Western Digital plans release of 150GB 10,000RPM drive

By Justin Mann on December 23, 2005, 11:13 AM
One of the most popular drives for enthusiasts has been Western Digital's Raptor, a way for home and small office users to have a 10,000RPM drive somewhat cheaper than a comparable SCSI drive. The only downside to the faster disks, besides a higher rate of failure, was capacity. The faster spindle speed, often coupled with striping, brings much-needed speed to a modern computers biggest bottleneck. The largest currently available in the line is 72GB, while it still carries a price tag that is more than a standard 200GB disk. Western Digital is planning the release of the WD1500AD, a 16MB cache 10,000RPM NCQ-supporting beast, with a large capacity of 150GB. It supports SATA-II, and will retail for $380. Pretty steep for a disk, but it promises incredible speed and likely will help bring prices of other 10k disks down. Seagate will probably soon follow suit with their Cheetah line.




User Comments: 38

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asphix said:
wow, thats an expensive hard drive. I'd rather get 2x 7,200 120GB drives and run them in a raid 0 saving the cash.I've had my two WD7200 SATA drives running in raid 0 for close to 3 years now without a single problem. Great performance and sure beats spending close to 400 bucks.Maybe I've been lucky as far as not experiencing any hard disk failures though.
barfarf said:
Yeah raid zero always scared me. I wanted the extra performance but it takes only one drive to die to loose your data. I know you should "back up" but i can only back up so space and so often. Even with a single hardrive dieing you have much better chance saving your data off since its not split up between the two drives.Your right asphix the new raptor is a$$ expensive.[Edited by barfarf on 2005-12-23 11:59:57]
PanicX said:
The same was true when the 74Gb model was introduced. You could always just RAID 0 a couple of 36Gb. However the reviews all showed that a RAID 0 74Gb was noticably faster than a RAID 0 36Gb. So hopefully the same scenario will show with the 150Gb models. Personally I already have RAID 0 74Gb and don't think I'd upgrade for anything but an [url=http://www.gigabyte.com.tw/Peripherals/Products/Product
_GC-RAMDISK%20(Rev%201.1).htm]Gigabyte iRAM[/url], but I won't complain if these drives rock.
Soul Harvester said:
The excessive drive failures were in the 10,000RPM line. We had nearly 15% of our 10k drives fail last year. They are doing much better this year though (2005). And yes, they are quite expensive. 10,000RPM though is very nice to have. The speed is incredible.
---agissi--- said:
Wow thats awesome! I've always been a fan of the Raptor line but its been real limited with its (mere) 2 drive capacities, so to finally see a bigger version is sweet. Its expensive yes, but remember how expensive the 30GB and 80GB versions were once upon a time? They were outragious, kinda like this one will be for awhile, but after a while (too long I know) price will drop and hopefully I can pick one up. I'd rather have 1 big drive than 2 small ones (150GB VS 2x80GB's).
nimo333 said:
You don't need this kind of HD except maybe one to burn DVDs.
kangaruffian said:
yup average joe doesnt need that speed..
PanicX said:
[b]Originally posted by nimo333:[/b][quote]You don't need this kind of HD except maybe one to burn DVDs.[/quote]Thats a fairly bold statement. So perhaps I can pose a question to you. Lets say you NEED to build a dual processor server with a terabyte of storage to host a database that has a disk I/O of about 400 Mb/sec. All this for under say, $6000. How would you do it?You'll need to use RAID to get the thruput demands with drives big enough to meet the capasity requirements.A SCSI based server could meet the thruput and disk space demands but you'd be hard pressed to fit it in a $6000 budget. Drives that aren't at least 10,000 RPM's will have a hard time achieving 400 Mb/sec thruput. You'd have to use SATA 10,000 RPM drives, but to achive 500 Gb storage you'd need about 16 72Gb drives. RAID controllers that support more than 12 drives are very expensive. So the 150Gb drives would be needed to achieve these goals.[Edited by PanicX on 2005-12-23 13:30:02]
CrossFire851 said:
Well my idea is that the average person, key word now " AVERAGE PERSON" only needs 20gb of space for internet browsing, busines, typocail game, etc etc now what we should be doing is incorpating more of the 20k, 25k rpm drives. They would are small but, perfect for all-around basic storage.
mtyson8 said:
How is the speed really that much incredible compared to a 7200rpm drive? I know its more, but how much are we talking here? Opening up a file 0.2 seconds faster than a 7200rpm drive? REally, computers are fast enough as it is. What makes a PC slow is viruses.
mtyson8 said:
Also, crossfire, 20 gigs isnt really alot anymore. Now i know no one needs 200GBs, but 20GB is good nowadays only to store 2 NEW games, and some songs. Games nowadays are 4GB in size. The AVERAGE PERSON, belive it or not, could use a 40 or 50GB, leaving extra space for speed. And new programs are getting bigger and bigger in MB, even GB size. Also, i agree that average would use about 20GB, but this would mean their HD would be full, making it very slow. They need about 15GB of leyway.
nathanskywalker said:
wow, i think seagate should try something like this. Though that is alot to pay, and the risks, well i guess you would just have to weigh them out. I wonder how many people are really willing to pay for a little extra speed though...
