Latest Features

  • The Rise, Fall and Revival of AMD

    AMD is one of the oldest designers of large scale microprocessors and has been the subject of polarizing debate among technology enthusiasts for nearly 50 years. Its story makes for a thrilling tale. We'll revisit the company's past, examine the twists and turns in the path to the present, and wonder at what lies ahead.

    By Nick Evanson and Graham Singer on

  • 10 Great Free Steam Games

    We went on a hunt for 10 fantastic free (or free-to-play) Steam games. By narrowing things down so much, this list was never meant to be exhaustive nor comprehensive, but to highlight a handful of great titles.

    By Cohen Coberly on

  • What Ever Happened to Winamp?

    Developed by Nullsoft in 1997, Winamp is a media player that supports a wide array of audio formats and was an iconic software application in the heyday of MP3 music. Winamp was nearly ubiquitous, used by millions in the early 2000s.

    By Shawn Knight on

  • Explainer: What Is Chip Binning?

    You've just bought a new CPU and it seems to run pretty cool, so you try a bit of overclocking. The GHz climbs higher and higher, it's surely not supposed to be like this? You rush to the internet to share your excitement of hitting the silicon jackpot, and within a few posts, somebody proclaims that you've got yourself a binned chip. But what is it?

    By Nick Evanson on

  • The Best (and Worst) Radeon RX 5600 XT Graphics Cards

    We've have on hand nearly every Radeon RX 5600 XT graphics card model in existence. We've tested them and now we want to share what are the best models, and more importantly, which one you should (and shouldn't) buy.

    By Steven Walton on

  • Valorant Takes Aim at the King

    I've been excited to play Riot's Valorant for a long time, and not just for the sake of the game itself. I'm a long-term Counter-Strike player and my hope with Valorant was not just that Riot would make a game I love, but one that would give another game I love a boot up the backside.

    By Rich Stanton on

  • Anatomy of RAM

    Every single computer has RAM, whether it's embedded into a processor or sitting on a dedicated circuit board plugged into the system, computing devices simply can't work without it. RAM is an astonishing feat of precision engineering, and yet it is manufactured in epic quantities every year. Given how super important RAM is, a proper dissection is called for.

    By Nick Evanson on

  • Blasts From the Past: TechSpot Staff's Favorite Tech of the Last Decade

    We asked everyone on the TechSpot team to think about their top 5 favorite tech items released in the last decade. This article is a collective list of those products (later on you can share your own with the community in the comments), so please join us as we go through our favorite tech from the 2010s: blasts from the past, that impressed us with their value for money, outstanding performance, or those feel-good vibes that they gave us!

    By TechSpot Staff on

  • Network Attached Storage (NAS): What It Is and Why You May Want It

    If you have multiple computers, chances are you've wanted to get a file from one system to another at some point. Maybe you have some files on your phone that you want on your laptop, or media on a PC that you want to stream to a smart TV. Maybe you want a secure location to back up all your important files to. In any of these cases, Network Attached Storage (NAS) is a great option.

    By William Gayde on

  • Benchmarking Your PC: A Guide to Best Practices

    Take the computer know-how, the love of games, and the interest in components, and mix them all together. It's a perfect recipe for diving into benchmarking. In this article, we'll explain how you can use games to benchmark your PC and what you can do to analyze the results.

    By Nick Evanson on

  • Is Virtual Reality Missing Its Moment?

    Many believed VR would take video games to the next level. But even with better games and more impressive hardware, the sobering realization is that VR remains far from widespread adoption. Facebook may have had a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to capitalize on an unfortunate circumstance. Perhaps the situation hit us, but VR in general is simply not there yet.

    By Shawn Knight on

  • How to Replace the Battery in a DualShock 4 Controller

    Sony's DualShock 4 is a really good controller that can double as your full-time PC gamepad as well. If you have an aging DS4, you may have noticed that it does not hold a charge as long as it once did. In this guide, we'll show you how to save over 70% by replacing your DualShock battery yourself.

    By Cal Jeffrey on

  • How 3D Game Rendering Works: Lighting and Shadows

    The vast majority of visual effects you see in games today depend on the clever use of lighting and shadows -- without them, games would be dull and lifeless. In this fourth part of our deep look at 3D game rendering, we'll focus on what happens to a 3D world alongside processing vertices and applying textures. It once again involves a lot of math and a sound grasp of the fundamentals of optics.

    By Nick Evanson on

  • Working From Home Effectively: Dos and Don'ts

    We want to help with a few helpful tips for working from home, not only of what you can do, but what you probably shouldn't. Our hope is that we can contribute with ideas that will get you than ready to tackle the challenge.

    By Shawn Knight on

  • 20 Programs to Analyze and Benchmark Your Hardware

    You've just bought a new gaming desktop, or a laptop for the office. Maybe you've upgraded your PC with a new CPU and motherboard. You might be into overclocking. But do you know exactly what you've got? How well is that PC actually working? We've compiled a list of 20 programs that are great for analyzing or benchmarking your devices.

