Weekend tech reading: Sony brings PSN back online

By on May 15, 2011, 2:36 PM

Sony brings PSN back online, new security measures in place Sony Online Entertainment brought its PlayStation Network back online in parts of Europe and the U.S. Saturday following a three-week outage resulting from the hacking of the network by unknown individuals, the company said on the PlayStation blog. The restoration of PSN service requires a firmware update on PS3 consoles and requires users to change their passwords. PCMag

Amazon server said to be used in Sony atttack Amazon's Web Services cloud- computing unit was used by hackers in last month’s attack against Sony Corp. (6758)’s online entertainment systems, according to a person with knowledge of the matter. Hackers using an alias signed up to rent a server through Amazon’s EC2 service and launched the attack from there, said the person, who requested anonymity because the information is confidential. Bloomberg

Netflix: Metered broadband a pure cash grab Netflix initially tried to downplay metered billing as a threat to their business, though in recent months the company has gotten increasingly vocal about the issue -- especially after launching streaming video service in Canada and running face first into that country's low caps and high per byte overages. DSLReports

Mozilla halts updates for Firefox 3.5 Mozilla is currently preparing to phase out Firefox 3.5 and said that it will not release further major updates for the browser version. There was no exact date for the end-of-life given, but Mozilla said that it wants to phase out 3.5 as quickly as possible and move its 12 million users to versions 3.6 or 4.0. ConceivablyTech

RIM recalls at least 900 faulty BlackBerry PlayBooks, here are the serial numbers We found the BlackBerry PlayBook to be a pretty solid piece of hardware, but it seems there was a problem batch -- an inside source tells us that nearly 1,000 faulty tablets were shipped to Staples, and now they're being recalled. Engadget

Why I (and probably 600,000 others) stopped playing World of Warcraft Blizzard’s flagship online game, World of Warcraft, shed around 600,000 players in the last quarter even though it released one of its most successful expansion packs yet. Blizzard chief executive Mike Morhaime said players blitzed through the content faster than the developers expected. GamesBeat

Seven tech trade-offs worth making Buying gadgets can sometimes be like buying a car; it requires sorting through options. Do you go for the navigation package or the rear-seat entertainment system? The faster processor or more memory? NY Times

Confessions of a computer repairman When your PC breaks down – assuming you can’t fix it yourself – the first port of call is often a professional repairer who might just be able to rescue that vital data, restore the operating system without losing your photos, or get that graphics card working again. PCPro

Slaying the cable monster: Why HDMI brands don't matter You've probably experienced this when shopping for a new HDTV: A store clerk sidles up and offers to help. He then points you toward the necessary HDMI cables to go with your new television. And they're expensive. PCMag

Perl 5.14 A new version of Perl, 5.14, was officially released on 14th May following the successful test period, including the testing of release candidates. This is the first release of Perl 5 using the new annual schedule. The Perl Foundation

Gabe Newell on Valve The PC games pioneer bares all on Valve's unique dev culture, and shares his grand plan for the future. Develop




User Comments: 5

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Tanstar said:

Since The NY Times seems to not want comments I'll leave my comment on the "Seven tech trade-offs worth making" here.

Most of the article is well thought out. However . . .

"But one thing you do not have to spend much time looking up is a television?s refresh rate, measured in hertz. That tells you how many times per second the TV refreshes the image on its display. A 60 Hz television refreshes its image 60 times a second; a 120 Hz does it 120 times a second. Many ? if not most ? TVs now have a refresh rate of 120 Hz, and more expensive models are faster than that, refreshing the image 240 times per second. And while twice as fast is theoretically better, your eyes would be hard pressed to tell the difference. That is not a tradeoff, that is a ripoff."

This is simply BS. A LCD HDTV with 60Hz refresh looks like trash when watching sports or races. Upgrade to 120Hz and you'll see a big difference. No idea if 240Hz is overkill or not, but 120Hz isn't. Perhaps that's what he meant, but he never makes any distinction.

Guest said:

psn network still down here in Wv. I did get a patch but I am unable to connect.

Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

PSN is up and working here in the UK, the only 3 guys left at work with a PS3 all confirmed they can play again.

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I guess the rest just left the building burty?

Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Archean said:

I guess the rest just left the building burty?

Lol! but no, the rest got xboxes or are PC gamers

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