SkyDrive app arrives on Xbox 360, refused by iOS app store

By on December 11, 2012, 3:00 PM

Microsoft SkyDrive program manager Dan Somrack has informed blog readers that SkyDrive will be making an appearance on Xbox 360 consoles. Microsoft is slated to begin pushing the app to consumers after 10:00 AM PST on Tuesday, so by the time you read this, your Xbox 360 may already have access to SkyDrive.

SkyDrive is Microsoft's answer to cloud storage services like DropBox and Google Drive. It provides a centralized way to store and access files across many different computers and devices. Although native support remains absent from Linux, the service is currently available for most other platforms: Mac OS X, Windows (Vista and higher), Windows Phone, Android and iOS.

Somrack said the marriage of SkyDrive and Xbox 360 opens up numerous possibilities, but his team focused on user feedback to determine the most valuable features. One such feature allows photos -- when snapped with a Windows Phone -- to show up on an Xbox-equipped TV almost instantaneously. Another desirable feature to make the cut is the ability to create photo slideshows and have them play back on a television.

While Microsoft is no doubt pleased to offer SkyDrive on the Xbox 360, not everything is fuzzy puppies and colorful rainbows for the cloud storage service.

According to The Next Web, Apple and Microsoft are currently locked in a dispute over the 30 percent rule. Purportedly, Microsoft refuses to let Apple skim 30 percent of its in-app SkyDrive subscription revenue. As a result, Apple will not publish the latest SkyDrive app update which offers users a way to upgrade their SkyDrive's storage space at a premium.

The 30 percent rule is simple: Apple gets a 30 percent cut of any sales made through its app store. The same also applies to any purchases made within the app itself.

While not everyone agrees on how fair that revenue split is, it's essentially the same percentage and practice adopted by Android Market, BlackBerry World and even Microsoft's own Windows Store




User Comments: 6

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3 people like this | Vrmithrax Vrmithrax, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Ok, so the 30% rule is appealing in a broad sense, with a flat rate applying to everyone... But, seriously, is Apple demanding 30% of the storage fee revenue for a cloud service just because they have an iOS version of the client? The revenue is for storage and hosting services, of which Apple has exactly 0% involvement or overhead responsibilities. That's the kind of area that their 30% rule fails miserably in.

Quick solution for Microsoft: take out any in-app payment options from only the iOS versions. The user can sign into their account via browser, or any of the other SkyDrive apps, and pay their storage fees or whatever transactions are required. That does 2 things: makes it impossible for Apple to have any claim on revenue (since no purchases are made in an iOS app), and puts all of the inconvenience blame squarely in the lap of Apple (if they make sure to point all complaints towards the iTunes regulations).

Guest said:

Vermi is always right...

Darth Shiv Darth Shiv said:

Quick solution for Microsoft: take out any in-app payment options from only the iOS versions. The user can sign into their account via browser, or any of the other SkyDrive apps, and pay their storage fees or whatever transactions are required. That does 2 things: makes it impossible for Apple to have any claim on revenue (since no purchases are made in an iOS app), and puts all of the inconvenience blame squarely in the lap of Apple (if they make sure to point all complaints towards the iTunes regulations).

Sounds like a plan!

Camikazi said:

Quick solution for Microsoft: take out any in-app payment options from only the iOS versions. The user can sign into their account via browser, or any of the other SkyDrive apps, and pay their storage fees or whatever transactions are required. That does 2 things: makes it impossible for Apple to have any claim on revenue (since no purchases are made in an iOS app), and puts all of the inconvenience blame squarely in the lap of Apple (if they make sure to point all complaints towards the iTunes regulations).

MS tried that and Apple said no, either they get money or the app does not get approved basically.

1 person liked this | Vrmithrax Vrmithrax, TechSpot Paladin, said:

MS tried that and Apple said no, either they get money or the app does not get approved basically.

Bah, not surprising... So, if I was Microsoft, I'd make sure iTunes is not allowed on the Windows Store until they get a 30% cut of every transaction that is performed through a Windows iTunes app... See how those greedy bastards like that!

Chazz said:

MS tried that and Apple said no, either they get money or the app does not get approved basically.

Bah, not surprising... So, if I was Microsoft, I'd make sure iTunes is not allowed on the Windows Store until they get a 30% cut of every transaction that is performed through a Windows iTunes app... See how those greedy bastards like that!

Surely they'd be forced to pay 2 billion euros by the EC if they did that.

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