Chile passes law to enforce net neutrality, more

By on July 15, 2010, 8:27 PM
In a nearly unanimous decision of 100 votes to one abstention, the Chilean Congress today passed a set of amendments to the General Telecommunications Law making it the first country to mandate network neutrality. Bulletin 4915 states that ISPs must not interfere, discriminate, or in any way hinder access to content, applications or services, except for security measures such as virus protection.

Under the new law, ISPs will also be forced to ensure the integrity of their systems and provide users with parental controls along with guaranteeing their privacy. Additionally, Internet providers will have to be more transparent about contracts, the average and maximum speeds users can expect, and the difference between international and national connections as well as the quality of those services.

This is a huge step in the right direction, and one that the US and other developed nations remain unsuccessful in taking. Chile's move comes only weeks after Finland granted its citizens with the legal right to in-home broadband Internet. Here's to hoping these advancements inspire change elsewhere on our little blue marble.




User Comments: 18

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matrix86 matrix86 said:

I wish the US would do this...unfortunately, we're too busy trying to track down people illegally downloading music/movies/programs. Net neutrality would make it harder for ISPs to block those types of sites. Our government seems to be wanting to be more involved with our lives, which goes against net neutrality.

But who knows, maybe one day congress will get some sense knocked into them and the US will have this.

Guest said:

@matrix86 Time to vote out any politicians that has their head up the corporation's @ss and receiving money from them.

EXCellR8 EXCellR8, The Conservative, said:

won't happen in the US.

and it's chile, they have like 40 computers...

Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

EXCellR8 said:

won't happen in the US.

and it's chile, they have like 40 computers...

Even soo, thats 40 computers in the right direction

Guest said:

How can it be the "right" direction ?

The web has already become a convoluted mess.

If world leaders had some back bone we would not have to deal with porn, illegal media sharing, general piracy and what have you.

Neutrality is just some twisted form of appeasement and appeasement does not work.

Staff
Julio Franco Julio Franco, TechSpot Editor, said:

You'd be surprised Excell, these are 2008 figures, I'm sure today that's at least double if not triple the amount:

[link]

You must also consider penetration per capita, they are at over 50% already which is an amazing mark in South America.

matrix86 matrix86 said:

Guest said:

How can it be the "right" direction ?

The web has already become a convoluted mess.

If world leaders had some back bone we would not have to deal with porn, illegal media sharing, general piracy and what have you.

There's a thing called "filters". Don't like what you see? Block it. The government needs to stay out of our lives and let us look at whatever we want. They have no right to tell the American people what they can and cannot view. There are no laws against pornography. Certain acts are illegal (underage and animal sex), but you can't make sex itself illegal. Porn may be immoral, but so are violent video games and most of today's movies and TV shows.

File sharing...no matter what the government does, there will always be file sharing. Why are you so upset about it? How has file sharing hurt you?

Bottom line, the government has no right to tell us what we can and cannot look at online. They start doing that and next thing you know, we're the next China. Content filtering should be done by parents, not the government and not some guy sitting behind a desk. And all this is coming from a Christian parent. I don't want my child involved in illegal file sharing or porn, so i'll just block that content when she gets to the age where she starts using a computer.

aj_the_kidd said:

matrix86 said:

Guest said:

How can it be the "right" direction ?

The web has already become a convoluted mess.

If world leaders had some back bone we would not have to deal with porn, illegal media sharing, general piracy and what have you.

There's a thing called "filters". Don't like what you see? Block it. The government needs to stay out of our lives and let us look at whatever we want. They have no right to tell the American people what they can and cannot view. There are no laws against pornography. Certain acts are illegal (underage and animal sex), but you can't make sex itself illegal. Porn may be immoral, but so are violent video games and most of today's movies and TV shows.

File sharing...no matter what the government does, there will always be file sharing. Why are you so upset about it? How has file sharing hurt you?

Bottom line, the government has no right to tell us what we can and cannot look at online. They start doing that and next thing you know, we're the next China. Content filtering should be done by parents, not the government and not some guy sitting behind a desk. And all this is coming from a Christian parent. I don't want my child involved in illegal file sharing or porn, so i'll just block that content when she gets to the age where she starts using a computer.

Wow common sense, thats kinda rare these days. Its good to see some parents still try to make an effort rather than excuses.

If you removed porn and stopped file sharing i'd have nothing to do

TorturedChaos, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

@matrix86 - wonderfully stated

----

And Hopefully this will put forth a precedent for other countries, and maybe if enough start adopting similar policies the US might consider it.

Kibaruk Kibaruk, TechSpot Paladin, said:

EXCellR8 said:

won't happen in the US.

and it's chile, they have like 40 computers...

What the hell do you know little kid? Have you been to Chile? Have you actually seen how many computers do we have? I at home have 3 laptops and 2 computers, and I bet you there is at least 1 per home.

Why do you think this law was passed? In Chile our government has the idea of making of Chile a developed nation over 2020, which is not bad at all, this is the first of many which will make us go that way.

Guest said:

Monsieur, you have been successfully trolled. :P

However, in case EXCellR8 is half-serious, I agree that he should read up a little on present-day Chile.

tengeta tengeta said:

Net Neutrality is dead, its original purpose got eaten alive by politics and now its more about using the name to get support and in the end actually make the internet more restricted and regulated than ever.

Its always fun how using a popular name gets the troops behind a useless movement.

Kibaruk Kibaruk, TechSpot Paladin, said:

tengeta said:

Net Neutrality is dead, its original purpose got eaten alive by politics and now its more about using the name to get support and in the end actually make the internet more restricted and regulated than ever.

Its always fun how using a popular name gets the troops behind a useless movement.

Really? Then why it has just been aproved a law for it in Chile? Sounds... odd.

Oh and to add something to Julio's numbers, 2 years ago when there were almost 6mill online computers, its a huge number for a 16 mill population. Imagine by now it must have more than doubled.

julianignacio said:

Chile has an internet usage of 50.4% over the whole population of 16,601,707. That makes 8,369,036 users and the highest internet penetration percentage in South America, with the exception of the Falkland Islands, that has a population of 2,483 and a 100% usage according to www.internetworldstats.com.

Legislation like the one passed in this country should be the standard for all the world. Information should not be restricted or controlled, that's what internet and the world wide web is all about. What you decide to see is your responsibility.

tengeta tengeta said:

Kibaruk said:

tengeta said:

Net Neutrality is dead, its original purpose got eaten alive by politics and now its more about using the name to get support and in the end actually make the internet more restricted and regulated than ever.

Its always fun how using a popular name gets the troops behind a useless movement.

Really? Then why it has just been aproved a law for it in Chile? Sounds... odd.

Oh and to add something to Julio's numbers, 2 years ago when there were almost 6mill online computers, its a huge number for a 16 mill population. Imagine by now it must have more than doubled.

Because in Chile lobbyists didn't get it corrupted to a point where the only neutrality is in the name.

Guest said:

tengeta is correct in his points, the lobbyists have the politicians by the throat in America. Politicians have to listen and do what they say or face a scandal that will destroy their careers. That is why net neutrality in America is a dead horse, a futile movement that has no traction with the current group of political makeup in DC.

Guest said:

The last sentence should have read:

"That is why net neutrality in America is a dead horse, a futile movement that has no traction with because of the current group of politicians in DC."

Guest said:

I agree, i used to buy internet porn but since october of 2010 i am stayin away from it. The US and canadian governments must make all porn sites not legal and stop going after sites like limewire.

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