AMD unveils 2011-2012 roadmap for servers, desktops, laptops

By on November 10, 2010, 10:29 AM
AMD has revealed its plans for the next couple of years, including its offerings for servers, desktops, and laptops. The news comes soon after the company previewed its Brazos platform and its first Fusion APUs.

The company made the following updates to its 2012 roadmap, as always using codenames for its future products:

  • Codename Krishna: two-core 28nm APUs based on the next-generation sub-one watt Bobcat CPU cores and a DirectX 11-capable GPU, designed for tablets, notebooks, HD netbooks, and desktops
  • Codename Wichita: four-core 28nm APUs based on the next-generation sub-one watt Bobcat CPU cores and a DirectX 11-capable GPU, designed for tablets, notebooks, HD netbooks, and desktops
  • Codename Trinity: a 32nm APU based on AMD's next-generation Bulldozer CPU cores and a DirectX 11-capable GPU, designed for mainstream and high-performance desktops and notebooks
  • Codename Komodo: a 32nm CPU featuring up to 10 AMD Bulldozer CPU cores designed for high-performance and enthusiast desktops
  • Codename Terramar: a 32nm server CPU based on AMD's Bulldozer CPU core targeted for the enterprise mainstream market that will scale up to 20 cores
  • Codename Sepang: a 32nm server CPU based on AMD's Bulldozer CPU core targeted for the cost-optimized, energy efficient market that will scale up to 10 cores

AMD promised more details as the company gets closer to the launch of these products, but right now it's ready to give a high-level view of its CPU and APU pipeline. That being said, AMD Fusion is arriving early next year in mainstream and ultrathin notebooks and netbooks, as well as AIO and small form factor desktops. In other words, if you think 2012 is too long of a wait, especially given that there will likely be delays, start saving for next year's shipping products.

"AMD's business model has consistently delivered operating profits this year, while the strength of our platform offerings drove continued expansion of our customer base," Dirk Meyer, AMD president and CEO, said in a statement. "The industry is at an inflection point, with users demanding technology that is more immersive and interactive. With our upcoming AMD Fusion APUs combining our DirectX 11-capable graphics processors and next-generation microprocessors on a single chip, we are poised to lead the industry's next computing era with richer, more vivid digital experiences."





User Comments: 25

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Cryptopsy said:

Waw pretty sweet! Technologies go so fast! Amazing future expected

zogo said:

AMD has already fulfilled the upcoming year with amazing technology (can't wait to see Bulldozer performance), what about their competitors?! We can expect a busy and interesting year full of new and more powerfull technology!

LinkedKube LinkedKube, TechSpot Project Baby, said:

This doesn't help much. They're still a year behind intel. AMD you guys need to step your game up a little, thx.

kevin1212 said:

I saw on fudzilla that intell will have 22nm cpu's by late next year, if that is the case then AMD will indeed still be behind. Fusion is certainly a step in the right direction, and i suspect bulldozer will be great too, but if intel stays ahead, as much as i like AMD, i will still be buying from intel. Hopefully AMD can overtake them soon.

Razerblade said:

I think Intel is way ahead of the game at the moment but these do look promising. Should be an interesting couple of years to see what both companies produce. Look forward to the first reviews/comparisons!

Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

So far it sounds promising, but the only evidence I have read are these kind of articles about it and the odd shady youtube video? can't they have a proper "on stage" anouncment and a proper demo of other people other than AMD engineers using the chips?

It would also be nice to see the lower power chips running in an actual netbook as well rather than a bare motherboard on a worstation desk.

spyx said:

Thats funny for a second there why wallet..........seamed......kinda..........gulp......empty O.o

this all seems nice I am a gadget geek i would by all this stuff if i had the $ but sadly .....anyways i hope these are not too over priced

---agissi--- ---agissi---, TechSpot Paladin, said:

kevin1212 said:

I saw on fudzilla that intell will have 22nm cpu's by late next year, if that is the case then AMD will indeed still be behind. Fusion is certainly a step in the right direction, and i suspect bulldozer will be great too, but if intel stays ahead, as much as i like AMD, i will still be buying from intel. Hopefully AMD can overtake them soon.