Eleventeen said:
[b]Originally posted by nathanskywalker:[/b][quote]wow, i think seagate should try something like this. Though that is alot to pay, and the risks, well i guess you would just have to weigh them out. I wonder how many people are really willing to pay for a little extra speed though...[/quote]I really dont think that many. Although you will find a couple people who will. Heck, some will probably even RAID them. That would be so fast it would make me sick. Hooray.
nathanskywalker said:
[b]Originally posted by Eleventeen:[/b][quote][b]Originally posted by nathanskywalker:[/b][quote]wow, i think seagate should try something like this. Though that is alot to pay, and the risks, well i guess you would just have to weigh them out. I wonder how many people are really willing to pay for a little extra speed though...[/quote]I really dont think that many. Although you will find a couple people who will. Heck, some will probably even RAID them. That would be so fast it would make me sick. Hooray.[/quote]ahhh, yes [url]http://www.acnc.com/04_01_00.html,[/url] RAID. Huh, yeah i don't think many people can pay that $380 for a 150gig drive when you can get a 300 gig, for like $160 or less...
Soul Harvester said:
[b]Originally posted by CrossFire851:[/b][quote]Well my idea is that the average person, key word now " AVERAGE PERSON" only needs 20gb of space for internet browsing, busines, typocail game, etc etc now what we should be doing is incorpating more of the 20k, 25k rpm drives. They would are small but, perfect for all-around basic storage.[/quote]Well, this isn't a site for the "average person", now is it? Most people here are enthusaists, gamers, video editors, performance users, etc.We want speed.
Handyman said:
Well it's good news because this means that in a couple of years 10'000 RPM drives will be a common sight. Remember how fast prices dropped back in 2002 when the 5400 RPM drives were being phased out? As for the price 380$ is a terrible way to overcharge! I'd rather buy 2 200 GB drives and use them in a striping RAID configuration. Taking this thougt further 2*74 Gb 10'000 RPM would be GODLIKE.If your pacience has a really short fuse then it's definetly the way to go.
---agissi--- said:
Come on guys, you keep talking about the "average person". This is a computer enthusiast website, none of us are the average person needing 20GBs of space and only surfing the internet, so cant we leave out the averages? Ofviously Dell isnt going to go putting these drives in all the mainstream sale computers, it would be people like me and you buying them for the most part - Just like all the other Raptor drives.
dbuske said:
What they don't tell you is that the bigger the hard drive the slower the access. Unless you want alot of partitions that causes alot of problems also.
otmakus said:
Average computer enthusiasts can't afford drives that expensive. I agree that none of us here are the average person needing only 20 GB of space and only surfing the internet, but most people prefer to have at least several hundred GB of space, lightning fast processor, high end video card, M/B, case, PSU, 2 GB memory, and so on before even considering buying a $380, 150GB drive, no matter how much faster.Only RICH computer enthusiasts can afford these drives, and the others can only drool. I bet most of us here are drooling, instead of going to the shop to buy one.
---agissi--- said:
Yeah you defently hit that one on the head otmakus!
PUTALE said:
wow, i hope it does. I always love teh WD's raptor but the space is just unaccetable. If they can make 150gig whiel up the speed, then it would be so nice(hopefully it will drive the industry and make it a standard). Although, I hope the price will be cheaper.
mentaljedi said:
I have a 40GB HD and its a pain. I keep having to delete old stuff to get new stuff. Right now, perfect is 80-100 GB. By the year, 2010 i'd say we'd need 150-200GB HD. I have 0 budget, not really but practiacally, and so that should mean i'm pretty average. But come on, pictures can be a couple of MB! I can hardly use floppies any more! My "My pictures" hold around... 100MB ofpictures. PICTURES! This is not counting the videos. Trust, most need more. Mind you, all these picture are of Star Wars and other fanbased things so you can imagine what kind of HD eating stuff i've got.
nimo333 said:
I don't even see what's the big deal of SATA 10k RPM when there are 15k RPM SCSI drives for years now also you can crank up more drives per controller so I think SATA 10k is over-rated & I wouldn't look into one any time soon
MonkeyMan said:
Wow that's huge man, I don't think I would be able to use up 150GB lol. All that extra space will be just left there for nothing lol. Anyways, I think its great, and I may purchase one.
otmakus said:
If u think u wouldn't be able to use up 150 GB of space, then I advise u to buy a smaller, fast drive for ur system drive and buy 2 bigger, slower drives and set them in RAID 1. The faster the drive spins, the higher its probability to fail. This kind of fast drive for personal user is mostly used as system and software drive, where the difference of speed is actually felt, and because if the drive does fail, there isn't any critical data lost.I'd prefer to save my MP3 and pictures collection in a safer, cheaper, and bigger drives, although somewhat slower. I wouldn't mind if the songs start to play 0,1 seconds slower than they would be if they are stored in a fast drive, but I know I would curse myself if one day the drive suddenly dies and bring along my entire collection with it.Of course it's a different story if u have money to burn, u can always buy 2 of this drive and set them in RAID 1. Then u'll have the speed, the space, and the safety of ur data.
