Question about Wi-Fi & DSL

By learninmypc
Jan 2, 2013
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  1. I read in here someplace where if you had your pc hooked up to DSL & wi fi at the same time, one would cancel out the other? Is that how it is? TIA
  2. St1ckM4n

    St1ckM4n TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 3,385   +607

    Not exactly. But if the wifi and DSL are on different networks (or similar other complicated stuff) then it has an effect.

    Best practise: connect to only one.
  3. learninmypc

    learninmypc TechSpot Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 5,090   +222

    OK, I was just curious. I recently got my W7 on wi fi just to prove my theory so I was curious, thanks. I'll stick with DSL.
  4. St1ckM4n

    St1ckM4n TechSpot Evangelist Posts: 3,385   +607

    Yup, wired connection is the faster, more reliable option.
  5. jobeard

    jobeard TS Ambassador Posts: 13,283   +281

    For background, wire a connection and then get a command prompt (on win7:- search, enter CMD and return)
    In the new window, enter route print and enter.

    The result is the ROUTING TABLE. Under IPv4 Route Table
    are 5 columns; the forth is the Interface (the ip address needed to send traffic out of your system).

    Notice there are only two different addresses; 127.0.0.1 (the local loop back, aka localhost) and some other
    address that is similar to the address shown under the Gateway column. The Gateway address is pointing to your
    router and it is where data must come and go; eg your Interface->the Gateway-->the your ISP.

    Usually, the first line in the routing table is the default route and starts with
    Code:
    0.0.0.0    0.0.0.0  .....
    One way or the other, all network traffic will exit your system using the default route.

    Now for fun, also make a WiFi connection to your router and repeat the route print cmd.
    There are a few more lines added to the route table but notice that although the WiFi address is
    visible (the third unique IP address in the Interface column), there is NO means for it to access the default route.


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