My thoughts exactly. Between Intel's and AMD's news I really feel as if AMD till continue to trail a year behind and aint gonna get that crown back or even Rival Intel's for that matter. Sad..

UT66 said:

Trinity? must... resist... bad ... joke... argh.

what do you think sad keanu? whoa...

buttus said:

The Fusion promises to be a most interesting product and has the most potential for AMD to corner a market. I'm pretty impressed with them and their business model. Even though they technically compete with Intel, they really are just doing their own thing and are slowly making gains in both servers and notebooks which have been Intel strong points.

taea00 said:

This doesn't point out whether they've closed the gap on Intel though. I love AMD, but I don't think their speed is up to par currently.

TeamworkGuy2 said:

I had a question, what socket will "bulldozer" CPUs be using?

I am interested in the "Zambezi" and "Llano" CPUs, as they appear to be the major desktop players in the near future, although I guess that is obvious from the pictures.

Still, pricing and performance will be very interesting.

sMILEY4ever said:

supersmashbrada said:

This doesn't help much. They're still a year behind intel. AMD you guys need to step your game up a little, thx.

Not really a year.

Anyways, I can't wait for bulldozer vs sandy bridge.

Vrmithrax Vrmithrax, TechSpot Paladin, said:

TeamworkGuy2 said:

I had a question, what socket will "bulldozer" CPUs be using?

I am interested in the "Zambezi" and "Llano" CPUs, as they appear to be the major desktop players in the near future, although I guess that is obvious from the pictures.

Still, pricing and performance will be very interesting.

Last I heard, it was supposed to be the AM3+ socket... Same socket, new pinouts, and tied to DDR3 only. Not sure if it's going to have any kind of backwards compatibility with AM3 or not.

ET3D, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Interesting that the next gen high end CPU will not have DX11 integrated, only the generation after that. I guess it will take until the next gen to figure out how to integrate integrated graphics with a discrete GPU that high end buyers will have. Either that or the next gen integrated GPU will be powerful enough to satisfy most users.

Jibberish18 said:

I wonder, will their processors finally give decent battery life to laptops?

KG363 KG363 said:

I love roadmaps, but i hate to see them fail

bioflex said:

enough with all these road maps and images already.....just make sure u deliver.

klepto12 klepto12, TechSpot Paladin, said:

i for one cant wait for AMD to deliver on there new cpus i hope they can compete with intels new cpu's . I think if AMD doesn't do something fast they will only go down hill after there bulldozer architecture Intel has a huge lead and amd needs to close the gap.

Archean Archean, TechSpot Paladin, said:

klepto12 said:

I think if AMD doesn't do something fast they will only go down hill after there bulldozer architecture Intel has a huge lead and amd needs to close the gap.

I don't think so, AMD will probably still continue to be very competitive in the entry + mainstream level (price/performance ratio wise); which should keep them afloat easily enough. Key is how they improve their fusion stuff for the future, because right now these offerings are 'insufficient' even for casual gamers, so I'd rather say good luck to AMD because we do 'need' competition, or else we may end up in a similar situation like what happened due to delay in fermi based products.

ET3D, TechSpot Paladin, said:

kg363 said:

I love roadmaps, but i hate to see them fail

To quote Douglas Adams: "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by."

xcelofjkl said:

I really hope AMD beats the crap out of Intel these next years. I've been a loyal supporter having gone through the Duron, Athlon, AthlonXP, Athlon64, and now Phenom II. I'm looking forward to some Bulldozer to bulldoze some Bridges - may it be the Sandy or Ivy kind.

jazboy said:

Looks very promising.

pinya said:

i hope amd would at least have the same performance of the core i series.... and hopefully better power consumption.

