said:

Now if they could actually start pushing 10mbps lines here in our neighborhood (Philippines) then maybe I could start dreaming about getting a 100mbps DSL connection

Jibberish18 said:

Now this isn't the first time I heard of a new sort of technology or algorithm that could improve the DSL speeds. The last I remember was a young man from Australia. Not sure what ever happened with that. Now I wonder, how fast do the speeds of this particular technology deteriorate as distance increases? DSL from AT&T at my house is very unstable and slow because I'm basically at least 10,000 ft. from the nearest central office. So, stretch this tech out to to 10,000 ft. and what does 825 Mbit's turn to?

f111 said:

It will be 80 years before we see anything like that in New Zealand, we are already behind and the govt refuses to increase fibre optic to nearest continent, so we'll be sitting here with our lovely 6.5mb/s (even Kazakstan has a higher average download speed) while the rest of the world streaks ahead...

highlander84 said:

No, its how it operates. Cable is a single Coax cable. it has to do with the frequency and channel spacing. But 500meters? This is almost worthless. Unless your sitting right on top of the branch office you would get nothing...

xcelofjkl said:

From where Im from, 6Mbps is already expensive. And sometimes you don't even get what you pay for. 1Gbps.. one can just imagine the power you wield when you have this.

ashaman1 said:

I hope this technology hits mainstream usage soon... at&t has already started using pair bonding in my town for their uverse hybrid fiber/copper FTTN IPTV technology to supposedly almost double their range from the VRAD to the copper "last mile" to the home but even with that extension of range I am still too far to qualify for the service. Sigh... time warner cable service is craptacular in my area for both video and internet service so I am forced to putter along at about 2.6 mbps and getting robbed monthly by directv. Hell, I would kill for at least 6 mbps so anything else above that is just gravy.

Guest said:

I just found out Shaw internet. in a few citys in canada are testing out 1 Gigabit internet. OMFG Dam i figerd the 100 mbps they have in my area was fast..

vangrat said:

Jibberish18 said:

Now this isn't the first time I heard of a new sort of technology or algorithm that could improve the DSL speeds. The last I remember was a young man from Australia. Not sure what ever happened with that. Now I wonder, how fast do the speeds of this particular technology deteriorate as distance increases? DSL from AT&T at my house is very unstable and slow because I'm basically at least 10,000 ft. from the nearest central office. So, stretch this tech out to to 10,000 ft. and what does 825 Mbit's turn to?

The article you are talking about can be found here: [link]

They state that the researcher could make the internet "100 times faster." My guess is that this would be only over a very short distance...possibly the research we are looking at here is taken directly from this Aussie bloke?

fritz123 said:

pushing this technology to this level is good and all, but in my opinion, it's gonna be hard do to sustain. i mean, 400meters is kind of small for commercial usage and it will need a lot of these virtual channels. i wonder if doing that will be expensive. if so, it will kinda be defeating the purpose of pursuing further development of this technology. i think we should move to the next best thing which is fiber optics. well, that's just me. haha

Serag said:

400 meters is a waste since the speed will drop the more far the distance is.

But maybe they'll make it better in development, we really need that over here

omega00 said:

Yes, this is very impressive but we as a nation are way behind other countries in terms of pure speed. I wish the old douches in Washington realize that they need to wake up from the Reagan era and move forward to an era where technology and science will drive this nation. Instead, they are stuck playing pass the crap to the next generations while getting their fill of social security and medicare. I wish they would wake up and spend money on something worthwhile such as improving broadband accessibility.

zogo said:

I agree, they should focus on fiber optics technology much more instead of developing more effective DSL based on copper wiring. Go into the future not into the past

grvalderrama said:

Do you want to know the speed of my Internet connection? You'll be laughing at me... cause it is a damn good joke

Johny47 said:

The 'improvement on the distance isn't that big but if they can keep doing it then cool, and what does DSL mean anyways?

I had DSL broadband once(Wanadoo, very reliable I thought =/) back when I used to share the internet 2 ways through two USB modems, I only got about 1.1mbps but the very embaressing thing is... right now I only get about 0.4mbps with regular ethernet broadband(Sky s***band).

samironsy said:

very nice but i think that the price coud be a problem

Ahmed90 Ahmed90 said:

500 meter is too short in most cities

500 meter to the phone/dsl company is way too short

(

NeoFlux said:

825Mbps is VERY much .... even on fiber most ISP's do not have data plans even near that fast. Lets just hope implementation of this technology on IPS's end do not require much investment. I could use speed boost on my DSL, since fiber is not an option for me

princeton princeton said:

The government should take the money they're supposedly putting back into the country from lottery sales into putting down fiberoptic cables to majors cities.

milford50 said:

Most providers would just love to pull on DSL, hope this can work in real world situations...

