Google sandboxes Flash in Chrome, adds WebGL support

By on December 18, 2010, 6:02 PM
Google has decided that while the company is going to embrace Adobe Flash in its Chrome browser, it is not going to let the plug-in introduce all sorts of security vulnerabilities. To minimize the risks posed by Flash, the search giant has released a new beta version of the Chrome browser for Windows which sandboxes Flash and other extensions; sandboxing will come to the Mac and Linux versions soon.

Sandboxing isolates applications so that malware doesn't spread beyond the insecure webpage to other parts of your computer. It's an additional layer of protection to further guard against malicious pages that try to hijack your computer or steal your private information. Plug-ins are a huge security problem for browser vendors, and this is Google's attempt to contain them.

The latest beta also adds a feature called Chrome Instant, which you can enable to load web pages that you frequently visit as soon as you start typing a URL. If your default search engine supports it, search results will also appear instantly as you type in queries.

Last but not least, the beta includes support for WebGL, a new Web technology for bringing hardware-accelerated 3D graphics to the browser. It's a 3D graphics API for JavaScript, based on the OpenGL ES 2.0 API, that developers can use to create fully 3D apps for the Web.





User Comments: 7

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princeton princeton said:

And apple didn't do this because? Well my Vibrant does flash so I don't really give.

Nima304 said:

I might go switch to Chrome now.

Guest said:

The real securiy risk is Google. They give out your wireless MAC's GPS location.

z0phi3l said:

Guest said:

The real securiy risk is Google. They give out your wireless MAC's GPS location.

And as long as you are using good security it does nothing, now if you fail and have an open connection, you deserve whatever/whoever gets in

fpsgamerJR62 said:

In the past, I wouldn't touch beta software because it was often not stable enough for daily use. Google has redefined the nature of beta software by giving us software that is constantly evolving and yet is surprisingly stable enough for daily personal or even office use. That is why Google 9 Beta is my main browser.

Didou Didou, Bowtie extraordinair!, said:

You don't need to be running the latest bleeding edge beta or developer version, there's a stable version which is currently running version 8.

SNGX1275 SNGX1275, TS Forces Special, said:

And apple didn't do this because? Well my Vibrant does flash so I don't really give.

Didn't do this for what? The phone? - Just because its sandboxed doesn't fix crashes and it doesn't make it any faster or drain battery any slower.

For their Macs? - I don't know why, but they could only do it with their browser, not Firefox, or Opera, or the other 3rd party browsers. But that really doesn't have anything to do with Apple's decision to not ship an outdated version of Flash with their OS - Instead letting the user decide if they want it, and if so, they can just get the new one, just like how its always been in Windows.

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