Sandy Bridge processors on sale at Malaysian retailers

By on December 20, 2010, 5:29 PM
Intel's Sandy Bridge processors aren't due for release until early 2011, likely coinciding with January's Consumer Electronics Show (CES), but some retailers have jumped the gun. According to Lowyat.net, Malaysian retailers Compuzone, StarTec and Viewnet have begun selling several versions of the next-generation chips along with LGA 1155 motherboards.

The retailers have listed six Sandy Bridge processors for sale, including the 2.8GHz Core i5 2300 ($185), 3.10GHz 2400 ($195), 3.3GHz 2500, 3.3GHz 2500K, as well as the 3.4GHz Core i7 2600 ($300) and 2600K. If you're curious, the 'K' versions feature an unlocked multiplier for easier overclocking. We don't see a price for these yet, but you can expect to pay a premium.


Lowyat.net also discovered a few photos of Sandy Bridge chips and motherboards on Compuzone's Facebook page, but they appear to have been removed or blocked from public view. We're not sure if the retailers have received clearance from Intel, but it wouldn't be the first time a major tech product was launched prematurely -- especially in Asian markets.




User Comments: 14

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princeton princeton said:

I wonder if they were just listed by accident or if the cpus have actually been manufactured. Probably the former.

KG363 KG363 said:

What is it with leaks in Asia?

Prosercunus said:

Makes me wonder if it is a repackaged last gen processor with sandy bridge attached to it. I am not saying it is impossible, I am simply saying I am pretty skeptical on most tech news coming out of any part of Asia in regards to the legitimacy of hardware.

Guest said:

Intel did not give any clearance to retailers over here at Malaysia to start selling them. So they are basically selling it only to those who specifically asks for them. Quite a number of 1155 motherboards are on sale too.

HaMsTeYr HaMsTeYr said:

These processors are Made in Malaysia, so I wouldn't be surprised... Besides, I don't live too far away from Low Yat so if I wanted to I could grab one hahaha

Now, if only I was using an Intel board here :X

@Prosercunus: The hardware in Malaysia is pretty genuine as far as I'm concerned, having lived here for most part of my life. Its hard to find counterfeits infact... I don't even know where to get them even if I tried lol.

Of course, this is a different matter altogether with the streets of China..

Prosercunus said:

hamsteyr said:

These processors are Made in Malaysia, so I wouldn't be surprised... Besides, I don't live too far away from Low Yat so if I wanted to I could grab one hahaha

Now, if only I was using an Intel board here :X

@Prosercunus: The hardware in Malaysia is pretty genuine as far as I'm concerned, having lived here for most part of my life. Its hard to find counterfeits infact... I don't even know where to get them even if I tried lol.

Of course, this is a different matter altogether with the streets of China..

That is interesting, and yes I was more referring to counterfeit and underhanded consumer products. It was more of a question on who were the stores suppliers.

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

@Pros & hamsteyr

AMD and Intel both manufacture significant quantities of their products in China & Malaysia, so if we were to believe y our arguments, we may have to at least doubt them as well?

That doesn't mean there may be counterfeit items on sale out there, but I think this problem has been very much controlled since Intel stopped selling unlocked processors way back in 90s.

Prosercunus said:

Archean said:

@Pros & hamsteyr

AMD and Intel both manufacture significant quantities of their products in China & Malaysia, so if we were to believe y our arguments, we may have to at least doubt them as well?

That doesn't mean there may be counterfeit items on sale out there, but I think this problem has been very much controlled since Intel stopped selling unlocked processors way back in 90s.

Well I understand your train of thought, it is not as simple as that. I am talking about people repackaging older processors and putting them in a certain type of boxing.

Guest said:

that the place i bought my asus lappy....LOL!!

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Ah that is more like a 'total fraud' .... I don't think bigger stores would do that, perhaps smaller shops/retailers may be indulging in such practices.

HaMsTeYr HaMsTeYr said:

Yes, you gotta know where to buy your hardware... Anything who is worth being called tech savvy in Malaysia know to get their hardware from places like low Yat plaza.

As for reboxing, I don't know if it's that simple. I won't overlook the idea of counterfeits, but I don't see how it's worth it, plus most stores have a 1 week minimum instore warranty, meaning a direct 1 to one change

Guest said:

i don't think this sandy bridge processor is counterfeit or whatsoever because this retailers is well known across Malaysia and i myself have bought a lot from them yet doesn't have any problem from their goods...;)

Prosercunus said:

Indeed. It is probably legit, I just remember newegg.com and a few other retailers getting fake i7s (or was it another processor?) not to long ago and it was like a reboxed C2D or something crazy like that. Anyway it came out of Asia, probably not Malaysia though.

hellokitty[hk] hellokitty[hk], I'm a TechSpot Evangelist, said:

I wonder if they were just listed by accident or if the cpus have actually been manufactured. Probably the former.

They've almost certainly already been manufactured...

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