Yahoo to encrypt all products in light of NSA spying revelations

By on November 19, 2013, 3:00 PM
google, yahoo, nsa, government, spying, encryption, anti-terrorism

Yahoo on Monday vowed to do more to protect user data in the midst of numerous reports over the last six months about the US government secretly accessing such information from tech companies without their knowledge or permission.

In a blog post on the matter, CEO Marissa Mayer reiterated the fact that her company has never given access to their data centers to the NSA or any other government agency. She pointed out there was nothing more important than protecting users’ privacy and to that end, she is extending the recently announced https (SSL - Secure Sockets Layer) encryption with a 2048-bit key for Yahoo Mail across all Yahoo products.

The tentative plan is to encrypt all information that moves between their data centers by the end of Q1 2014, offer users an option to encrypt all data flow to/from Yahoo by the end of Q1 2014 and work closely with their international Mail partners to ensure co-branded accounts are also https-enabled.

If you recall, Yahoo announced plans to beef up security on Yahoo Mail last month. The company went public with those plans on the same day the Washington Post revealed the NSA has collected hundreds of thousands of contact lists from e-mail and IM users around the globe as part of an anti-terrorism efforts. Yahoo said e-mail encryption efforts are expected to go live by January 8, 2014.

More recent NSA leaks from whistleblower Edward Snowden reveal the agency has infiltrated links between data centers of major Internet companies including Google and Yahoo to siphon data as part of a project known as Muscular.




User Comments: 8

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3 people like this | Guest said:

Why should anyone believe her?

I think she's lying. I think that yahoo, microsoft, google, apple, drop box, or any service provider that has more than a million users is in cahoots with the government. They're all just trying to save face now.

3 people like this | Guest said:

I don't think I will eat this.

1 person liked this | Guest said:

They all claim to have never given the NSA access. Regardless of whether that is true, the NSA has access (given or hacked). I wouldn't trust any company on American soil. I think StartMail from StartPage is going to be our best option (but even then I would be cautious).

Guest said:

Seriously .. Who gives a flying F___k. If you have something to hide from the Government, maybe DONT PUT IT ON THE INTERNET!!!!?

And I dont wanna hear any BS about personal privacy. If you are stupid enough to think there is any privacy on the Internet, you should have every electronic device you own confiscated, and be forced to live in a shack in the middle of nowhere.

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

If you are stupid enough to think there is any privacy on the Internet, you should have every electronic device you own confiscated, and be forced to live in a shack in the middle of nowhere.
Just because thats not the way it is, doesn't mean thats not the way it should be. If you are stupid enough to except ideals the way they are forced upon us, you deserve to live in a dungeon without. I wonder if you would continue to cower under those terms.

Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

Why should anyone believe her?

I think she's lying. I think that yahoo, microsoft, google, apple, drop box, or any service provider that has more than a million users is in cahoots with the government. They're all just trying to save face now.

Ok hotshot, what possible motive could she have for lying? If she is lying and gets caught out (which she will), imagine the repercussions it would have on her and Yahoo!

Guest said:

Oh please, they all are working with US govt... And the level of hypocrisy here is inconceivable. Bunch of guys, companies making anti-NSA group while pushing users to provide full name, second name and address, along with phone number - yeah, they're really taking care of users and their privacy.

Guest said:

Considering the NSA backdoors in encryptions, this won't prevent illegal hacking by the NSA>

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