Holodeck-style virtual reality gets a step closer with the Inversion VR system

By on February 5, 2014, 6:45 PM

The Oculus Rift is already pushing the bounds of virtual reality gaming far beyond anything else currently possible but thus far, you’ve pretty much had to use it while sitting stationary (or with a treadmill). That’s no longer the case thanks to the Inversion VR system from Zero Latency.

The Inversion VR system is essentially a strap-on holodeck. After outfitting a room with a series of tracking cameras, the player must don a backpack with a computer inside, put on the Oculus Rift and pick up a fake gun. It may sound like a lot of work (and it probably is) but the results certainly look worth the effort.

The kit, along with their flagship game Zombie Fort: Smackdown, will be on display at PauseFest in Melbourne, Australia, later this month. Unfortunately, this isn’t really a consumer product (yet) although it is available for lease, purchase or event hire right now in its prototype state. Pricing isn’t mentioned on the company’s website but I imagine it isn’t exactly cheap.

If nothing else, this gives us a glimpse what the future of virtual reality holds for gamers.

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User Comments: 8

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ikesmasher said:

Couldnt the data all be transmitted wirelessly from and to the PC outside the room? I mean I know that causes response rate problems but as its a stationary setup you could get some really high powered gear to do that, couldnt you?

davislane1 davislane1 said:

Nothing about this says Holodeck to me. In fact, this is an entirely different form of VR technology that isn't even conceptually related to the Holodeck.

A more accurate title would be "Inversion VR Takes Player Immersion to the Next Level"

Guest said:

Ya da ya da blah blah they haven't been able to get this working since the early 90's so don't get your hopes up.

ET3D, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Ya da ya da blah blah they haven't been able to get this working since the early 90's so don't get your hopes up.

On the contrary, they had it working since the early 90's. It was just never something more than a diversion, and probably never will until the need for putting something on your eyes to see the virtual scene goes away.

Puiu Puiu said:

"You can't run" No literally you can't run, our software isn't ready yet ^_^

VitalyT VitalyT said:

I don't get it. What is there to prevent people from constantly walking into the walls?

That's why Onmni system was designed, and I don't see any feasible work-around to it...

Puiu Puiu said:

I don't get it. What is there to prevent people from constantly walking into the walls?

That's why Onmni system was designed, and I don't see any feasible work-around to it...

it seems like the virtual room was made about the same size as the room they were in so you should at least know where the walls are.

it's not going to come to consumers so it doesn't really matter. it's just a tech preview.

Gumpngreen Gumpngreen said:

Another solution would be to make walls with QR-like patterns on them that are then dynamically rendered as 3D game walls within the headset. Could even have torches and other features by having sub-patterns on the walls.

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