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What's this slot for

By circusboy01
Jun 14, 2013
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  1. My computer. Lenovo IdeaCentre K300 has a slot, about 3/4 as long as the memory slots. Does anybody know what it might be for? Because I'd sure like to fill it. I just feel a computer is not complete with empty slots.
    Pre-thanks to all who reply ;0)
     
  2. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 6,000   +1,502

    I'm not following. I've called up a few pics but I don't see anything other than PCIe, PCI, and DDR slots.
     
  3. Blkfx1

    Blkfx1 TS Addict Posts: 889   +171

    He's probably talking about the PCI or PICe slots.
     
  4. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 812   +10

    It could very well be one of those slots. Since the slot is empty, is there any one of these 3 slots that the computer will run without? Cause that's probably the one it is.Naturally I'm just guessing.
     
  5. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 6,000   +1,502

    Can you upload a pic identifying the slot you are questioning?

    PCI and PCIe are card slots for addition computing hardware. They don't require card to be in them.
     
  6. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 812   +10

    Sorry. I don't have a clue how to upload a pic. What ever goes in it has a slot. Just like the memory does, if that helps. You say the PCI and the PCIe slots don't have to have something in them. What about the DDR slot?
    Of course you know my next question after this one is going to be, what kind of hardware can I put in the PCI and PCIe slots? ;0)
     
  7. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 6,000   +1,502

    Maybe this will help
    [​IMG]
     
  8. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 812   +10

    I didn't pay too much attention when I had my tower open except at the Ram and Ram slots. But I believe I only had one slot open.
    If the pic. is to scale the long yellow one looks about as long as my Ram slots. I mentioned that the empty one was about 3/4 as long as the Ram slots, but it could have been as long as the 2 other slots shown.
    So I'm guessing it's a PCI slot. I'll open the case, and check to see how long it is. If you want to wait until... I absolutely have to ;0)
    What kind of things could one put into a PCI slot? Thanks
     
  9. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 6,000   +1,502

    The most common is networking (wired or wireless), sound, and IO cards (such as USB, Firewire, and eSATA).
     
  10. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 812   +10

    Since I know that my sound works ( I can hear my music) My USBs work ( I have things plugged into them,and my flash drives work)
    Does that mean that it is not a PCI slot, or that I have another one that is not empty? I've heard the word Firewire, but don't remember what it is. Don't know what IO cards or eSATA is.
    If you want me to stop bugging you with questions. I'll understand.
     
  11. Blkfx1

    Blkfx1 TS Addict Posts: 889   +171

    That slot is for a "Add-in card". It's to provide your computer with extra capabilities should you choose to utilize it. For instance, you could add a usb card if you needed more usb ports. Or, you could add a wireless card if you needed wireless capabilities. It's to add additional features - it has nothing to do with present hardware. I hope that helps you understand it a bit better. Judging from that post you seem a little confused :p

    If not, I'm sure cliffordcooley will be able to articulate an answer that helps.
     
    cliffordcooley likes this.
     
  12. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 6,000   +1,502

    Blkfx1 is correct!

    The easiest way I know to explain things, is your motherboard comes with most of those features built in. However as technology advances and features become damaged, there are card slot options available for upgrade/repair.

    PCI is older than PCIe, but still in use even though it is considerably slower than PCIe. I wasn't trying to confuse you with examples, sorry about that.

    Practically everything built into the motherboard, also comes in the form of an add-in card. If you wish for additional features your motherboard does not provide, I'm confident you can find an add-in card to supply these features.
     
    Blkfx1 likes this.
  13. fimbles

    fimbles TS Evangelist Posts: 1,264   +148

  14. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 812   +10

    You're right,I am a little confused, and a lot curious. Quick question. If I installed a wireless card would I get a stronger WIFI signal than what I'm getting with the stick I'm using now? Thanks.
     
