Kickstarter dress shirt can be worn for 100 days without washing

By on May 2, 2013, 7:00 PM
kickstarter, wool, wool  prince, shirt

Washing clothes is such a drag. Just imagine how much time you could save if you didn’t have to bother with such a time consuming task. That thought will soon become a reality for some if 24-year-old marketing grad Mac Bishop has anything to say about it.

That’s because he recently took to Kickstarter to fund what he calls “the better button-down” – a shirt he claims is wrinkle proof and can be worn odor-free for 100 days straight. How does he know that? Simple – he wore one of the shirts for 100 days straight without washing it.

In an interview with CBS News, Bishop said he ran four miles in the shirt, biked five miles in it and even tossed it on after a basketball game. Even through all that, it didn’t smell or look worn. The secret is in the material the shirt is constructed of: wool.

No, this isn’t the same itchy wool that your grandma used to knit those dreadful sweaters when you were a kid. Bishop spent six months developing the trademarked Cotton-Soft wool fabric using the finest shirting yarn typically reserved for the luxury fashion industry. The material is said to be naturally anti-wrinkle, odor-fighting and lasts six times longer than cotton.

To turn the dream into a reality, Bishop turned to Kickstarter with a goal of raising $30,000. With 19 days to go in the campaign, he’s already raised nearly $300,000 thanks to the generosity of more than 2,100 backers. The project will be funded on May 22 with an estimated delivery date of March 2014.




User Comments: 42

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VitalyT VitalyT said:

Stupidest idea.

If sweat and dirt do not manifest through odor or visually, they still accumulate just as fast, as do the harmful bacteria with it, perfect ground for skin diseases. Thank you very much.

Win7Dev said:

I read a little more about this and the material is good at preventing the growth of bacteria because of it's surface. It's a little bit slick so dirt and bacteria cannot easily stick to it.

VitalyT VitalyT said:

I read a little more about this and the material is good at preventing the growth of bacteria because of it's surface. It's a little bit slick so dirt and bacteria cannot easily stick to it.

Bacteria can only be counteracted efficiently by chemicals and thermally. The surface may reduce their overall density, but it cannot stop the growth. You still will end up with pockets of bacteria grown way beyond health limits.

4 people like this | nickstricks007 nickstricks007 said:

Stupidest idea.

If sweat and dirt do not manifest through odor or visually, they still accumulate just as fast, as do the harmful bacteria with it, perfect ground for skin diseases. Thank you very much.

Obviously the control test he did was pretty extreme. I don't think he actually intends for people to do the same as he did. I can see this being used by those business professionals that spend their days in an office and might not have time to wash their own clothes or bring them to the cleaners. Or for people that only like to wear dress shirts like that on occasions, you can wear it once for say, Christmas and hang it back up in the closet and leave it there until Valentines for example. I think your comment was just a little short sighted.

2 people like this | dms96960 said:

Hmmm. Notice he is making a shirt and not underwear.

1 person liked this | JC713 JC713 said:

Awesome. Too bad that is pretty unsanitary to think of.

VitalyT VitalyT said:

Obviously the control test he did was pretty extreme.

On the contrary, his test is absolutely not credible. A credible test would include a medical test and observation of what is happening between the shirt and his skin as he continues wearing it. And those would be gruesome results.

Just so, I grew in a family where both parents are doctors, with one in dermatology, and even though I fell out the family trade, I think I know very well what I'm telling you here.

VitalyT VitalyT said:

Awesome. Too bad that is pretty unsanitary to think of.

Extremely, in fact.

2 people like this | m4a4 m4a4 said:

Wow, VitalyT certainly has something against a shirt that he knows little about... almost like it insulted his mother...

Anyways, it sounds quite convenient for those who don't like to or have time to iron their good shirts. And under normal wear sounds perfectly acceptable unwashed for a while...

1 person liked this | VitalyT VitalyT said:

Wow, VitalyT certainly has something against a shirt that he knows little about... almost like it insulted his mother...

Anyways, it sounds quite convenient for those who don't like to or have time to iron their good shirts. And under normal wear sounds perfectly acceptable unwashed for a while...

You're taking it too far yourself

I will respond in kind with an old military saying that goes "A man who doesn't wash his own socks is not really a man".

P.S. The cost of laziness has always been far greater than simple doing, is the lesson the lazy never learns.

VitalyT VitalyT said:

Funny, but just watching Game of Thrones reminded of the Great Unsullied - now that sounds like a good trademark for those who wants to wear this

davislane1 davislane1 said:

All I want is the wrinkle free. Not requiring a wash for 100 days is a bonus that few would ever exploit, myself included.

