AMD confirms Ryzen 7000 CPU running game at 5.5 GHz was not overclocked

midian182

Posts: 7,894   +82
Staff member
Something to look forward to: AMD has revealed more details about the Computex 2022 gaming demo that showed off its upcoming Zen 4 processor hitting 5.5 GHz. According to a company executive, the chip in question wasn't overclocked and running on a 280mm consumer AIO liquid cooler.

This week has seen AMD show off its upcoming Zen 4 architecture at Computex. One of the exciting demos involved a 16-core Ryzen 7000 processor, believed to be a prototype of the Ryzen 9 7950X, running Ghostwire Tokyo at up to 5.5 GHz. AMD didn't reveal too many details about the demonstration at the time, but now we know a little more.

Speaking on PCWorld's The Full Nerd, AMD Director of Technical Marketing Robert Hallock revealed that the chip was cooled using a consumer-grade 280mm all-in-one liquid cooler from Asetek and sat in a reference AMD motherboard—AM4 coolers will be compatible with new 600-series mobos.

Hallock confirmed that the CPU was not overclocked during the test—it was running at its natural frequency—and that "most" of the threads ran at around 5.5 GHz in the demo. The overlay showed the frequency bouncing between 5.3 GHz and 5.5 GHz, but it remained well above 5 GHz throughout. Hallock did say the fluctuations depended on the game load and scene.

As we noted at the time, CPUs sometimes have to drop their frequency even on a single core during hefty workloads, so a Cinebench single-thread run might not hit 5.5 GHz, but the chip still has a much higher clock speed than current Zen 3 processors.

AMD said it will launch the Zen 4 platform sometime between September and November, when we'll also see blisteringly fast, consumer PCIe Gen 5 SSDs like these from Apacer.

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Kosmoz

Posts: 600   +1,110
AMD was Jebait-ing everyone at Computex and only blind fanbois hating them and people that do not follow tech and leaks don't know that or don't believe that.

Anyone that has more than 2 neurons knows that no company would promote a next gen product many months ahead of it's launch, if it was so mediocre as people think it will be. No one is boasting with mediocrity, not the new AMD since Zen1. This is not Raja's AMD, as you can see he went to intel to "make them better" rofl.

Anyway, intel fanbois will have a nasty surprise, for them - when AMD finally launches Zen4 and we see the final specifications.

Also I don't expect a roflstop win by Zen4 over Raptor Lake either, because I'm not an ignorant fanboi, but even a 5% win over RPL will make Pat G and his zombie fanbois regret the "AMD is in the rear view mirror" claim.

Jebait-ing and sandbagging, remember that. This also applies to "RDNA3 is disappointing" new rumors.
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 8,756   +7,668
Yeah, AMD is slipping into the same mode that made Intel un-trusted for a long time. You would think for as large as these companies are they would invest a little money into having someone act as their "historian" and do advanced research on past practices so they don't get caught up in the same stupid mistakes .....
 

Burty117

Posts: 4,488   +2,694
Thing is, I hold a decent amount of hope that the new AM5 motherboards will work for a few more generations of CPU's. Even if the CPU's are ever so slightly slower vs Intel's 13th gen when it comes to gaming, I'd go with the AMD just so I have the option of upgrading the CPU down the road.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 1,039   +772
Interesting to see how this works out given AMD was never competing with raw core speed .
So if they have 5.5 GHz plus they should have their other competitive areas

Intel and AMD will both use TMSC for their top chips ( may be wrong - and just GPU )

Anyway if AMD can get to 5.5 maybe Intel's old dream of pushing silicon faster to 6 or 7 is possible in the future - with out power and heat problems - for pentium chips .
Then again - why should it matter - software be maximised for multicore
 

DZillaXx

Posts: 527   +676
Honestly they could take Zen 3 and bump the clock speeds upto 5.5ghz and it would be an impressive performance bump. So glad to see AMD tackle one of the areas it struggled so hard to improve upon. Clock Speed. I don't expect Raptor Lake to have much of an increase, if not any at all for their P cores.

So Zen4 should be a pretty solid improvement and a huge win for X86. Zen 5 will focus more on core improvements. Zen 4 focused alot on improvements across the board, with new platform, new IO die, etc. It is just a shame we won't see 3D Cache until later for Zen4. That will be the chip to get for gaming, it was impressive seeing how much of an improvement it made with Zen 3. Zen4 doubles the L2 cache which should boost gaming performance. We won't see the 3D Cache on Zen 4 until next year. Hopefully next time stock on those products are better.
 

NeoMorpheus

Posts: 1,135   +2,263
Looks like I will be using this a lot the following months :D

7656e8bf0c9ba2e0177b0d38aff08488ba7654b311620f08fd2eb10430b140e2.gif
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,699   +6,640
Thing is, I hold a decent amount of hope that the new AM5 motherboards will work for a few more generations of CPU's. Even if the CPU's are ever so slightly slower vs Intel's 13th gen when it comes to gaming, I'd go with the AMD just so I have the option of upgrading the CPU down the road.
According to this article, AMD has said that the AM5 socket will have at least as long of a lifetime as AM4.