  15. learninmypc

    learninmypc TS Evangelist Posts: 5,243   +232

    I think that depends on where the router is & how many walls/floors it has to go thru.
    There is one floor & probably 5 or 6 walls my wifi has to go thru which is why I'm sticking with DSL.
    So I don't think it'll matter.
     
  16. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 6,000   +1,502

    Wireless cards have a better chance at having better signal because of antenna quality. However not all cards are made with superior quality to USB network sticks. Without looking at the details between card and stick, a comparison would be hard to say.

    This is a bit confusing.

    A LAN (Local Area Network) connection (such as Wifi or Ethernet) connects through a router to a WAN (Wide Area Network) connection (such as DSL or cable). I'm not quite following why WiFi would dictate the type of WAN used. Cable or phone line access is usually what dictates which type of WAN is used.
     
  17. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 812   +10



    I'm not sure what we have. I think it's DSL. I know it's not cable. I know we have a Verizon Router hooked up to the phone line. The router is all the way in the front of the mobile home. My computer is down the hall. all the way in the back of the mobile home. There is only one door between. I'm am connected wireless using a Netgear WNA 1100 Smart Wizard (stick)
     
  18. learninmypc

    learninmypc TS Evangelist Posts: 5,243   +232

    A DSL plug looks very similiar to a phone plug
     
  19. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 6,000   +1,502

    A DSL plug is a phone plug. DSL filters are used to filter DSL signals out of the phone line. It's my understanding the phone system had to be rebuilt, to allow for the higher frequencies of DSL before it was available to the masses.

    For a long time phone companies wouldn't allow DSL without having a phone number. I've heard but don't know for certain, a phone number may not currently be required for DSL. Then again it may be dependent on the location in which you live. Allowing DSL would required bypassing phone number disconnects.
     
  20. learninmypc

    learninmypc TS Evangelist Posts: 5,243   +232

    A DSL plug can't be a phone plug because one cannot put a phone plug in the DSL receiver on the back of the pc. They look very similiar which is why it can be confusing,but you can't do as I've said. I've tried.
    Now the wires may be the same, just a different plug. If I'm incorrect, sorry.
     
  21. cliffordcooley

    cliffordcooley TechSpot Paladin Posts: 6,000   +1,502

    The network port on the back of your PC is not the DSL receiver. Thats the function of the DSL modem. Once the signal is translated by the modem it becomes a local networking signal.

    A DSL modem is a bridge between your LAN and the WAN. DSL modems are used to connect ISP's through a phone system. There will be at least one Ethernet port for local networking and one phone line port for connecting ISP. Routers, Switches, and Wireless Access Points are all independent features of a Local Area Network, which are independent from DSL.
     
  22. learninmypc

    learninmypc TS Evangelist Posts: 5,243   +232

    Ok, I confess I don't know the technicalities of it, I just know on the back of my XP, there were two "almost" identical sockets. One phone (dial up) the other one for DSL. Obviously one can plug a phone line into the DSL & reverse, one can't plug a DSL in a phone socket.
     
  23. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 812   +10

    I think DSL is what we have. I know Verizon told us we needed a phone line to hook up the router. We don't really need a land line. All 3 of us use our cell phones. but we got a phone. I'm on SSI , and social security so I put the phone in my name as I am low income, so it only costs about $7.00 a month. Verizon came in and installed something, or maybe they just plugged something into the phone jack. I never really looked at it. But we can use the phone and the Internet at the same time.
     
  24. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 812   +10

    I think you're right. I think they are bigger. But we don't have to worry about plugging something into the back of our PCs. We are all wireless.
     
  25. learninmypc

    learninmypc TS Evangelist Posts: 5,243   +232

    Wireless is ok, but I've found out DSL is better because it don't matter how many floors/walls there are, you'll still get it. I used to think wireless was really neat because it meant my tower could be portable (mobile) like a laptop. Anyhow, I have both wifi & DSL here & am on DSL.
     


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