Larger-than-usual Patch Tuesday to address 57 security vulnerabilities

By on February 11, 2013, 6:30 PM

Microsoft’s monthly Patch Tuesday is upon us and this time, Windows users are in store for a much larger batch of fixes than usual. A recent post on Technet highlights the fact that tomorrow’s update will address 57 different security vulnerabilities that will require 12 individual updates to repair.

Updates this month will target a number of different applications including Windows itself, Windows Server, Exchange, Office, Internet Explorer and the .NET Framework. We are told that five of the 12 patches are classified as critical in nature. This means that they will fix vulnerabilities that could allow a hacker to execute malicious code on a user’s computer.

Two of the critical patches are said to fix security holes in all version of Internet Explorer since version six. Translated – all current versions of Windows, including Windows 8 and Windows RT are currently at risk. If you haven’t done so already, it might be a good idea to switch to a different web browser until you have the opportunity to patch IE.

Microsoft points out that another critical patch is aimed at Windows XP, Vista and Server 2003. A separate patch is only necessary for those still running XP while the final patch will keep those using Exchange a bit safer.

If you have automatic updates enabled, critical updates will be automatically installed for you tomorrow. The rest of the updates, only rated as important, will need to be installed manually. Unsurprisingly, the software giant recommends that users also pick up the important updates as they could help systems from being compromised.




User Comments: 15

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1 person liked this | Nima304 said:

"If you haven?t done so already, it might be a good idea to switch to a different web browser until you have the opportunity to patch IE."

Or, just stay on that different web browser..

davislane1 davislane1 said:

Ha! I hope every iSheep dumb enough to ignore proper security practices gets malware! ...What do you mean this isn't another OSX vulnerability?! Isn't this the Mac forum?!?!?!

3 people like this | Chazz said:

As if other browsers don't have vulnerabilities. I'll stick to my firefox, but I won't be deluded into thinking it's safe.

Skidmarks Skidmarks said:

I'm not aware of anyone that still uses IE. Could be wrong though.

Guest said:

So many patches every month. Does this mean that there is so much sloppy programming!!!

jobeard jobeard, TS Ambassador, said:

So many patches every month. Does this mean that there is so much sloppy programming!!!
DUH! but of course - - tons of stuff goes out the door without being tested other than one environment. Testing takes time & time -> money. Even Apple fell into shipping Apple Maps w/o sufficient testing.

This is the "COST" of technology today {hint:- recall they issue recalls for issues with automobiles }

SNGX1275 SNGX1275, TS Forces Special, said:

I'm not aware of anyone that still uses IE. Could be wrong though.

I used IE 10 on Win 8 for a bit, it really seemed fine to me. I continued using Opera though, because I have used it for about 12 or 13 years now. However, in the last week I've reluctantly switched to Chrome. Opera has gotten slower for me, on 3 different operating systems (win 8, win 7, os x 10.7) since somewhere around Opera 10.5. I'm not sure how they show benchmarks for it improving on every major release because it certainly doesn't 'feel' faster.

Timonius Timonius said:

Crap - BSOD on Windows 7 after this update (first in at least 2 years) - thank goodness for restore points. Going to have to install the patches one at a time. Anyone else?

tipstir tipstir, TS Ambassador, said:

I don't use IE anymore. I have that disabled by default. I use Chrome, Maxthon and Opera. This is it.. Patches well you just have to live with these patches for the life of the OS. They'll never get it right, so they just patch as they go. If they had spent more time fixing the OS correctly except for rushing it out then would ease the pain of using the OS as it is. Windows 8 and Windows 7 are no different both have pretty much the same issues when it comes to the OS System Files. Both the System and Registry needs to be cleaned out. Also those hidden files that contains junk data that don't get cleaned. So patches will be around always!

richalone442 said:

After downloading and installing these updates, my computer forgot where the boot data was, and I had to figure out how to tell it where the OS was by going into the MoBds hard drives to get the Boot drive, I hate how MS updates do this about 2 or 3 times a year

Timonius Timonius said:

After downloading and installing these updates, my computer forgot where the boot data was, and I had to figure out how to tell it where the OS was by going into the MoBds hard drives to get the Boot drive, I hate how MS updates do this about 2 or 3 times a year

Yeah! That is what seemed to happen to me. It looked like it was trying to find the OS on the E drive (in my case) as opposed to the usual C drive. Good thing restore points worked.

tipstir tipstir, TS Ambassador, said:

You got to keep the OS system clean prior to installing the upgrades. No issues installing the Upgrades on a Genuine Windows OS. If your system has issues and the patches installed on top of these issues going to have more issues.

learninmypc learninmypc said:

What really cracks me up is all the people that complain about MS/IE but continue to use it.

If you don't like it that much, why are you still using it?

This is not directed at anybody in here specifically, just in general.

That said, what is the bologna about IE alledgedly being able to be uninstalled by user on W7 I think it was?

Guest said:

If you have not yet heard of it. Look up windows subversion! I was / am a victim myself, it is the most sinister of all hacks, you are not supposed to notice, while a very large group of master linux programmers, and even "inside" connections at Microsoft, use windows server 3.0 and lots of linux goodies to take silent and total control of your PC, They Boot After the TPM chip, they use an Apple disk overlay called Apple bootstrap, to control your boot, they re write the registry, Disable your printer, then disk burning is denied, as is transfer to a USB device. They do Not want any of their exploits to leave evidence, A new hard drive is instantly infected, as they reserve a chunk of BIOS/ CMOS to rewrite the controls on the new disk at first boot. I have been struggling with them for 5 1/2 months now. And I am a retired electrical engineer who worked many years at Rockwell Int. Defense Electronics plant that was in Fullerton Ca. I just cannot get them totally out! Microsoft is so unhelpful that I suspect they want it kept a secret. These guys have really thought out every angle and a block for any cure!

BEWARE!!!!! THE OUTFIT IS WORLD WIDE AND IS CALLED SFNETOPS.

Good luck to all !!!!!

An ongoing Victim.

2 people like this | jobeard jobeard, TS Ambassador, said:

Hmm; UNLESS you are a programmer and work with open source projects,

Subversion is not for you - - regardless of platform {Mac, Windows, Linux, Unix, Mainframe}. This client software tool is used to fetch updates to source code projects to your system where you then compile, link and test the program(s) being built.

My gut reaction to hearing Subversion was used to infect a local system is:

never access remote systems while logged on as an administrator or root user. Doing that is like walking butt naked in the middle of the street and then crying when they haul you off to jail.

I'm not insensitive to system corruptions, but extremely allergic to massive stupidity.

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