VitalyT VitalyT said:

All I want is the wrinkle free.

Those things have been available for a while...

  1. [link]
  2. [link]
  3. [link]
Tekkaraiden Tekkaraiden said:

Can I get a refund if it doesn't live up to its claim?

JC713 JC713 said:

Can I get a refund if it doesn't live up to its claim?

You can get much more than a refund. You can get a lawsuit for "false advertising".

davislane1 davislane1 said:

@VitalyT I have a couple Van Heusen wrinkle frees and one by Perry Ellis. They're nice shirts, but they aren't wrinkle free so much as they are more wrinkle resistant than ordinary cottons & poly blends. My comment was geared towards an actual wrinkle free shirt that performs above and beyond standard selections.

VitalyT VitalyT said:

Can I get a refund if it doesn't live up to its claim?

It may not cover a bill from your dermatologist

VitalyT VitalyT said:

@VitalyT I have a couple Van Heusen wrinkle frees and one by Perry Ellis. They're nice shirts, but they aren't wrinkle free so much as they are more wrinkle resistant than ordinary cottons & poly blends. My comment was geared towards an actual wrinkle free shirt that performs above and beyond standard selections.

My understanding - they are wrinkle-free between the washes, or at least till the first wash, not that they will remain wrinkle-free if you opt not to wash them when needed.

JC713 JC713 said:

@VitalyT I have a couple Van Heusen wrinkle frees and one by Perry Ellis. They're nice shirts, but they aren't wrinkle free so much as they are more wrinkle resistant than ordinary cottons & poly blends. My comment was geared towards an actual wrinkle free shirt that performs above and beyond standard selections.

It is just a gimmick, it isnt that effective.

davislane1 davislane1 said:

@VitalyT Your understanding is correct but it's a bit of a false advertisement in my experience. They hold up very well underneath something like a blazer or a sweater (minimal creasing), but post-wash they must be ironed otherwise the fabric will have a "rough" look to it. It's much better than you get with ordinary cotton, but still requires the same prep.

VitalyT VitalyT said:

@VitalyT Your understanding is correct but it's a bit of a false advertisement in my experience. They hold up very well underneath something like a blazer or a sweater (minimal creasing), but post-wash they must be ironed otherwise the fabric will have a "rough" look to it. It's much better than you get with ordinary cotton, but still requires the same prep.

It is more of a question to women here, I'm no expert. I never could get my shirts looking as good after thorough washing + ironing as when they were new, either I suck at it or it is just not possible...

1 person liked this | davislane1 davislane1 said:

It is more of a question to women here, I'm no expert. I never could get my shirts looking as good after thorough washing + ironing as when they were new, either suck at it or it is just not possible...

This is 50% how you iron the shirt and 50% the shirt itself. Depending on the materials the shirt is made with, shrinkage of the thread and cloth fibers as a result of the first wash will remove any chances you have of making the shirt look like new. If you're lucky and get a shirt that washes well, everything else has to do with how you iron it. Typically, steam on the appropriate temperature setting will make the shirt look like new. You just have to watch how you go about refining creases and keep appropriate tension on the fabric. Some people like to use starch during the ironing process, but it causes the fabric to look unnaturally stiff.

Ranger12 Ranger12 said:

Wow, VitalyT certainly has something against a shirt that he knows little about... almost like it insulted his mother...

Invent a shirt that insults people's mothers and I guarantee you it will sell like hotcakes.

There does seem to be something wrong with this. Dirt and bacteria can get lodged in fabric, not simply on it, when perspiration is absorbed by the fabric and when you get dirt and bacteria in the fabric your in for some stank. So perhaps the fabric doesn't absorb any moisture and it feels like you're wearing a trash bag. If it uses the, "finest shirting yarn typically reserved for the luxury fashion industry" then I imagine it will also come at the highest price typically reserved for the luxury fashion industry.

I call gimmick. But for what it's worth I'm in a bad mood atm.

1 person liked this | VitalyT VitalyT said:

Invent a shirt that insults people's mothers and I guarantee you it will sell like hotcakes.

I saw one with this once:

Not sure if it sold well though...

VitalyT VitalyT said:

This is 50% how you iron the shirt and 50% the shirt itself. Depending on the materials the shirt is made with, shrinkage of the thread and cloth fibers as a result of the first wash will remove any chances you have of making the shirt look like new. If you're lucky and get a shirt that washes well, everything else has to do with how you iron it. Typically, steam on the appropriate temperature setting will make the shirt look like new. You just have to watch how you go about refining creases and keep appropriate tension on the fabric. Some people like to use starch during the ironing process, but it causes the fabric to look unnaturally stiff.

