Apple wants to squelch rogue iPhone app store

By Justin Mann on March 10, 2009, 1:10 PM
Last week, we began to hear about some of the first rogue iPhone App stores that began to appear. Attempting to cut out Apple, these unauthorized stores were largely developer-backed, for reasons ranging from increasing profit to getting around Apple's strict App Store entrance rules. To nobody's surprise, Apple is not happy with these developments, and wants to see such renegade stores get shut down.

The company has gone on the offensive, using the DMCA as their weapon of choice. Apple claims that The Cydia Store, along with jailbreaking, represent illegal use of the iPhone. No matter how much you paid for your phone, they assert that they still own the software it runs. Ultimately, Apple's destination will be the courts where they will try to make jailbreaks officially illegal and get outfits like Cydia shut down.

The iPhone App store is one of Apple's fastest-growing cash cows, and they will take any threat to it, no matter how small, seriously. I wonder what their reaction would be towards an application store that didn't charge for apps, only provided apps that Apple had previously rejected.




User Comments: 8

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captain828 said:
Hhmm... I'm starting to wonder whether Apple knows it's on Earth or not??
kingdingdong said:
I agree, get over your self apple.
TorturedChaos said:
So you buy the phone and apple still owns it.... or at least that is what their argument sounds like.btw I think you also sell them your soul somewhere in the contract.
nazartp said:
And people complain about IE being pre-installed in Windows...
Eddie_42 said:
there are these nifty things called End Use License Agreements (EULA), maybe you heard of them? Apple does own the software, that's why when people make a program to utilize that software it has to be distributed through apple. It equivalent to using an artists song as background music in your new game, you still have to pay the record label for every copy sold, Even if you wrote the code for the game. (emphasis on 'sold')Im sorry all you pirates are to damn cheap to cough up $2 for an application.
nazartp said:
[b]Originally posted by Eddie_42:[/b][quote]there are these nifty things called End Use License Agreements (EULA), maybe you heard of them? Apple does own the software, that's why when people make a program to utilize that software it has to be distributed through apple. It equivalent to using an artists song as background music in your new game, you still have to pay the record label for every copy sold, Even if you wrote the code for the game. (emphasis on 'sold')Im sorry all you pirates are to damn cheap to cough up $2 for an application.[/quote]Way to paint people with the broad brush... I suggest you get off your high horse. For the lack of better example, does MS get a royalty every time a software being installed on a Windows-based computer? Not allowing an application to run on your OS, even though you legitimately bough/developed an application is beyond ridiculous. That's what it is about, not about saving a couple of bucks. It's about Apple squeezing every penny from the developers that want to run an application on Apple's device/OS.
viperpfl said:
[b]Originally posted by Eddie_42:[/b][quote]there are these nifty things called End Use License Agreements (EULA), maybe you heard of them? Apple does own the software, that's why when people make a program to utilize that software it has to be distributed through apple. It equivalent to using an artists song as background music in your new game, you still have to pay the record label for every copy sold, Even if you wrote the code for the game. (emphasis on 'sold')Im sorry all you pirates are to damn cheap to cough up $2 for an application.[/quote]1) What if GM told you that you can only use GM approved parts for your car? You may have bought the car but GM actually owns the car. 2) What if Microsoft only allowed you to buy programs for your computer from there site? You may have bought the computer but Microsoft owns the operating system.3) What if you bought a Panasonic DVD player and you could only buy movies from Panasonic because they own the firmware on the DVD player?This isn't about piracy, not by a long shot. This has to do with who has control. Why do you think Apple allows you to put your own music on your Ipod and not just music from Itunes? The reason why is because people wouldn't buy the Ipod if they couldn't. So what is the difference between the Ipod and Iphone. Apple owns the interface on both but allows one but not the other. Your right, if I don't like the Iphone then I don't have to buy it. I just laugh at all the suckers who do buy it and Apple is laughing as well.
Xempler said:
On the one hand I can see how Apple has the rights to own the software on their iphones / ipods and can control what you put in it as well as keep out competitors. On the other hand, that is why I don't or will never own a Apple product.
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