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Local Area Connection 169.254.xxx.xxx

By jnthnbgg
Jul 17, 2014
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  1. So I realize that this is my computer telling me that it is not getting a connection to the internet. So here is a basic diagram of my setup.

    ISP---->Cable Modem----->(New)Splitter----------> Asus wifi router (working)
    \--------->Desktop (169 IP) also connected to wifi
    My ISP is Charter Com. via a Cable Modem. From there I go into a TRENDnet ethernet switch/splitter. From there I have 1) cable that goes to my desktop 2) one cable to goes to the upper floor to the wifi router (Asus RT-N66U) The router is working fine and I am currently connected to it. I have replaced the TRENDnet Switch every ethernet cable except to Asus wifi router. This is where it gets stupid. I can disconnect the TRENDnet switch and plug in my Desktop with the 169 IP and it works. I have researched this topic via forums for the past month and a half and now after fresh installing windows would like to try and get some input of what other might think is going on. I am out of options. I had this setup for quite some time with wired and wifi but just all of a sudden about 1-2 months ago after moving my desk and plugging it all in again it stopped working.

    Here is a text format of Ipconfig of my LAC:

    Configuration for interface "Local Area Connection"
    DHCP enabled: Yes
    IP Address: 169.254.xxx.xxx
    Subnet Prefix: 169.254.0.0/xx (mask 255.255.0.0)
    InterfaceMetric: 10
    DNS servers configured through DHCP: None
    Register with which suffix: Primary only
    WINS servers configured through DHCP: None
    As I said I am now running a fresh install of windows with no Bonjour program on it. I have released, renewed and about 15 other CMD commands that I could think of. The internet options for this adapter are set to obtain automatically. I have ran about every malware program I can think of. So any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,449   +324

    Hmm why the splitter BEFORE the router - - that's not the correct way to add a second router

    Code:
    isp==primary router --- existing PC
    to add a second router:
    Code:
    isp==primary router --- existing PC
                     |
                     +--- new router
    
     
  3. jnthnbgg

    jnthnbgg TS Rookie Topic Starter

    The reason is the router is up a floor and to avoid running two 50ft. cables I put the splitter by the cable modem and the Desktop. This also puts the wifi router at the highest point rather than in the basement where it can not get a strong signal out.I have been ruining this set up for over a year now and it just developed when I had to move my desk and unplug everything and plugged it back it and no LAN connection. The original post did not show as I intended it.
    Code:
                                                                /------Wifi Router (main floor)
    ISP------Cable Modem(basement)------Switch/Splitter(basement)
                                                                \-------Desktop (basement)
     
  4. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,449   +324

    Same problem; the ISP modem needs to connect to ONE router.

    If you connect as I suggest:
    [a] you will be successful
    (b) will be following standard network configurations
    [c] have far less problems.

    Now just in case the secondary router is messed up, connect JUST IT to the isp modem and see if devices connected to it can access google, or you still get the 169.x.y.z malconfiguration
     
  5. jnthnbgg

    jnthnbgg TS Rookie Topic Starter

    I am finding it for sure has something to do with the set up but maybe you have a better idea of how to do what I am trying to accomplish. I need to split my signal to my wifi router and get a hard line connection to my desktop as I want to avoid having to port forward everything through the router. That is why I put the ethernet switch before the router and desktop. I am wondering though does a Ethernet switch have the programming/NAT to split the signal properly giving both their own IP as I know the ISP can only assign one. I hope that is clear enough.
     
  6. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,449   +324

    Your comment is understood and - - that's why I am critical of the splitter.

    Port forwarding is a separate issue; let's get the two routers working together first.

    Ditch the splitter.

    Setup the wifi router First like this:
    Wire the Wifi =>PC (ignore the internet for now)
    Get into the settings page and DISABLE the DHCP service.
    Set the SSID you want and the WPA passphrase
    save
    disable remote management & port 8080 use
    save
    set the admin login password
    save & restart

    disconnect the Wifi-Pc

    Now take the primary router, connect a cable to one LAN slot and the other end goes into the WiFI router LAN slot too - - *MUST* leave the WAN slot empty

    This setup allow the primary router to make all DHCP assignment for both routers.

    It also allows sharing regardless of which router the system(s) connect to.

    You have success when you connect via wifi and that system can:
    use the command prompt and find the google address using;
    nslookup google.com

    Get to this point and then we'll discuss port forwarding
     
  7. jnthnbgg

    jnthnbgg TS Rookie Topic Starter

    Well I actually only have one router. I have
    1 Desktop (I want wired Connection)
    1 Laptop (I want wifi connection)
    1 Ethernet Switch (TRENDnet TEG-S50G)
    1 Router (Asus RT-N66U)
    1 Cable Modem -basic Motorola cable modem cable in ethernet cable out
     
  8. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,449   +324

    Ok (sigh) Modem=>Router->Switch---cabled--desktop system

    the Laptop will connect to Router normally.

    Now in reality, the Switch is totally unnecessary for just two devices as the router has 4 x RJ45
     
  9. jnthnbgg

    jnthnbgg TS Rookie Topic Starter

    Ok that is fine I do have a question about routers as I have never used one for a wired connection. If I connect my computer directly to the router the way you are showing and cutting the Switch out, do I still have to port forward programs on my computer or does it just do the same as the switch and split the connection no hassle.
    I understand port forwarding as I have had to when I am using wifi on the laptop. I am just trying to avoid it with my desktop as there are so many programs I have on there that have a huge list of numbers to forward.
    That is why I put the switch before the router because I wanted to avoid any port forwarding and when it was working for the last year it was perfect.
     
  10. jnthnbgg

    jnthnbgg TS Rookie Topic Starter

    Disregard that question as I answered it about right after asking it.
     
  11. deemon

    deemon TS Rookie

    Depends of your router. If you can configure there DMZ (or NAT) and put your desktop computer to DMZ (or NAT your routers internet IP to your desktop), then you should not need any additional port forwarding IMHO. Different home user routers may have the feature named differently (if it exists at all), can be also bridge mode or something else. On some cases then to your home desktop computer is given also your routers internet IP ... OR it's NAT-ed to some inner IP (again depends from your router).

    DMZ and NAT are somewhat different things, but either should be usable for the thing you ask. Also some simpler routers may offer you instead of NAT or DMZ just plain PORT RANGE forwarding, so you just put there one rule to forward all ports (from 1 to 65535) to your desktop computer.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2014
     


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