U.S. government settles military piracy software lawsuit for $50 million

By on November 30, 2013, 3:30 PM
government, piracy, military, apptricity, logistics software

The US government has agreed to settle a piracy lawsuit with software maker Apptricity. It was determined that the military used pirated logistics software from Apptricity for years and despite initially seeking nearly a quarter billion in unpaid licenses, the company ultimately settled for $50 million.

Back in 2004, Apptricity agreed to license enterprise software to the US Army. The agreement permitted the Army to use the software on five servers and 150 standalone devices. Since that time, however, the software has been illegally copied and used in missions across the globe.

It wasn’t revealed that the military illegally installed the software on other devices until 2009 when the US Army Program Director noted that several thousand devices were running Apptricity software.

Specifically, Apptricity claims the government has used their software in the Middle East and to help coordinate emergency management initiatives like the relief efforts in Haiti following the January 2010 earthquake that devastated the region. In total, the software was found on 93 servers and more than 9,000 standalone devices – far more than were contracted for in 2004.

Based on licensing fees of $1.35 million per server and $5,000 per device, Apptricity said they were owed $224 million in licensing fees but after negotiations on both sides, the parties agreed on $50 million.

The issue isn’t expected to tarnish the relationship between the two as both expect to continue their business relationship moving forward. According to Tim McHale, an Apptricity senior adviser and retired major-general, the relationship will in fact grow exponentially.




User Comments: 10

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2 people like this | cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Topics like this makes the following look even that much more petty. Pirates convicting pirates, how noble we have become.

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GhostRyder GhostRyder said:

The Irony of this article...

Your right on the money @cliffordcooley

Guest said:

Same amount a single individual civilian would have had to pay IMHO.

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Same amount a single individual civilian would have had to pay IMHO.
Except it wasn't a civilian. It wasn't even corporate. It was our government once again proving they are above the law, and preaching do as I say not as I do.

Edit:

I think I will pattern my life after the military. Honestly, didn't they think of the consequences, when they decided to pirate? Didn't they think of how this would discredit so many other pirating cases? After this article, I am no longer ashamed to admit to being a pirate. How can anyone be ashamed of acting the very same way our military does? Are we not supposed to be proud of our military? It only makes you wonder how many other applications they are not licensing, while hiding behind a government security blanket.

1 person liked this | Guest said:

I meant that they would've expected the civilian man to work it down in a mine for the next 200 years, sh*t gold ingots or die trying, but yeah. You are correct on that one.

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

work it down in a mine for the next 200 years, sh*t gold ingots or die trying, but yeah.
LOL

Chuck Cortes Chuck Cortes said:

Hypocrisy at its finest.

Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

Apptricity should've made their software available on Steam then they wouldn't have been shafted so badly by the US military.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

The US government has agreed to settle a piracy lawsuit with software maker Apptricity. It was determined that the military used pirated logistics software from Apptricity for years and despite initially seeking nearly a quarter billion in unpaid licenses, the...
You know what, stuff like this doesn't phase me. I'm as thankful as hell for the "Bill of Rights". At least big brother can no longer quarter soldiers in our homes without paying...(y)

Besides, in many countries, the concept of "sovereign immunity", is absolute, or very nearly so. You should probably try suing the Chinese government sometime, see how far you get with that. OK, let me see a show of hands, how many of you think the Communist Chinese would settle a lawsuit with you, if their army pirated your software?

9Nails, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Negotiating a greater than 75% discount when they're in the wrong, is pretty good for the Army. Usually the decimal point falls the other way and the American's get the bill.

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