Safe Overclock

By jarulezz
Jan 8, 2009
Topic Status:
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  1. how can i safely, 100% sure it will work and won't break my system make a Overclock of my hardware in my PC,
    Is it hard to overclock anyway??

    this is my System:
    CPU: Intel Dual Core E2200 2.2 GHz
    Mobo: ASUS P5Q SE/R
    Mem: 4 GB DDR 2 (but 32-bit OS reads 3.25 GHz)
    Video: ATI Radeon HD4850 512MB
    HDD: 2 x 80 GB, 1 SATA, 1 IDE
    Sound: Realtek/Samsung
    OS: Windows XP SP3 32-bit
    PSU: EZ Cooling 650W
    And i have 2 fans just cooling and 1 in the PSU and 1 in CPU and 1 in GPU, overall: 5 fans in my machine.

    thanks and do you need any more info??
  2. red1776

    red1776 Omnipotent Ruler of the Universe Posts: 5,887   +85

    HI Jaru,
    boy did you maybe open a can of worms! LOL :D to answer your question you cannot ever be 100% sure that you will not break anything when you overclock.when you apply a higher frequency and voltage to a cpu, gpu, or any solid state device, there is an inherent risk applied. so, you have to decide if you are willing to assume that risk, and decide what it is you want to accomplish. as far as it bieng difficult, its as easy or difficult as you wish to make it. the trick is getting a 'productive' OC that yields performance gains. I have been OC'ing for 12 years starting with my first 486 x 86 machine, so obviously I am of the willing. you can perform a less risky OC by taking it only as high as the stock voltage will go and remain stable and/or limiting it to 15-20%. when you start having to add voltage to get to a higher frequency, it becomes a 'diminishing return' scenario. that is applying a disproportionate percentage of voltage and heat for smaller gains. my suggestion in my humble opinion is to do yourself a favor and do some reading on it and educate yourself before you start cranking things up. I really like this article on OC'ing it is for AMD's but the the principles are the same and its as thorough as I have seen on the net. http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/102 If it turns out to be something you want to do, there are guides that processor specific to your CPU. Just for the record, this is MY OPINION ONLY. you will probably get a wide range of opinions on the subject.
  3. jarulezz

    jarulezz TechSpot Member Topic Starter Posts: 62

    thanks for the reply
    then not thanks cause i just build my PC on last Friday and i'm not willing to break it and buy another one (which i cant because of £0 budget right now :p)
    i didnt even get the time to enjoy it ;)

    what do you mean?
  4. LinkedKube

    LinkedKube TechSpot Project Baby Posts: 4,265   +41

    overclocking is the can of worms, if you havnt done it yet, it can become a long process
  5. jarulezz

    jarulezz TechSpot Member Topic Starter Posts: 62

    ohh ok thanks guys :)
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