DNP says its durable, flexible plastic is better than Gorilla Glass

By on December 6, 2012, 8:30 AM

Dai Nippon Printing (DNP) has announced a new type of durable plastic sheet that the company believes will replace the chemically-hardened glass panels currently used by smartphones and tablets. With a pencil hardness of up to 9H, the new plastic cover is said to be about as strong as Gorilla Glass, yet it offers many additional benefits.

The product -- which doesn't seem to have a name yet -- is comprised of three parts: a fingerprint-proof layer on the outside, a piece of plastic in the middle and a hardening agent applied to the back. All told, the substrate measures from 0.5mm to 1.5mm thick depending on what's needed and weighs about half as much as glass solutions.

Along with its 9H pencil hardness, DNP's cover is highly abrasion resistant. The company says that it rubbed the sheet's surface 200 times at a weight of 500g/cm2 with steel wool and no scratches resulted. Given those results, DNP says that its plastic offering is much less likely to scratch or crack than alternative glass-based products.

Besides conventional smartphones, tablets, laptops and other electronics, DNP notes that its plastic substrate would be ideal for upcoming flexible electronics using an OLED display, as sheets measuring 1.0mm thick can bend to a diameter of up to 140mm, while that number jumps to 90mm when dealing with 0.5mm-thick sheets.

The company's clarity tests showed a haze of 0.4% and a transmittance of 91.2%, while its fingerprint test revealed a contact angle of 103 degrees for water and 56 degrees for oil. We can't quantify those figures, but DNP is confident enough to project roughly $121 million in revenue for 2014 after the sheets hit mass production next year.




User Comments: 13

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1 person liked this | Kneep said:

This looks promising, specially being finger print proof, this should push Corning to produce Gorilla Glass into the construction market now, I'd like hard to break glass in the home, safer for kids when it comes to sliding glass doors as well

1 person liked this | ReederOnTheRun ReederOnTheRun said:

Sounds pretty epic if you ask me

Guest said:

If I were the CEO of apple, I will use this to replace the aluminum unibody used in iphone 5.. so, the iPhone next gen could be thinner, lighter, and more durable(scratch resistant like iPhone 4S and drop-proof than iPhone 5) :D

VitalyT VitalyT said:

No more solid products - huh?

Guest said:

I wish my Galaxy S3 had a plastic screen. The first and only time I dropped it it broke. It fell from almost 4 feet and landed on its face. The bottom portion near the button shattered, the screen itself went black. I then had it checked out and I was told they could not fix it.

They should also allow you to attach a little rope to put your hand through like you can with a camera. I'm now back using my old Galaxy S2 which oddly enough is not gorilla glass yet it has sustained at least fifteen, maybe even twenty drops. It only has some minor scratches. :/

1 person liked this | VitalyT VitalyT said:

No can do, patented by Apple, called iLeash.

MilwaukeeMike said:

This looks promising, specially being finger print proof, this should push Corning to produce Gorilla Glass into the construction market now, I'd like hard to break glass in the home, safer for kids when it comes to sliding glass doors as well

If you read the article on Gorilla Glass in Wired a couple months back, they talked about how it was actually invented something like 30 years ago. They couldn't find a good use for it though. They wanted to make windshields out of it, but extra hard windshields aren't good if you fly into one in a crash. They ended up shelving the stuff until smartphones came along.

m4a4 m4a4 said:

This looks promising, specially being finger print proof, this should push Corning to produce Gorilla Glass into the construction market now, I'd like hard to break glass in the home, safer for kids when it comes to sliding glass doors as well

If you read the article on Gorilla Glass in Wired a couple months back, they talked about how it was actually invented something like 30 years ago. They couldn't find a good use for it though. They wanted to make windshields out of it, but extra hard windshields aren't good if you fly into one in a crash. They ended up shelving the stuff until smartphones came along.

True... It would almost be like hitting a brick wall (and I would personally want broken glass and a few cuts than a broken body)...

avoidz avoidz said:

Very nice. Good to lose some weight from mobile, laptop and tablet screens.

Pan Wah said:

I can't get my gorilla to use a glass, always gets Jack Daniels all over his fur.

avoidz avoidz said:

I can't get my gorilla to use a glass, always gets Jack Daniels all over his fur.

Just drink from the bottle then.

Pan Wah said:

Just drink from the bottle then.

I do, it's the damn gorilla that's the problem...

avoidz avoidz said:

I do, it's the damn gorilla that's the problem...

Monkey see, monkey do.

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