Quantum dot displays may be the future of HDTVs

By on September 13, 2013, 4:30 PM
tv, led, television, hd, quantum, hdtvs, quantum dot

As with most electronic devices, the industry moves fast. TVs are no exception and have quickly progressed from cathode ray tubes to the popular LED displays of today. Although many have pointed to 3D technology as the next big thing, the real breakthrough might just be quantum dots.

Unlike LCDs, LEDs or OLEDs, quantum dots do not rely on different chemicals to produce different colors. Alternatively, these nanoscale structures are given their distinct hue based upon only their size. This means that a single material can be used to create an entire display (consisting of red, green and blue emitters, among others), reducing the inherent manufacturing costs.

A secondary advantage of the technology is that it is both environmentally friendly and relatively easy to commercialize. The continuous flow process is not only green, but makes scaling from small volumes to large ones quite efficient. The materials involved are also non-toxic and do not contain the rare earth metals that often drive up prices.

In describing the technology, CEO Stephen Squires of Quantum Materials, explained, “Tetrapod Quantum Dots ultimately allow for lower display manufacturing costs due to their superior luminescence and much lower incidence of aggregation. Far fewer quantum dots are required to achieve the same level of performance.”

Perhaps the most exciting thing about these “QD-LED” displays is that mass production may come sooner than you think. New reports suggest that a major Asian electronics manufacturer is joining forces with Quantum Materials to make quantum dot TVs a reality. This news is very encouraging, especially when one considers all of the benefits: it’s lighter, brighter, provides enhanced contrast, and is more energy efficient than current offerings.

Furthermore, if a 2013 report published by Wintergreen Research is to be trusted, once one manufacturer takes the plunge, the rest will have no other choice but to follow suit. In the competitive TV industry, no company wants to be left in the dust.




User Comments: 16

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wastedkill said:

The only people that pointed towards 3D technology as the next big thing are people with enough money in their pocket to purchase a few jets other than that 3D technology is completely useless like a corpse on a sunny day.

MilwaukeeMike said:

Not to be a cynic , but if something sounds too good to be true, that's because it is. Brighter, Better, more colorful, low power, and cheap? Well.. maybe not cheap, no word on that yet. Maybe that'll be the catch.

9Nails, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I welcome lower priced larger displays. But as to QDLED's, I'll wait until something hits the shelf to see if the promise ever gets delivered.

Vrmithrax Vrmithrax, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Not to be a cynic , but if something sounds too good to be true, that's because it is. Brighter, Better, more colorful, low power, and cheap? Well.. maybe not cheap, no word on that yet. Maybe that'll be the catch.

Based on what I've read (been keeping tabs on quantum dots since they first "discovered" the phenomena a while ago)... The manufacturing techniques, once someone gets them going and refines them a little, are potentially much simpler and cheaper. I'm sure the first ones will be premium priced, just like every other new technology when it hits the market, but this has the potential to give us much larger screens for lower prices, once they are mainstream.

Tekkaraiden Tekkaraiden said:

Sounds interesting.

GunsAblazin said:

If there are so many benefits why aren't they already being made? There's got to be a catch; they probably haven't figured out how to actually make one yet, lol.

JC713 JC713 said:

Definitely has potential.

MrAnderson said:

I look forward to seeing first hand what this new technology can do. I'm glad it is better for the environment and requires less rare materials too.

Railman said:

Would this technology give similar results with existing technology? Can we expect 4k screens with decent frame rates at reasonable cost?

Sherlock said:

I welcome lower priced larger displays. But as to QDLED's, I'll wait until something hits the shelf to see if the promise ever gets delivered.

QDLED Lighting has already made its' initial commercial appearance via studio lighting by 2 different commercial fresnel manufacturers ( here's one of them: molerichardsoncompany.wordpress.com/tag/quantum-dot-led-fres
el/ ) & there is every reason to believe that is only the start of much-wider mainstream QD apps in the lighting sector.

Sherlock said:

I welcome lower priced larger displays. But as to QDLED's, I'll wait until something hits the shelf to see if the promise ever gets delivered.

Already here: engadget.com/2013/01/14/sony-triluminos-quantum-dot-qdvision/

Sherlock said:

If there are so many benefits why aren't they already being made? There's got to be a catch; they probably haven't figured out how to actually make one yet, lol.

LOL ?

Besides the other now-commercialized QD display & lightings apps I've already outlined , try LOL at Google , who just got their patent formally approved for the primary optics component in their new much-publicized Google Glasses...to wit; "Quantum Dot Near-to-Eye Display": google.com/patents/US8508830

GunsAblazin said:

LOL ?

Besides the other now-commercialized QD display & lightings apps I've already outlined , try LOL at Google , who just got their patent formally approved for the primary optics component in their new much-publicized Google Glasses...to wit; "Quantum Dot Near-to-Eye Display": google.com/patents/US8508830

What I meant was besides it being "relatively easy to commercialize" and it's "reduced inherent manufacturing costs" no company has yet to bring it to the public. The "LOL" was to the television manufacturing companies, not the technology.

GunsAblazin said:

Already here: engadget.com/2013/01/14/sony-triluminos-quantum-dot-qdvision/

I'm not so sure sony is using quantum dots, as there TV is listed as "LED" backlit, not QLED.

[link]

GunsAblazin said:

Already here: engadget.com/2013/01/14/sony-triluminos-quantum-dot-qdvision/

I'm not so sure sony is using quantum dots, as there TV is listed as "LED" backlit, not QLED.

[link]

It is also listed as an LCD display. So, no QD Displays are not here.

Sherlock said:

If there are so many benefits why aren't they already being made? There's got to be a catch; they probably haven't figured out how to actually make one yet, lol.

Check....the World is Flat.....gotcha' ;(

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