Thank you! Too much of a science to my mind. I can calculate primes from 1 to 101 under a minute in my head, but the finesse of cloth ironing will delude me forever. Easier to get your wife do it for you or just buy a new shirt.

davislane1 davislane1 said:

Thank you! Too much of a science to my mind. I can calculate primes from 1 to 101 under a minute in my head, but the finesse of cloth ironing will delude me forever. Easier to get your wife do it for you or just buy a new shirt.

Women like that still exist? My last girlfriend dumped me a few weeks after I made a joke about her doing laundry -- a JOKE!!! ...I envy you, sir! :P

1 person liked this | VitalyT VitalyT said:

Women like that still exist? My last girlfriend dumped me a few weeks after I made a joke about her doing laundry -- a JOKE!!! ...I envy you, sir! :P

Wives do laundry, girlfriends don't Don't envy me, I buy new shirts instead.

Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

This is 50% how you iron the shirt and 50% the shirt itself. Depending on the materials the shirt is made with, shrinkage of the thread and cloth fibers as a result of the first wash will remove any chances you have of making the shirt look like new. If you're lucky and get a shirt that washes well, everything else has to do with how you iron it. Typically, steam on the appropriate temperature setting will make the shirt look like new. You just have to watch how you go about refining creases and keep appropriate tension on the fabric. Some people like to use starch during the ironing process, but it causes the fabric to look unnaturally stiff.

Thank you! Too much of a science to my mind. I can calculate primes from 1 to 101 under a minute in my head, but the finesse of cloth ironing will delude me forever. Easier to get your wife do it for you or just buy a new shirt.

Delude? Surely you mean elude. Then again, maybe not. Who the hell would want to wear a shirt for 100 days anyway?

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Delude? Surely you mean elude. Then again, maybe not. Who the hell would want to wear a shirt for 100 days anyway?
Apparently, Mac Bishop does.

1 person liked this | Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

Apparently, Mac Bishop does.

Apart from him. Kinda reminds me of my days in grade 8. In fact I enjoyed grade 8 so much I spent 7 years there.

TS-56336 TS-56336 said:

Sorry... I would not feel comfortable on wearing a shirt 100 days with out a wash. I wash underwear, pants, socks... Why not wash the shirt? Oh god. Wearing a 100 day unwashed shirt on a date or at work? Uh-uh. Is this for the slightly moneyed homeless? No thanks. I like my Tide smell.

2 people like this | cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I wash underwear, pants, socks... Why not wash the shirt?
I think the idea was to try one item first. those other items are next. O.O

LukeDJ LukeDJ said:

Cottonstop.com

2 people like this | gamoniac said:

Wait a sec... didn't you were that shirt yesterday? And the day before, and the day before, and the day before, and the.... WTH!!!

Razer said:

This shirt will be men's ultimate dream item!! Imagine, 100 days without washing* it because you're so lazy :p

(*) terms and conditions apply.

treeski treeski said:

Who woulda thought a clothing article would get so much attention on Techspot :P

TS-56336 TS-56336 said:

Who woulda thought a clothing article would get so much attention on Techspot :p

Because it's baffling at some point

RzmmDX said:

I am actually more concerned that a marketing grad knows so much about developing his own fabric...

Timonius Timonius said:

Cool, now the homeless can smell better and look better... >.>

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Cool, now the homeless can smell better and look better... >.>
Not possible!!

  1. The shirt will probably have a premium price.
  2. If the shirt is still in good condition, it wouldn't be offered as an option.
  3. It would take more than a shirt to make those conditions possible.
lipe123 said:

Awesome. Too bad that is pretty unsanitary to think of.

Extremely, in fact.

Really man you are being a germophobe here to the extreme.

Sounds to me like the typical "first world problem" type of person who has been indoctrinated with BS about germs and crap everywhere thats just waiting to pounce on you and kill you.

Here enjoy reading about the millions of germs and bacteria that live on you right now: [link]

Also the ad does NOT say that the user wont need to wash for 100 days, it just uses the natural water resistant properties of wool which means the surface of the wool fibers are almost always dry unless submerged in liquid. So as almost all bacteria/germs require moisture to survive this makes the shirt very resistant to that kind of problem.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wool#Uses

1 person liked this | JC713 JC713 said:

Wearing a shirt for 100 days without washing it is 100% disgusting. If you dont think that, I dont know what to tell you.

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