Google has no plans to open retail stores, according to Andy Rubin

By on February 26, 2013, 5:30 PM

Last week a source cited as extremely reliable told 9to5Google that the search giant was planning to erect standalone stores across the US similar to retail locations currently in operation by Apple and Microsoft. As it turns out, that’s not the case at all according to another reliable source – the person in charge of running Android, Andy Rubin.

During a meeting with reporters at Mobile World Congress, the executive said Google had no plans for retail stores and had nothing to announce on the subject. He pointed out that up until a few years ago, consumers needed to touch and feel devices before making a purchase. That’s no longer the case, however, as they can now make a decision based on reviews and talking to friends. Customers don’t need to go into a store and physically hold a product any longer.

Sameer Samat, head of Google Shopping, essentially echoed the same sentiments late last year but given the breakneck speed of technology and the industry surrounding it, plans can – and often do – change in the blink of an eye.

Even still, the idea of a Google retail store does sound appealing, especially as we traverse through 2013. With premium offerings like the Chomebook Pixel and Google Glass both slated for release this year, a storefront could be the perfect outlet to let customers try these high-end products before buying. After all, it’s one thing to buy a $200 tablet sight unseen but it’s another thing altogether to throw down over a grand on something you’ve never seen or experienced in person.




User Comments: 5

Got something to say? Post a comment
Guest said:

Why would they open retail stores? Brick and mortar stores are all moving towards online sales. Soon all we'll have left is fast food restaurants and Walmarts, everything else will be online.

Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

As they can now make a decision based on reviews and talking to friends. Customers don?t need to go into a store and physically hold a product any longer.

Maybe he's referring to himself & a few select people. That's not the case with me or anybody I know.

Or maybe, just maybe he received a late night phone call from one of Apples torpedoes advising them of the health & financial risk if competing with them.

Guest said:

Or maybe, just maybe he received a late night phone call from one of Apples torpedoes advising them of the health & financial risk if competing with them.

I highly doubt that; android is just as competitive as apple and offers superior products at a cheaper price. Look at the current market saturation for smart phones / OS and tell me that isn't true.

I own an iPod. iPods were superior products without any REAL competition. (Zune lol)

I personally would never buy an apple tablet, computer or phone after the original release of the iPhone. Why? I refuse to pay more for a product with lower specs, that inherently gives you less options than an open ended platform like android.

There is a demographic for apple (obviously) and that's fine, far be it from me to stop another person from buying what they want. But I believe that as people become more proficient with technology the appeal of simple and streamlined products (like apple) will diminish.

Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

I'm kidding of course.

MilwaukeeMike said:

As they can now make a decision based on reviews and talking to friends. Customers don?t need to go into a store and physically hold a product any longer.

Maybe he's referring to himself & a few select people. That's not the case with me or anybody I know.

Or maybe, just maybe he received a late night phone call from one of Apples torpedoes advising them of the health & financial risk if competing with them.

Yeah, no kidding... maybe this guy hasn't heard of a store called Best Buy. People LOVE going to the store and checking out a product and then going home and buying it cheaper online. They even thought up a word for it... 'Showrooming' And don't forget, Best Buy is STILL the number one retailer of computers and smart phones, even with 'everyone' buying things online.

Who wants to trust some reviewer's opinion when you can try it out for yourself?

Google's problem is they only thing they sell are advertisements. A Google store would make you log in with your google account when you walked in so it could adjust the ads in the store accordingly.

Load all comments...

Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...
Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.