    By Nick Evanson on

  • 25 Years Later: A Brief Analysis of GPU Processing Efficiency

    The first 3D graphics cards appeared 25 years ago and since then their power and complexity have grown at a scale greater than any other microchip found in a PC. In going from one million to billions of transistors, smaller dies, and consuming more power, the capabilities of these behemoths is immeasurably greater, but what can we learn about efficiency?

    By Nick Evanson on

  • TechSpot's Annual Guide to Buying a Used Graphics Card

    If your gaming PC is in desperate need of a GPU upgrade and you want to save as much money as possible, strap yourself in, this is the guide for you. For the past weeks we've been gathering data for about 80 AMD and Nvidia graphics cards. We've tested them all in 3 representative games using 2 quality presets each, and for the sake of our sanity, limited testing to 1080p performance.

    By Steven Walton on

  • Anatomy of a CPU

    The CPU is often called the brains of a computer, and just like the human brain, it consists of several parts that work together to process information. In today's explainer, we'll go over the key elements that make up a CPU and how they all work together to power your computer.

    By William Gayde on

  • Resident Evil 3 Benchmarked

    Resident Evil 3 is a remake of the PlayStation original released back in 1999, with brand new graphics and reimagined gameplay mechanics. But today we won't delve any deeper on that, but check out how the game performs on PC using a variety of GPUs tested at 1080p, 1440p and 4K.

    By Steven Walton on

  • Ryzen 5 3600 vs. 3600X: Which should you buy?

    We were among the first to review the Ryzen 5 3600 and at $200 we found the 6-core, 12-thread processor a crankin' good deal. In short, it murders the 9600K in core-heavy productivity benchmarks and was right there for the gaming tests. But without question the most popular question we received afterwards was: should you buy the Ryzen 5 3600 or the 3600X?

    By Steven Walton on

  • DOOM Eternal Tested on Low-end Graphics Cards

    Doom Eternal keeps receiving praises so we've doubled down on testing by benchmarking 40 GPUs at 1080p using the low quality preset. This works out to be a good guide for gamers who haven't upgraded GPUs in several generations or as a second-hand GPU guide for Doom Eternal.

    By Steven Walton on

  • How ARM Came to Dominate the Mobile Market

    Whenever you think of mobile computing hardware, ARM is likely the first company that comes to mind, or it should be. While historically Intel has been recognized as the leader in chip making, for years ARM slowly carved into a niche that eventually reached an inflection point, where computing devices no longer needed to be faster, but they needed to be more efficient and portable.

    By William Gayde on

  • DOOM Eternal PC Graphics Benchmark

    Doom Eternal is the series' latest demon-killing romp, bringing more weapon variety, a plethora of new demons to face off against, and exciting new environments to explore. Today we're taking 25 graphics cards to see how they perform in Doom Eternal using the latest optimized GPU drivers.

    By Steven Walton on

  • 25 Great Games You Can Play on Laptops and Budget PCs

    We often talk about the latest and greatest graphics cards and playing games at the highest settings, but there are times when that's simply not an option. In times like these, it's nice to have a library of fun games that won't melt our processors. That's why we've compiled this list of 25 great (but less demanding) games we can wholeheartedly recommend.

    By Cal Jeffrey on

  • Anatomy of a Graphics Card

    Almost every desktop PC has one. They have billions of transistors, can use hundreds of watts of power, and can cost over a thousand dollars. They are masterpieces of electronic engineering and generate extremes in product loyalty and disdain... and yet the number of things they normally do can be counted one just one hand. Welcome to the world of graphics cards!

    By Nick Evanson on

  • Threadripper 3990X TRX40 VRM Torture Test feat. Asus ROG Zenith II Extreme Alpha

    Today we're going to perform some AMD TRX40 motherboard VRM thermal testing using the powerful 64-core Threadripper 3990X. To apply load we're using Blender with the system running at stock and overclocked to 3.8 GHz. The typical power draw for this system is around 450 watts, but once overclocked we are hitting as much as 850 watts. Toasty!

    By Steven Walton on

  • 15+ Titles Every PC Gamer Should Own

    There are thousands upon thousands of PC games out there, and hundreds of good ones. However, some have stood out over the years, and cemented themselves as absolute must-haves in their respective genres. These are 15 titles we feel every PC gamer should have in their digital library.

    By Cohen Coberly on

  • Nvidia DLSS in 2020: Stunning Results

    We've been waiting to reexamine Nvidia's Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS) for a long time and after a thorough new investigation we're glad to report that DLSS 2.0 technology works. The upscaling power of the newer AI-driven algorithm is remarkable and gives Nvidia a real weapon for improving performance with virtually no impact to visuals.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • Anatomy of a Storage Drive: Optical Drives

    You don't have to use magnetism or electrical charge to store data. It can be done using light, or more rather, the reflection of it. Okay, if you want to be really specific, it's done using the interference of infrared and visible electromagnetic waves, but let's not worry too much about that!

    By Nick Evanson on

  • Anatomy of a Storage Drive: Solid State Drives

    Just as transistors revolutionized computers, by increasing the speed at which circuits could switch and perform math operations, the use of semiconductor devices in storage devices was aimed at producing the same outcome. Lets dissect SSDs.

    By Nick Evanson on