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CPU fan.... FAILED!!! dun dun duuuun

By Jstroker007
Feb 4, 2004
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  1. Justin

    Justin TS Rookie Posts: 1,595



    That information is extremely outdated. I mean, 2001 style outdated, and in computer "years" that is a long time. AMD processors are no longer susceptible to the "heat death" in such fashion. You shouldn't be putting out years-old info as a tool for trying to teach, especially if newer technology renders it obsolete.

    And, the fried thunderbird did not reach 700 celcius, but 690 some Faernheit, which is roughly 300 C.

    However, none of that matters - Athlon XPs since the tbred-a have thermal protection. This includes tbred-b, barton, and AMD64.

    They do not have speed throttling ala pentium 4, however.
  2. Bug

    Bug TS Rookie Posts: 180

    Wow, thanks for the lesson. I'm now learned. How bout posting something to back up your statements so that we can all be awed by your teachings.

    About your posting: You shouldn't be putting out years-old info as a tool for trying to teach, especially if newer technology renders it obsolete.

    Response: In todays world, many people are still using "years-old" technology, so the info still applies.

    Anyways, not real professional. If you are going to correct someone, it is best to do it in a manner not to shoot people down. Thanks a million.
    Bug
  3. Bug

    Bug TS Rookie Posts: 180

    I apologize for my previous rant. I agree with Soul Harvester that the later processors have a built in technology to prevent overheating. The previous post was meant for everyone in general that may not own a new processor, such as a Duron or a first generation T-bird, up to the Barton and XPs. Heat is an issue that should be closely monitored with any processor, as it can decrease the life expectancy. Newer processors are built to run at higher tempuratures, but there is always a limit to how hot it will run before it breaks.

    Also, on a side note. Most new motherboards will also have a built in overheat alarm or compensation technology to save your proc. Even if the processor's overheat technology fails, there are usually other safe guards for those who have newer products.

    Bug
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