Google partners with charity to supply schools with $99 Chromebooks

By on December 10, 2012, 6:00 PM

Google has partnered up with an online charity to provide classrooms with low-cost Chromebooks for the holidays. From now through December 21, educators can request discounted Chromebooks through DonorsChoose.org, a Kickstarter-like charity that focuses on projects submitted by public schools.

According to the promotion rules, teachers can apply for up to 30 Chromebooks, which are priced at only $99 each. This request is posted online where it may (or may not) be fulfilled by donors, just like Kickstarter. DonorsChoose has a FAQ page that provides a decent scope of how the service works.

Although this is intended to be a charitable exchange, we imagine teachers could submit their requests and then fund their own projects, effectively purchasing their own devices. Google's $99 asking price includes management and support ($30 alone), while the Samsung Series 5 typically goes for $399.

The Series 5 offers a 12.1-inch 1280x800 display, a dual-core 1.66GHz Intel Atom N570 processor, 2GB of RAM, a 16GB SSD (Chrome OS is largely cloud-based), a 4-in-1 memory card slot, dual-band Wi-Fi and optional 3G, a micro-VGA port with a VGA adapter, two USB 2.0 ports and up to 8.5 hours of run time.

Although Chromebooks haven't exactly been a hit among consumers, Google notes that more than a thousand schools have adopted the systems, including three districts who have deployed thousands of Google's notebooks. They're a little light on horsepower, but Chromebooks are sufficient for basic tasks such as researching, word processing, building presentations and collaborating with others.




User Comments: 15

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beancube beancube said:

Good, we can develop more stuffs for our kids now. Thanks.

Pan Wah said:

Bonus for education, top PR for Google, everyone's a winner?

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

Mercifully, for $99.00, they likely won't be able to equip these notebooks with remotely activate-able web cams to spy on students. Lower Merion School District in Pennsylvania did just that, and it seems they've now paid the price: [link]

Still in all, boys and girls, I'd beware of Greeks, or search engines whose name begins with a capital "G", bearing gifts.

Zoltan Head said:

Still in all, boys and girls, I'd beware of Greeks, or search engines whose name begins with a capital "G", bearing gifts.

What a terrible, cynical, wise attitude!

Guest said:

Big corporations giving away cheap \ free gifts to children. Hmmmmm!

How about just paying your damn taxes

Zoltan Head said:

Big corporations giving away cheap \ free gifts to children. Hmmmmm!

How about just paying your damn taxes

Do they not pay taxes?

MilwaukeeMike said:

Big corporations giving away cheap \ free gifts to children. Hmmmmm!

How about just paying your damn taxes

Do they not pay taxes?

The other story about Google today on the front page is about how they saved $2 billion in taxes by sending revenue to bermuda because bermuda has no corporate tax rate.

At the tax rate of 35% for corporations they must have sent $5.7 billion dollars to bermuda to avoid paying 2 billion in taxes.

Guest said:

LOL... Google is trying to get them when their young, sucking the teet at an even younger age.

1 person liked this | Pan Wah said:

The other story about Google today on the front page is about how they saved $2 billion in taxes by sending revenue to bermuda because bermuda has no corporate tax rate.

At the tax rate of 35% for corporations they must have sent $5.7 billion dollars to bermuda to avoid paying 2 billion in taxes.

It's not illegal though, is it?

Zoltan Head said:

It's not illegal though, is it?

The very point I was alluding to above, it may be annoying but the big boys pay the taxes required by the prevalent laws where they are trading, so as you say, no law broken (I'm quite sure they pay experts a fortune to make sure of this!)

P.S. Recent big story in UK about this type of issue with Starbucks, they were eventually bullied by the media into a payment even though they hadn't broken the law, why can't a state change the laws if they're wrong?

avoidz avoidz said:

It's like a Google Happy Meal.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

It's like a Google Happy Meal.
You mean full of grease and empty calories....?

avoidz avoidz said:

You mean full of grease and empty calories....?

I mean imprinting young minds with brand awareness through a pleasant experience.

Pan Wah said:

I mean imprinting young minds with brand awareness through a pleasant experience.

Through the medium of grease & empty calories?

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

Yeah well, after a great deal of careful consideration and soul searching, I think Google's motives are something more along these lines....

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