Store a copy of your keys in the cloud with KeyMe

By on August 9, 2013, 7:30 AM

If you’ve ever locked yourself out of your house or hastily left on a cross-country business trip without leaving a set of keys behind for a loved one, odds are you are all too familiar with how much of a pain in the rear it can be. Having to hire a locksmith to regain entry to your home isn’t exactly cheap but fortunately, that inconvenience can now be a thing of the past thanks to KeyMe.

KeyMe is a startup that allows its users to store digital copies of their keys in the cloud. Using the iOS app, users are prompted to take a photo of each side of a key under the guidance of the app. When you need to make a copy, you can order one directly from the company starting at $4.99 and it will arrive within 2-3 business days.

Alternately, you can take the images to any key maker and by following the instructions on the app, they should be able to create a functional replacement for you. Another scenario could see you send a digital copy of your key to someone else that is also using the app. That way, they could create a key to your home in the event you are out of town or aren’t able to get off work when they arrive. Should you happen to live in or around New York City, the company has multiple kiosk locations that can carve up replacement key on the spot.

Key images are stored securely in the cloud using advanced levels of encryption and password protection. What’s more, sensitive information like your address isn’t stored on KeyMe’s end. That data is temporarily used when you place an order for a replacement and is then discarded, we’re told.

The app itself is available free of charge but you’ll need to shell out $9.99 for access to duplication instructions should you need them.




User Comments: 18

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3 people like this | BMfan BMfan said:

Burglars and Hackers unite.

1 person liked this | NTAPRO NTAPRO said:

I like the idea, but I'm not sold on it. It would probably be better than having to break into the house, which can get awkward sometimes

2 people like this | misor misor said:

LOL, the consumer will wait for 2-3 days for the key to arrive.

as the unit owner rests in a rented room, the burglar patiently waits for the key to arrive and assumes the identity of the owner when the key arrives.

I like the idea, but I'm not sold on it. It would probably be better than having to break into the house, which can get awkward sometimes

agree with you @NTAPRO.

as an alternative to this 'key cloud business', I prefer the 'rock key business'. ; no hassle, no fee, always available ASAP.

MilwaukeeMike said:

as an alternative to this 'key cloud business', I prefer the 'rock key business'. ; no hassle, no fee, always available ASAP.

No kidding... there's a reason that solution has been around forever.

RenGood08 RenGood08 said:

Burglars and Hackers unite.

Exactly what I was thinking. I get technology is pretty awesome. But this is taking it too far!

treetops treetops said:

If a burglar has your key why would they need a copy? It says you can also bring it to any locksmith, so no waiting. Then there is the interesting fact that anyone with your key can also make a copy at any locksmith unless the key says do not duplicate. Which such a wont work on this app either. This is a great app.

-Common sense

Guest said:

Agreed, no more leaving house/car keys lying around quick pic by someone and instant key, but maybe times are coming to we will need no keys soon and be logging into our homes and the only thing have to worry about losing is your password. but yeah there could be a time when this comes in handy maybe in some situation but just cant see myself using it.

Guest said:

Nothing in the cloud is secure. No matter how many security measures there are, there is always a way to bypass protocol (internal company employees getting bought out, etc).

I can foresee the ridiculousness that will occur whenever this gets hacked. Changing the locks on your doors is a little more involved than just changing the password to your email account.

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Burglars and Hackers unite.

Of course, everyone wants to replay their favorite movie. lol

Can you picture a stranger taking a snapshot of your keys? They would have a hard time taking a snapshot of my keys. But people often throw their keys down and walk off for a minute or two.

Lets not even mention, how many people allow others to park their vehicle.

1 person liked this | Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

I don't know what it is with some people and their keys but this this app is worthless to me.

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I don't know what it is with some people and their keys but this this app is worthless to me.

lol

That probably just means you are not a thief.

Guest said:

No thanks. NSA is already looking thru my private pictures on skydrive, now they will also have they keys to my house?! Nothing in the US is safe in the cloud. Thank you Obama.

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Thank you Obama.
In all fairness, it didn't start with him. You can point a finger, just don't make him out to be the only one.

deiong deiong said:

Wow, I think I won the contest of finding the news article with the worst idea for an app.. think the fart apps are a step above this one :) who wouldn't hire.

"Having to hire a locksmith to regain entry to your home isn?t exactly cheap but fortunately, that inconvenience can now be a thing of the past thanks to KeyMe." the only person I know who would sit around waiting to get into the house for 2-3 business days.. anytime someone looses there key they want access pretty much within the next few hours... its why locksmiths are so expensive. im sure if they took 2 to 3 business days to get the door opened for you it would cost 3 bucks as well. it never ceases to amaze me how we can be so smart to put people on the moon, but then at the same time people have a company all around this..... from one extreme to the extreme opposite... I cant image anyone would ever use this service...

Guest said:

NSA wants your door key

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

No thanks. NSA is already looking thru my private pictures on skydrive, now they will also have they keys to my house?! Nothing in the US is safe in the cloud. Thank you Obama.
Fight back! Install a hi-def video camera in the bowl of your toilet, and stream those pictures to your Skydrive account.

Don't forget, you must be at least 18 years of age, and post a warning stating that you must be at least 18 years of age to view these pictures.

On a lighter note, since you most likely be suing yourself over the pictures, you don't have to bother with a model release form.

Guest said:

Yeaaah!!

now I found a way to drive my dad's car without him knowing :P

or even take a pic of my room's keys, because my mother always hides them lol

SNGX1275 SNGX1275, TS Forces Special, said:

"Having to hire a locksmith to regain entry to your home isn?t exactly cheap but fortunately, that inconvenience can now be a thing of the past thanks to KeyMe." the only person I know who would sit around waiting to get into the house for 2-3 business days..

You know how I know you didn't read the entire article...?

Now you have a picture of the key, and instructions (although for more money) on how to make a copy of it. I'm sure a good key maker/locksmith can make a duplicate from a photo, but for the regular Lowes/Walmart employee the instructions or numbers to punch in to their automated machine are probably helpful.

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