JMMD JMMD, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

I'm all for faster speeds but I'd really like to see some progress towards making it cheaper. Our cable provider offers two plans. One at 1.5mb and the other at 12mb. Nothing in between. I'd be happy with say 5mb at a price point in between the two.

Brodieeee said:

xcelofjkl said:

From where Im from, 6Mbps is already expensive. And sometimes you don't even get what you pay for. 1Gbps.. one can just imagine the power you wield when you have this.

No doubt even with this new technology we still won't get what we pay for

RebelFlag said:

I am happy about anything that looks at increasing the speeds across DSL lines, as that is considered legacy technology. Even though the 825Mb is only for 400 meters, at normal distances from the phone box, that is still going to be faster than the 25Mb currently offered as max speed by my provider.

People need to be more positive about technology moving forward. It might not be perfect but it is a step in the right direction. Don't forget it was only a little over 100 years ago that cars were slower than horses, until the technology got further development.

rizalp said:

Well, maybe we couldn't have 800Mbps form DSL, but it's sure a viable solution to people who live in the last mile. As we know, the standard copper wires network, is broader than fiber or cable.

TorturedChaos, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

CenturyLink is doing bonded pairs where I living, giving 26mpbs connections and up, which is pretty good for the area I live in. But there is no way in hell I'm going to go back to dealing with CenturyLink/CenturyTel - those guys are jerks.

As for this new "phantom" bonded pairs it sounds like a great idea, but has many others have said it needs a bit better range. But its good to see improved ways to use the copper. Just wish the US would put down fiber faster -_-

jason4832 said:

The Point is how affordable can these speeds be?

TuesdayExpress said:

I would love to see this rolled out in the near-to-medium future. Here in Baltimore we're limited in choice to Comcast and Verizon DSL, which is no real contest in terms of speed offered. Absent fiber rollout, this would provide a needed shot in the arm to local HSI competition.

jjbeard926 said:

anshrew said:

I was under the impression that DSL used the old copper phone lines while Cable "BroadBand" used fiber optics, or at the very least something better than copper.

Cable internet runs over your coaxial cable, the same as TV signals. It doesn't use traditional copper wires, instead coax is 1 copper wire that is thicker and has much more shielding on it than traditional copper wiring. The coax cable runs both the TV signal and the data down this 1 very thick wire and splits it out based on the frequency the signal is using. So you can transmit a TV signal at x mhz and a data signal at y mhz at the same time and it parses the data out of the TV signal. This allows for very high speeds because the signals do not require one signal to stop before accepting the next one, in other words it doesn't have to worry about collision domain management. Once you get the signal to the modem though all the network is done using normal Ethernet and IEEE 802.x architecture.

But, the main strength of cable internet has been their ability to best the speeds of DSL but factors of 5 to 10 in most areas. If 100+MB/s DSL becomes readily abailable it could spell doom for cable internet. Most people I know don't like the cable companies and would rather not use them and they do tend to be pricier. But for example in my area DSL is still limited to 1.5MB/s and the highest speed available over DSL within 20 miles of me is only 5MB/s (though advertised as 7 the average is actually lower than 5, but I'm being generous).

frodough said:

great news! always hoping something will bring some real competition to cable so timewarner / comcast wont have their regional monopoly, at least less comfortable.

Jibberish18 said:

rebelflag said:

People need to be more positive about technology moving forward. It might not be perfect but it is a step in the right direction. Don't forget it was only a little over 100 years ago that cars were slower than horses, until the technology got further development.

I don't think that people aren't excited about it. I just think that people such as ourselves, like to know more about technologies as they're presented. We're all technically inclined here to some degree, otherwise we wouldn't be commenting here. And you know, that most companies will only reveal the pros to something but never the cons. So your job is to always be skeptical of something until it is implemented and full proof. Otherwise, companies would be rich from your paycheck and you'd just be a sucker.

nismo91 said:

kudos to Jibberish18!

Lokalaskurar Lokalaskurar said:

Even though copper will be tough competitor to beat; the speed of light (in a vacuum) beats all still. Fiber will evolve, and eventually (probably) take over compleately.

jjbeard926 said:

rebelflag said:

People need to be more positive about technology moving forward. It might not be perfect but it is a step in the right direction. Don't forget it was only a little over 100 years ago that cars were slower than horses, until the technology got further development.

I think in general people are positive about it. But we've all seen vaporware and we've all seen technology promise things it couldn't deliver. Speaking of which, where's my jetpack???

Anyway, it's a healthy dose of realism you're seeing here. It will most likely be years before this is practical for use, but if it can be practical for real world use and get a good roll out this would mean some real competition in the internet service industry. And competition is good for the consumer.

crzydave said:

I would just be happy if my ISP provided me what i should be getting, but alas it is not. While I would like to make the transition to fiber, 1 its too expensive, 2 its not even provided where I live. Perhaps this new technology will make it possible to get some decent speeds.

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