Adobe adds 3D printing support in Photoshop CC

By on January 16, 2014, 12:00 PM
adobe, photoshop, 3d printing, 3d printer, photochop cc

The latest update for Adobe’s Photoshop CC adds a new 3D printing tool that will help users take an existing model (either from a modeling tool, a 3D scanner or a blueprint they find online), polish it up a bit and help get it printed out.

The software now accepts five different 3D file formats: OBJ, STL, 3DS, Collada and KMZ. The company sends word that designers will be able to produce high-quality, high aesthetic and full-color 3D content using Photoshop CC. There’s also some nifty features built in as well. For example, Photoshop will automatically add in temporary support structures during the printing process so your model doesn’t collapse during printing.

Adobe’s vice president of products for its Creative Media Solutions team Winston Hendrickson said the new 3D print capabilities take the guesswork out of printing 3D models. Before today, he said, there was a gap between the content produced in 3D modeling tools and what 3D printers needed in order to deliver high quality results.

Once you’re done tweaking your masterpiece, there are a couple of different options in terms of printing. If you have your own desktop 3D printer, odds are that Photoshop CC will support it. That’s because Adobe has built in support for most popular 3D printers right into the software.

If you need to send off the work to a third party for printing, Adobe can help here as well. They’ve partnered with printing community and marketplace Shapeways and publishing service Sketchfab.




User Comments: 5

Got something to say? Post a comment
Guest said:

And how about adding support for Linux?

JC713 JC713 said:

I never knew Photoshop had so much potential.

Guest said:

And how about adding support for Linux?

If the lousy Linux zealots drop their insistence that Adobe (and other commercial vendors) should release their software as open source then Adobe will gladly provide support for Linux. Until then, run Photoshop on either Windows or Mac OS X.

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

So what is stopping Adobe from charging for software to run on Linux?

You make it sound as if software vendors can't charge for releasing software titles on Linux. If that is the case, I'll love it when Steam OS finally comes out and all the games are free. Come on think about what you are saying.

Guest said:

So what is stopping Adobe from charging for software to run on Linux?

You make it sound as if software vendors can't charge for releasing software titles on Linux. If that is the case, I'll love it when Steam OS finally comes out and all the games are free. Come on think about what you are saying.

Linux users have no problem paying for software. The real problem is that most of them, especially zealots don't want to pay for software that is proprietary in nature. That's what stopping Adobe and other proprietary vendors from releasing their products on Linux. Until the sane Linux users recognize their fellow anti-proprietary users as the real obstacles to Linux adoption and kick them to the curb, Linux Desktop will be stuck in the abyss for all eternity.

Load all comments...

Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...
Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.