Ripping CDs is still theft, says RIAA

By Justin Mann on December 11, 2007, 11:48 AM
It is no big secret that the RIAA hates people who use music in any fashion they don't approve of. They opposed personal media players, they opposed digital downloads and in the past they have opposed ripping your own CDs. As a matter of fact, they still oppose it. As a recent court case is demonstrating, the RIAA is willing to attack people who rip their own music, claiming that making mp3s from your own CDs is “unauthorized”.

Whether or not someone chooses to share that music, it shouldn't be up to the RIAA, or anyone for that matter, to tell you what you can and cannot do with a CD. It goes to show how archaic that organization has become, and how out of touch with reality they are. Apple has rebuilt their empire largely in part to people dumping CDs, Microsoft builds tools to do such right into their OS and there is a never-ending list of programs and suites intended to make such operations easy.

While they may have other grounds with which to attack these particular people on, relying on “ripping music is stealing” is a shot in the dark.




User Comments: 10

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canadian said:
Seriously, something has to be done to stop the RIAA. What could be done, short of revolution?
windmill007 said:
Don't worry they will go down with there sinking ship. They can sue all they want..In the end they will fail and have to convert to the new way of doing business. I haven't bought a cd in years. Everything I do is with 320K VBR. That is the best sounding smallest size! Wake up ITUNES...Amazon is closest but need to up from 256 VBR. I'm glad there is mp3sparks. It allows you to make any format you want at a reasonable cost. I actually stopped useing P2P and paying at this site. To bad its not one of RIAA models. WAKE UP RIAA! Or risk losing us all to places that give us what we want!
greenman said:
I'm not sure RIAA really supports what the artists want anymore. I'm curious how much of the royalty money collected really gets into the hands of the artists. Is this a case of greed on the part of administrators of RIAA, or are the artists themselves complaining? I do know this much: One of my forbears helped start the RIAA. The royalty system was set up in the early 1900's to give starving musicians and music writers a way to keep a roof above their heads and so that large recording companies couldn't just steal their work out from under them and use it to their own purposes. It's been twisted considerably since then. Many artists don't get much if anything from their royalties because of 'production' costs they are supposed to pay. The record companies screw them out of a right and honorable wage for their living with paperwork - virtual contract slavery. So is the RIAA helping artists or record companies? I think it's the record companies and not the artists. So RIAA is serving exactly the opposite purpose that it originally served - using the artists' money against them. This is wrong-headed. If it's not performing the original function correctly today, we need a new system that *does* support artists for *their* work. It should be started by artists, for artists and represent artists alone and not mega-recording companies. What can we do to really support artists where the RIAA is failing? Create artist-owned recording studios that charge a set and fixed reasonable cost for recording new artists. Create an open-source legal documentation website that all artists can use as boiler-plate for reasonable and just contracts with would-be distrubutors, agents and gigs. Set up a new royalty distribution situation putting residuals in the hands of the artists and not the companies that supposedly 'represent' them. There have to be a million ways it could be done better than the RIAA.
phantasm66 said:
[b]Originally posted by windmill007:[/b][quote]Don't worry they will go down with there sinking ship. They can sue all they want..In the end they will fail and have to convert to the new way of doing business. I haven't bought a cd in years. Everything I do is with 320K VBR. That is the best sounding smallest size! Wake up ITUNES...Amazon is closest but need to up from 256 VBR. I'm glad there is mp3sparks. It allows you to make any format you want at a reasonable cost. I actually stopped useing P2P and paying at this site. To bad its not one of RIAA models. WAKE UP RIAA! Or risk losing us all to places that give us what we want![/quote]That's a good post. The truth is, the RIAA are indeed fighting a loosing battle. Their old model is gone. Their huge profits will soon be a thing of the past. Artists will turn from them when the new way of doing things is properly established. It will take a few years still, but its well on its way.
papercut_2008 said:
So, I'm writing a term paper on piracy right now, and as I'm doing research, I keep thinking "wow, these guys (the RIAA) are scumbags. Suing dead people, and people who don't have a computer? Wow. So I decide that I want to ask the RIAA what gives, and I surf over to their site to find contact info. None there. *GASP*... I'm choking on irony right now... these guys are mercilessly tracking people down, and finding new reasons to sue, but won't even give us a contact e-mail or phone number? That says it all.
captaincranky said:
It's heartwarming to know that even if you have no skills that could possibly benefit mankind, you can still get a job as a lawyer for the RIAA.
dlptir78345 said:
RIAA is as one of the posters stated "scumbags". They are the proverable kettle calling the pot black! Not only does the RIAA NOT provide a decent return to the Artist, they overcharge for their services. It is impossible for the cost of "production" to be much today. Many people have recording studios in their homes that are twice as good as the RIAA studios of the past. With the easy availability of good quality microphones, recorders, and the knowledge present on the web, there is no need for an RIAA going forward. Hopefully when their funds decrease sufficiently they will not be able to afford to pay their lawyers. The other hope is that the judges start throwing their cases out of court. Remember we can legislate the RIAA out of business by having Congress create the appropriate law rather than waiting for the courts or time to solve the current stupidity being displayed by the RIAA.
Mictlantecuhtli said:
Doesn't United States have any kind of "fair use" laws?
bushwhacker said:
And I'm not even surprised that RIAA won't even lets us just burn the CDs as back up for our own uses.
captaincranky said:
[b]Originally posted by Mictlantecuhtli:[/b][quote]Doesn't United States have any kind of "fair use" laws?[/quote]From what I think I understand we do, but it's a catch 22. Allegedly we can make back-up copies of a disc that we own. However, it's illegal for us to contravene copy protection. This leaves you breaking the law while making the copy you're entitled to make.The RIAA simply decides summarily to re-legislate or re-adjudicate the issue anytime they feel so disposed. Basically, they decide what they think the law should be, and move forward claiming that that's the way it is. Even if they lose, they could just move on to another Federal Appeals Court Circuit and start the SOS all over again. [Edited by captaincranky on 2007-12-17 23:44:12]
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