TechSpot

New rig compatibility check

By Zeutrinox
Dec 22, 2012
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  1. Hello TechSpot community! It's my first post here and I just wanted to ask are the parts of my new computer all compatible?

    Here are the specs:
    • Intel core i7 3770 3.4GHz
    • ASUS P8Z77-V LX [Bought]
    • Hitachi 1TB 32MB SATA3 7200RPM HDS721010CLA332
    • Corsair DDR3 Vengeance Black PC12800 8 GB [2x4GB] CMZ8GX3M2A1600C8
    • ASUS GeForce GTX 660Ti 2GB DirectCU II
    • PSU: Corsair HX Series 650W
    • Case: Cooler Master CM 690 II w/ Transparent Acrylic
    • Cooling: Cooler Master HYPER 212 EVO TURBO Edition
    • ODD: ASUS DVD RW 24x
    • Windows 8 Pro
    I will use it to play games, edit movies, photoshop for most of the time.
    Thanks in advance! :)
     
  2. LNCPapa

    LNCPapa TS Special Forces Posts: 4,371   +289

    If you're asking whether all these parts together will boot up and run Windows/Apps/Games... then yes, it should run just fine (so long as your case has enough clearance for that Evo which I think it does.) You may get several people giving their personal opinions on some of the parts so you might want to give a bit of detail about what you already have or parts that you have no control over. For the most part it should be a really fast machine with the exception of an SSD.
     
    Zeutrinox likes this.
  3. Zeutrinox

    Zeutrinox TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 37

    Well thank you LNCPapa for the response, I very appreciate it.
    Yes, what I mean by my question is will it boot up together and run games/apps normally.
    What do you mean by "you have no control over"?
    And for the SSD, I have my budget cuts so I don't really think I can afford it, hence, could you suggest one or two SSDs that are cheap, high capacity and reliable? Or maybe just suggest another way to make this rig faster.
     
  4. LukeDJ

    LukeDJ TS Addict Posts: 414   +112

    He means "no control over" as in, components that you cannot change (I.e you already own and want to use)

    What is the maximum you are willing to pay for an SSD? It doesn't have be an extremely high capacity, as you can just use it as a boot drive, and for a few programs and/or games.

    Also, I would definitely recommend the i7-3770K over the non K version. You already have a Z77 board, and your buying a CPU cooler, so it makes sense to get an overclock-capable CPU. Even if you don't overclock immediately, it gives you the option in the future.
     
  5. Zeutrinox

    Zeutrinox TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 37

    Oh I see... The only thing I have "no control over" is the mobo itself, nothing else.
    Max would be $120 for a SSD. Can you actually manually choose to store an App/game in SSD or HDD?
    I am not really planning to OC. maybe 0.1 or 0.2 GHz haha.
     
  6. LukeDJ

    LukeDJ TS Addict Posts: 414   +112

    Yes, you can choose what to install on your SSD. Whenever you install a program, it will ask you where you want to install it to, and you can choose the HDD or SSD based on how often you use the program. You can also store all of your movies, music and photos and documents on the HDD (these are the sorts of things that munch up space).

    The Crucial M4 128GB is $110 (If your in the US), and gives you room for the OS and some programs. This will do wonders for the responsiveness of the system.

    Don't be afraid to overclock! :p And even if you don't, the i7-3770K is still only $20 more than the non-K version, and I very strongly recommend you get it (you won't even be able to do your 0.2 GHz otherwise!).

    If heavy multi-tasking isn't your thing, you could even downgrade to an i5-3570K, you won't sacrifice a whole lot of performance, and save yourself a fair bit of cash. (although this is just if you want to save some money for an SSD)
     
  7. Zeutrinox

    Zeutrinox TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 37

    I would probably store most often opened apps in SSD. Maybe I will take the Intel SSD 120GB 330 Series which is $107 in my area.
    I'm not really an overclocker, so yeah, just a bit is fine.
    But I've read some articles about 3770 non-K and they say that it is partially unlocked. The K's multiplier will go up to 63x and the non-K 43x - 44x which I won't be maxing out anyway. :p
    I will be multitasking.

    I think I will stick with the non-K + SSD will do.

    So to summarize it, will all of the parts above (+ an SSD I will be getting) all work together to work, boot, play games, video/image editing?
     
  8. LNCPapa

    LNCPapa TS Special Forces Posts: 4,371   +289

    Yes - all of that is good, but as LukeDJ has been trying to steer you toward the K I will make one last attempt to lead you in that direction. The $20 you will save by not getting the K version is nothing compared to the amount of potential performance you CAN get by spending it. We are talking overclocking so simple that a 20-25% increase in clocks is laughably easy. I'd get the K version - boot the machine up with nothing overclocked and once the machine is up and stable... raise it a bit. It's so easy even a caveman can do it.
     
  9. Zeutrinox

    Zeutrinox TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 37

    Yup, I will be taking it then. Only $20.79 difference hah.
    Thanks for the response! :)
     
  10. LukeDJ

    LukeDJ TS Addict Posts: 414   +112

    No problem mate, good luck with the build! :)
     


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