CrossFire851 said:
[b]Originally posted by Soul Harvester:[/b][quote][b]Originally posted by CrossFire851:[/b][quote]Well my idea is that the average person, key word now " AVERAGE PERSON" only needs 20gb of space for internet browsing, busines, typocail game, etc etc now what we should be doing is incorpating more of the 20k, 25k rpm drives. They would are small but, perfect for all-around basic storage.[/quote][quote]Well, this isn't a site for the "average person", now is it? Most people here are enthusaists, gamers, video editors, performance users, etc.[quote]We want speed.[/quote]
CrossFire851 said:
[b]Originally posted by dbuske:[/b][quote]What they don't tell you is that the bigger the hard drive the slower the access. Unless you want alot of partitions that causes alot of problems also.[/quote]No since the disk is smaller then a 73gb it can accecsse info faster from my undersatanding............
Per Hansson said:
Well, otmakus your logic is quite flawed, because the raptor has a MTBF of 1,2 million hours, twice that of many standard 7200RPM desktop harddrives...And SCSI 15000RPM drives have even higher MTBF, oftenly over 1,4 million MTBF hours...
CrossFire851 said:
[b]Originally posted by dbuske:[/b][quote]What they don't tell you is that the bigger the hard drive the slower the access. Unless you want alot of partitions that causes alot of problems also.[/quote]Not really if your comparing a 74gb 10k sata drive, the 150gb is going to be faster. the disk is more compact wich would allow data streams to open faster.But come really ppl you only need one of these if your video-grachic disginer and/or gammer.I have a 35gb 10k and man i would be skrued if i dint have my 7.2k 200gb. I only use my 35gb primmary, for games but only benfit there is that you can join a sever a 10 sec sonner than everyone else and if you have a nosie issuses. vista doesnt really have a magger inprovness w/ it. So relly graphic design- video is the only reason of getting one
PUTALE said:
nimo333 the sata is much more affordable than SCSI. it's more common in consumer market, hence the upgrade in the speed is a welcoming given that we have stuck in the 7200 for quite awhile now.
Phantasm66 said:
[b]Originally posted by barfarf:[/b][quote]Yeah raid zero always scared me. [/quote]There's nothing to fear. You've heard of backups, surely?
Bartzy said:
Isn't it 74GB and not 72GB for the current Raptor version ? Anyway, Raid 0 is a better option. You can get 2x120 or even 2x160GB in the Raptor's price, and the performance differences will not be visible. That's what I'm going to do :)
Nic said:
[b]Originally posted by Per Hansson:[/b][quote]Well, otmakus your logic is quite flawed, because the raptor has a MTBF of 1,2 million hours, twice that of many standard 7200RPM desktop harddrives...And SCSI 15000RPM drives have even higher MTBF, oftenly over 1,4 million MTBF hours...[/quote]Something to note is that MTBF does not indicate reliability. 1.2 million hours MTBF translates to around 137 years, and NO hard drive will last that long. You should ignore MTBF figures when judging reliability...From the original post...[quote]"...The only downside to the faster disks, besides a [b]higher rate of failure[/b], was capacity..."[/quote]
otmakus said:
For the same amount of money, most PC enthusiasts will prefer huge space over faster drives. Of course if one could afford it, it's always better to have huge space AND faster drives, but I don't think most PC enthusiasts are that rich (I know I'm not)For the reliability factor, someone who can afford buying these drives surely can afford to buy DVD burner and lots of blank DVDs to backup everything, or even buy a 400GB drive and ghost everything into it.
PUTALE said:
hehehe, that's if you remember to backup your files. I am so lazy backing them up.I hope the decision my WD will drive the industry to 10K RPM and bring the price down to more affordable level.
brownpaper said:
Why buy this drive when you can buy an Xbox 360? I'd buy one of these drives if I was doing video editing as it would be great to have a really fast scratch disk. I thought bigger drives have faster seek times since the drive could access more GB, moving the read head the same distance?
luismigilbert said:
i need one of those...everytime i play far cry, it takes a lot of time loading maps...even swapping will be faster...but i'll wait for a lower price...
AeonXX said:
I think otmakus has the right idea here; these drives are for the rich nuts, not the average hobbyist. For those that donít need to be resourceful, itís just easier to lay down money than to devise such solutions. If I were rich, I would probably just buy the best of the best, and not tinker with it too much. Unfortunately, Iím always budgeting myself, so Iíd never even think of buying something like this. For those who can afford it, go for it!
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