Google promotes Chromebook repair program for schools

jsilva

Posts: 325   +2
In context: Google claimed many times that Chromebooks are designed as sustainable devices, consuming less energy than similar products and featuring resistant materials to ensure these devices last. Nonetheless, Google believes there's still room to make the ecosystem more sustainable, introducing a Chromebook repair program for schools.

Overall, Chromebooks are more eco-friendly than the competition, consuming up to 46 percent less energy. As they consume less power, their battery life tends to last longer than similar devices. Maybe this is why over 50 million students and teachers use them daily.

Despite that, Google thinks it can still make the Chromebook ecosystem more sustainable, and that begins by launching the Chromebook repair program for schools in the US. The program aims to educate users on how to repair their devices.

Users have been repairing their Chromebooks for a while. Some of these repairs are even covered under warranty, but finding the information needed to do it isn't always easy. So, Google has partnered with Acer and Lenovo to centralize information needed to fix Chromebooks.

Once on the website, users can select a Chromebook model and learn how to repair it. The material includes videos showing how to repair the device, finding the proper tools for the job, getting replacement parts, finding training to repair your device, and giving you system update access if necessary.

Acer is already training schools so they can fix Chromebooks on their own. Various schools including the Jenks Public Schools in Oklahoma have already created their own Chromebook repair programs, with teachers and students working together to repair broken devices. Some of them even have a "Chromebook repair" course.

"Acer designs its Chromebooks for the education market with both durability and ease-of-repair in mind," says James Vick, VP of customer service at Acer Pan America. "On campus repair programs enable students to help their own school by conducting safe and rapid repairs of Chromebooks, while also teaching them a valuable transferable skill that can help them pursue a career in the IT field. Acer supports valuable programs that give students an opportunity for hands-on learning beyond traditional curriculum."

Google has been implementing various measures to achieve its sustainability goals. Besides the Google repair program, the tech giant also wants to include recycled materials in all "Made by Google" products. The tech giant has been carbon neutral since 2007 and reduced its lifetime net carbon footprint to zero in 2019, but it has more ambitious plans of being carbon-free by 2030.

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antiproduct

Posts: 233   +292
For the most part, all you can easily replace is the LCD screen, battery, keyboard, and maybe motherboard. The sad part about the last component is that everything (cpu, memory, wireless adapter, storage) is soldered on the motherboard. So you rip out all that and e-waste it if one of those components fail. I guess it's usually going to be the LCD with kids though.
 

ruddevil

Posts: 30   +50
If Google really wants to reduce e-waste, how about extending the auto-update period of Chrome devices to something like 12 years instead of 6.
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 5,335   +4,980
And how do you repair a Chromebook that has been smashed? Which is what I always want to do to the POS devices when they operate at a snail's pace...
 
If Google really wants to reduce e-waste, how about extending the auto-update period of Chrome devices to something like 12 years instead of 6.

All ChromeOS devices released from 2020 are guaranteed to receive OS update for 8 years, not sure where number 6 comes from since before it was 4.
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 3,364   +5,591
All ChromeOS devices released from 2020 are guaranteed to receive OS update for 8 years, not sure where number 6 comes from since before it was 4.
Well actually it was 5, not 4, unless you had an extended service lifespan device where it could be 7 or 8.

The numbers are all over the place.
For the most part, all you can easily replace is the LCD screen, battery, keyboard, and maybe motherboard. The sad part about the last component is that everything (cpu, memory, wireless adapter, storage) is soldered on the motherboard. So you rip out all that and e-waste it if one of those components fail. I guess it's usually going to be the LCD with kids though.
From professional experience supporting chromebooks in an educational enviroment, a good 70% of your repairs will be screen replacements. Screens that are stabbed, smashed, or sometimes crushed by the weight of books in the kids backpack. The next 28% is going to be keyboards with food, liquid, ece spilled in them.

Batteries honestly dont fail that often. I've only seen a handful that were bulging (we have had FAR more from our dell latitudes, despite having a mere fraction as many laptops) and only now after 5 years are the oldest of our chromebooks showing some units with degregation past 80%.

Motherboard failures are rare, and when they do happen its almost always within the first 1-2 months, and is covered under warranty. Anything that fails past that point we scrap for parts, because it costs more to get a new motherboard for one f these things then it does a new chromebook.

WiFi is only soldered on some models. The educational models, like the lenovo 100e lineup, have socketed wifi modules. Their USB ports on one side are also a daughterboard that can be replaced.
 

antiproduct

Posts: 233   +292
From professional experience supporting chromebooks in an educational enviroment, a good 70% of your repairs will be screen replacements.
Also, forgot to mention power adapters. Kids (and pets) destroy the hell out of power adapters. It'd be AWESOME if power bricks had detachable cables at both ends. It seems that the end that plugs into computers always gets destroyed, but the standardized end that plugs into walls is always fine.