EDIT: Another source that says the same thing - https://www.techpowerup.com/290648/amd-socket-am5-a-long-lived-platform-ceo
 
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wiyosaya

Posts: 7,699   +6,640
Yeah, AMD is slipping into the same mode that made Intel un-trusted for a long time. You would think for as large as these companies are they would invest a little money into having someone act as their "historian" and do advanced research on past practices so they don't get caught up in the same stupid mistakes .....
I think Intel's mistakes were more egregious. For instance, attempting to hide a undeniably custom and beefy cooling solution in a public demo :rolleyes: . AMD appears to be upright about the AIO water cooler at least. Intel would be hiding their cooling solution.

Honestly, I don't think Lisa Su would stoop to such practices. She knows full well that Epyc is gaining on Xeon in the enterprise market, and after the Bulldozer fiasco from her predecessor, I don't think she is going to make that mistake again.
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 5,335   +4,980
It does look exciting... still a bit concerned that certain benchmarks aren't even beating Alder Lake... Regardless, it looks like next summer will be the time to buy a new PC - there will be plenty of options by then!
 

Fastturtle

Posts: 70   +38
One thing I haven't seen yet is how much memory does the chip support. If it's not more then 256GB, then it's useless to me. I'm already hammering 64GB quite heavily at times and the only thing keeping the system responsive is the quad Seagate 15k Cheetah drive in Raid 0 for swap/scratch space.

Worse case for me is even the doubling to 128GB is only going to hold me for a year until I have to plan an entirely new build and that may need as much as 512GB of ECC memory. Yes I deal with very large image sizes (64Mpx camera) plus lots of layers. If it's a GreyScale image, I use 256 layers - one for each grey - and some of those files easily hit 512GB of scratch space (have 1.6TB) so yea. My use case isn't normal or even common.
 

HardReset

Posts: 1,665   +1,321
One thing I haven't seen yet is how much memory does the chip support. If it's not more then 256GB, then it's useless to me. I'm already hammering 64GB quite heavily at times and the only thing keeping the system responsive is the quad Seagate 15k Cheetah drive in Raid 0 for swap/scratch space.

Worse case for me is even the doubling to 128GB is only going to hold me for a year until I have to plan an entirely new build and that may need as much as 512GB of ECC memory. Yes I deal with very large image sizes (64Mpx camera) plus lots of layers. If it's a GreyScale image, I use 256 layers - one for each grey - and some of those files easily hit 512GB of scratch space (have 1.6TB) so yea. My use case isn't normal or even common.
Perhaps it will support 256GB but if there are no 64GB DDR5 memory modules available, then not.
 

Athlonite

Posts: 314   +109
One thing I haven't seen yet is how much memory does the chip support. If it's not more then 256GB, then it's useless to me. I'm already hammering 64GB quite heavily at times and the only thing keeping the system responsive is the quad Seagate 15k Cheetah drive in Raid 0 for swap/scratch space.

Worse case for me is even the doubling to 128GB is only going to hold me for a year until I have to plan an entirely new build and that may need as much as 512GB of ECC memory. Yes I deal with very large image sizes (64Mpx camera) plus lots of layers. If it's a GreyScale image, I use 256 layers - one for each grey - and some of those files easily hit 512GB of scratch space (have 1.6TB) so yea. My use case isn't normal or even common.

Your case scenario sounds like you just went with the wrong setup for your use case where you should have gone with Threadripper instead of cheaping out with a Ryzen desktop system so really the only one to blame here is yourself for being cheap
 

Fastturtle

Posts: 70   +38
If I was building the system myself, I'd still be looking at an Epyc based SuperMicro BD-H11SSL series of server boards. Decent feature set while being far cheaper then any of the currently unavailable Threadripper boards with support for far more memory.
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 5,335   +4,980
If I was building the system myself, I'd still be looking at an Epyc based SuperMicro BD-H11SSL series of server boards. Decent feature set while being far cheaper then any of the currently unavailable Threadripper boards with support for far more memory.
But then you’re paying for the far more expensive epyc chips...
 

Fastturtle

Posts: 70   +38
But then you’re paying for the far more expensive epyc chips...
Yep, the Epyc 7232 costs $500, along with another $500 for the SuperMicro BD-H11SSL series of motherboards while any Threadripper is $1000+ if you can find one with another $1000+ for a motherboard, if you can find any. They're not being produced as the demand for the 5xxx series of chips along with even the budget Epycs is so high that they're selling everything they can make. Did they raise the prices? Not really and if you don't need the fastest/latest/greatest you can get some pretty decent prices. In my case, I don't need the fastest but I do need the increased memory support from Epyc that Thread ripper doesn't give you. The 1st Gen Threadrippers only support 128GB of memory and I'll have that in the system by July. Yes it's a stop gap as I stated earlier but it at least buys time for the company to decide if I need a AM5/Zen4 or a Zen3 Epyc. I don't think I need the latest Genoa based Epyc but that's for the comany and bean counters to decide. It may be cheaper then the 7232 I'd get if I was paying for the new system.