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

I don't think so, AMD will probably still continue to be very competitive in the entry + mainstream level (price/performance ratio wise); which should keep them afloat easily enough. Key is how they improve their fusion stuff for the future, because right now these offerings are 'insufficient' even for casual gamers, so I'd rather say good luck to AMD because we do 'need' competition, or else we may end up in a similar situation like what happened due to delay in fermi based products.

AMD's main problem is that they like to release roadmaps...unfortunately the roads are built at the same pace that the Crazy Horse memorial is being sculpted at.

As long as AMD remain a hardware only company I think that they will find it hard gaining any significant ground on Intel. Magny Cours (Opteron 6000 series) was supposed to be the "Xeon killer" in servers. Reception....luke warm at best. Intel are ahead in both process node (and by extrapolation performance/watt) and the range of applications favouring their achitecture - hardly surpising given that Intel's compilers seem in widespread use both in workstation and HPC enviroments (note: AMD compilers = zero).

APU will probably be a damned-if-you-do-and-damned-if-you-don't scenario. At present AMD can sell a CPU and a discrete graphics card to the same customer. While selling that same customer an APU will probably gain marketshare in CPU sales against Intel, it also amount to one less graphics sale to the same customer. Lest we forget the vast majority of computer users will have no need for an on-die (CPU) graphics + discrete card. They are going to have to get Fusion selling in vast quantities to maintain revenue.

The elephant in the room concerning graphics is that the demands of the majority of future games is unlikely to require any significant upgrading of graphics hardware in the foreseeable future. Cards are already in release that can max out all but the most demanding of games at HD screen resolution, and sales of this generations cards (and those to be released soon) are predicated almost entirely upon the graphics horsepower needed for 5760 x 1080 + resolutions (Eyefinity/nvidia surround) and 3D gaming. I would doubt that the customer base requiring either would grow at the same rate that each successive generation of cards is being released at.

The third part of the equation is linked to the first. AMD has had to spread it's R&D resources fairly thinly due to fighting on both the CPU and graphics fronts. They definitely do not have the same resources to call on that Intel can, and probably never will, and are only making significant headway in graphics due to nvidia's slipups and TSMC's 40 and 32nm woes. I sincerely doubt that AMD would have have received such a shot in the arm that the revenue from the HD5000 series brought had nvidia's original targets been met a year ago (i.e.marketing what would effectively be the GTX 580/570/460/560 against the HD 5970/5870/5850). If history tells us anything, it's that one bad/late misstep in graphics can be catastrophic for a company (see HD 2900XT, GF100) and that the next catastrophe can be your next graphics decision.

AMD can't afford to slacken up on either the CPU/APU or graphics fronts (they also need to adhere to their roadmap timetable...or not release them). Intel I don't think will be that forgiving in the marketplace, and if the scuttlebutt doing the rounds that Intel and nvidia have reached an out-of-court settlement (regarding nvidia's suit concerning being locked out of the chipset market) is true - and that Intel will be handing over ~$US1 billion to nvidia (presumeably including licensing of SLI by Intel and possibly nvidia being able to manufacture boards using Intel CPU's) then nvidia's coffers would be well and truly bulging with potential R&D funds. nvidia have proven to be fairly resourceful even in the face of overwheming odds ( HD 5000 series) to the point of posting a profit of $US85m despite only fielding one good volume graphics card (GTX 460)....and an extra billion dollars would surely translate into more competition for AMD.

I most certainly hope that AMD can carry this off. Put simply, they need to execute rather than talking about executing. Roadmaps and pretty slide decks raise expectation and every missed deadline and every missed design goal erodes confidence in those whose expectations have not been met. From a graphics standpoint they most definitely need the "Gaming Evolved" program to actually produce results- not for the advertising revenue and gaming community kudos (though very welcome they would be) but to further transform PC gaming to the point where a discrete graphics card (or 2) remains a necessity for good gameplay. Relying on third party software developers to keep pushing the graphics boundaries without help is wholly unrealistic.

(Sorry for the editorial! -but the subject seemed to require something a little more involved that "do better"

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