China shut down 1.3 million websites in 2010

By on July 14, 2011, 4:00 PM

After a couple of years of tighter and stricter Internet regulation by Chinese officials, including a crackdown on pornographic websites in 2009, the results are in. The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences said there were 41 percent fewer websites at the end of 2010 than a year earlier. More specifically, the Chinese government shut down 1.3 million websites in China last year.

Liu Ruisheng, the academy's researcher, insists China has a "high level of freedom of online speech." He pointed out that despite the declining number of websites, the number of web pages actually rose to 60 billion during 2010. This represented a 79 percent increase over the previous year. "This means our content is getting stronger, while our supervision is getting more strict and more regulated," he told the BBC.

Critics of Chinese regulatory policy will of course disagree. Content will increase as time goes by regardless of whether the number of websites is growing or falling. More content on fewer websites does not, however, demonstrate a free Internet marketplace, and it should not be something that is celebrated.

China's web censorship is affectionately known as the Great Firewall of China. The country uses multiple methods to control the Web: IP blocking, DNS filtering and redirection, URL filtering, Packet filtering, as well as connection resets. Many foreign news websites are blocked as are popular social networks.

China's Internet censorship is not the best thing in the world, but at least the country's citizens have some form of access. Could you imagine if the government decided to turn off the Web in the world's most populous country, and the one with the largest Internet population?




User Comments: 13

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ihaveaname said:

For what it's worth, I read the article about China blocking news about Egypt's revolution on Techspot ... when I was in China. And believe it or not, there are many, many Facebook users in China; the 'firewall' isn't that hard to break.

madboyv1, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Could you imagine if the government decided to turn off the Web in the world's most populous country, and the one with the largest Internet population?

There would be less spam, less "alleged hacking," and less currency farming in MMOs , just to name a couple immediate, somewhat positive results.

Guest said:

I hate that I can't access IMDB.com here in China. I could care less about facebook, and actually it gives me an excuse for not using it. Not being able to watch uTube videos can also be annoying. I can still find plenty of porn ;)

Guest said:

Pfff... get a VPN and you're good to go. Although thinking about it, most of the VPN IPs are probably blocked. I'd still find one though.

R3DP3NGUIN R3DP3NGUIN said:

VPS is the best way!!!

Guest said:

in China, the VPN is expensive to people...some of the guys who wanna surf FACEBOOK, YOUTUBE, TWITTER and etc will use the FreeGate or other similar softwares.

Guest said:

Yeah... because porn was really China's biggest problem. *sigh*

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

Yeah... because porn was really China's biggest problem. *sigh*
Porn wasn't always as freely available or legal in the US as it is now.

Larry Flint, the publisher of "Hustler" magazine, argued before the Supreme Court, that porn should be legal on the basis of, "freedom of expression". The argument attached itself to the First Amendment of the constitution. He was successful, and the rest is history. Criminal statues under Title 18 USC, define the boundaries for such materials.

At one point, pornographic video was required to have, "redeeming social value", or "artistic merit" to be allowed. In other words, the male star had to dress up as a policeman, and come to arrest the "heroine", before it could be marketed. (the "plot", as it were...)

Given that "freedom of expression" is a "problem" that Chinese officials wish to squelch, it is understandable that pornography falls under the governmental boot.

gwailo247, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

captaincranky said:

At one point, pornographic video was required to have, "redeeming social value", or "artistic merit" to be allowed. In other words, the male star had to dress up as a policeman, and come to arrest the "heroine", before it could be marketed. (the "plot", as it were...)

Given that "freedom of expression" is a "problem" that Chinese officials wish to squelch, it is understandable that pornography falls under the governmental boot.

Ah, so what they need is more of sexy farmer girl unable to meet her quota goes to beg for mercy from the equally sexy district chief? After which they are both captured, put on a show trial exposing their corruption and shot?

Renrew Renrew said:

Communism at it's best. U go China

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

Ah, so what they need is more of sexy farmer girl unable to meet her quota goes to beg for mercy from the equally sexy district chief? After which they are both captured, put on a show trial exposing their corruption and shot?
Not to mention we finally get to see what's under the judges robes. I'm betting not much....

gwailo247, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Not to mention we finally get to see what's under the judges robes. I'm betting not much....

I would think that in regards to casting they would take full advantage of their numerous male population and find enough specimens on the desirable side of the bell curve in order to put on a commendable appearance.

Guest said:

this is scary!

we should be free, with a free, open internet for any and all to enjoy!

if you dont like certain material simply opt out! do not shut down ideas and the spread of information please

freedom, peace & love

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