Netflix quietly adds 4K Ultra HD test clips ahead of full-scale rollout next year

By on November 2, 2013, 12:45 PM
netflix, reed hastings, ultra hd, ultra, 4k videos, test clips

Netflix recently added a half dozen or so 4K HD videos to their online catalog in preparation of a full-scale rollout in the coming months. The company has thus far only added some internal testing videos to the site although a spokesperson for Netflix said they have ambitions to launch Ultra HD next year.

To be specific, Netflix added seven 4K videos this past week. One clip, called El Fuente: 24 MP, is described as an example of 4K at 24 frames per second. The video showcases people riding on bikes, footage from a wholesale produce market and even kids playing in a water fountain. It’s obviously not riveting footage but the different scene scenarios are used to test the quality of Ultra HD under varying conditions.

During Netflix’s most recent earnings call, CEO Reed Hastings said his company wanted to be one of the primary 4K suppliers next year. When the company does officially launch Ultra HD, it’ll likely be with original content but it also wouldn’t be a shock to see the company land some TV shows or movies from their licensing partners, either.

It’s not uncommon for Netflix to quietly test new technologies like this among their public catalog. In the past, we’ve seen some mischievous members even leave mock reviews for test clips. One user even proclaimed one of the tests clips as the greatest story ever told. Either way, it’s good to see Netflix looking to the future and taking a leadership role in terms of 4K content.




User Comments: 7

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Guest said:

...also known as 'How else to waste the Internet bandwidth, while putting video store owners out of business.'

Netflix is owned by the Devil.

1 person liked this | Guest said:

Now everyone can have a chance at legally hitting their bandwidth cap halfway through the month!

1 person liked this | davislane1 davislane1 said:

...also known as 'How else to waste the Internet bandwidth, while putting video store owners out of business.'

Netflix is owned by the Devil.

Now we know the solution to the economic conundrum that's plagued economists and business owners for centuries. Why do businesses go out of business? O.O The Devil!!!!

davislane1 davislane1 said:

While 4K sounds awesome in theory, I don't see the application side from a video streaming perspective. I'm running on 100mb/s cable and full HD streams sometimes run into issues coming from Netflix. I can only imagine how painful a 4K stream would be on a bad day. Not to mention the need for a 4K display and the fact that such a high resolution would ruin the aesthetics of most sci-fi series and movies.

1 person liked this | Guest said:

Well your ISP is junk. I have an unlimited 120Mb connection and every day I have multiple sports streams at 720p (as many games that are playing). My wife streams 1080p content all day while I'm streaming my sports at the same time. Could be your router causing problems.

davislane1 davislane1 said:

Well your ISP is junk. I have an unlimited 120Mb connection and every day I have multiple sports streams at 720p (as many games that are playing). My wife streams 1080p content all day while I'm streaming my sports at the same time. Could be your router causing problems.

I laughed when I read this. To call my ISP 'junk' is to suggest that there's something redeemable about their service.

Guest said:

I can only imagine how painful a 4K stream would be on a bad day.

That's nothing compared to the pain of blowing your data cap allowance and triggering penalty fees on your monthly bills.

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