Intel's H410 and B460 chipsets will not support 11th Gen Core "Rocket Lake"

Shawn Knight

Posts: 14,346   +166
Staff member
Bottom line: Intel in a support document has confirmed that motherboards based on entry-level H410 chipsets and mid-tier B460 chipsets will not be compatible with upcoming 11th Gen Intel Core (Rocket Lake) CPUs. Both platforms launched in Q2 2020 and unless something changes, it appears as though they are going to have very short lifespans.

Motherboards running an H470 or Z490 chipset may need a BIOS update in order to boot with a Rocket Lake processor, Intel added.

The chipmaker didn’t explicitly say why H410 and B460 chipsets wouldn’t be compatible with the upcoming CPUs. According to Tom’s Hardware, however, H410 and B460 are based on “a different and older 22nm process node.” To circumvent this, the publication adds, some motherboard makers are resorting to sneaking the H470 chipset onto boards sold as H410 and B460 products.

Examples cited include the Gigabyte H410M DS2V V2 (rev 1.0) and the H410M S2H V2 (rev 1.0). Looking at the name, you’d think these products would feature the H410 chipset but in fact, they utilize the H470.

Intel is expected to launch Rocket Lake desktop chips sometime in the first quarter of 2021. Early listings from some European retailers last month provided a glimpse of Intel's upcoming lineup and what you might expect to pay for them. Intel has also shared some benchmarks from the Core i9-11900K which show it besting AMD chips in some scenarios.

Masthead courtesy Pawarun Chitchirachan

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Edzz1

Posts: 14   +11
Such a shame, I had like 3 builds on lga 775, now it's impossible to "future proof" an Intel system, it's perfect until you see a newer processor, that needs a new board, that needs new ram, AM4 takes it for me, I'm cheap as ****, and reuse my pc parts until they fail, which is harder than you think..
 

Bulllee

Posts: 258   +171
Such a shame, I had like 3 builds on lga 775, now it's impossible to "future proof" an Intel system, it's perfect until you see a newer processor, that needs a new board, that needs new ram, AM4 takes it for me, I'm cheap as ****, and reuse my pc parts until they fail, which is harder than you think..
I reckon the AM4 won the war...last gen chips are flying off the shelves too.
 

flee2020

Posts: 31   +27
Intel is trying to squeeze more profits out of its PCH product. It is trying to push customers to buy the more expensive H470 and Z490 motherboards. This push started with the B365 chipset when it dropped USB 3.2 Gen 2 ports (the B360 had them). It looks like they regretted introducing the B series chipsets because sales of H series chipsets just wasn't up to their expectations.

The AMD B550 is superior to Intel's B and H chipsets in terms of features and the only thing that I don't like about the AMD platform is the lack of stock and high price of their processors. So Intel got my business (I just built an i5-10400 system) because I could not get a R5 3600.

Both Intel and AMD are not executing their business as well as they should. Consumers suffer as a result.
 

Jpe1701

Posts: 86   +84
The chip shortage sucks. I am trying to build a cheap web browsing and school work pc for my sister's family with parts that I have and it is impossible to get a desktop Ryzen apu right now at anything but ludicrous prices. It would almost be cheaper to buy an intel motherboard and CPU than just an am4 apu for the am4 motherboard I have.
 

Irata

Posts: 2,200   +3,799
So I guess that a 10400 + B460 is not such a great budget platform after all.

If there‘s no worthwhile way of upgrading, it‘s not budget friendly.

Not unexpected, sadly but what is amazing is the minimum amount of pushback Intel gets from the press.

There‘s no
Actually, l should be a little more specific here, I think axing support for 400 series boards is a crap move...
statement like when AMD was planning on not supporting Zen 3 on 400 series boards.

 
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Peter Farkas

Posts: 607   +470
Intel is trying to squeeze more profits out of its PCH product. It is trying to push customers to buy the more expensive H470 and Z490 motherboards. This push started with the B365 chipset when it dropped USB 3.2 Gen 2 ports (the B360 had them). It looks like they regretted introducing the B series chipsets because sales of H series chipsets just wasn't up to their expectations.

The AMD B550 is superior to Intel's B and H chipsets in terms of features and the only thing that I don't like about the AMD platform is the lack of stock and high price of their processors. So Intel got my business (I just built an i5-10400 system) because I could not get a R5 3600.

Both Intel and AMD are not executing their business as well as they should. Consumers suffer as a result.
that is exactly why I went with the 10400F too. I couldn't get a 5600x or even a 3600 for a competitive value against the 10400F.
 

Irata

Posts: 2,200   +3,799
The chip shortage sucks. I am trying to build a cheap web browsing and school work pc for my sister's family with parts that I have and it is impossible to get a desktop Ryzen apu right now at anything but ludicrous prices. It would almost be cheaper to buy an intel motherboard and CPU than just an am4 apu for the am4 motherboard I have.

Have you looked at Athlon ? Depends which country you are in, but Amazon.com has one for $99 (3000G). A bit pricey for an entry level APU but since you already have a board that may be one option.

Newegg has a 200GE for $79. APU supply really looks tight in the US, but that should do for a web / office box.

If you are in Europe it‘s a bit easier as AMD APU are still available at decent prices at some retailers but it looks they are starting to sell out, as well.


 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 4,605   +2,567
Such a shame, I had like 3 builds on lga 775, now it's impossible to "future proof" an Intel system, it's perfect until you see a newer processor, that needs a new board, that needs new ram, AM4 takes it for me, I'm cheap as ****, and reuse my pc parts until they fail, which is harder than you think..
Just cause it's new doesn't mean you need it.
"Future proofing" simply means you buy what you can that you feel will last the longest with the least amount of upgrades.

Ex, buying X470 in hopes for Zen 3 support, or buying 32GB in case you need it later. "Future proofing" never means, "until something new comes out".
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 4,605   +2,567
Hasn't that pretty much always been the case? Intel goes through sockets like children go through shoes.
If you built a good Intel system you didn't have to buy a new cpu every time AMD launched a new socket to compete.

Zen 2 wasn't intended for 300 series chipsets, and Zen 3 wasn't intended for 400 series chipsets. Zen 3 and Zen 3+ support stops at 500 series.

So you officially get two gens out of a single AMD chipset. Just like Intel.....
 

RedBlu

Posts: 48   +64
So you officially get two gens out of a single AMD chipset. Just like Intel.....

I've had a B450 since 2018. I went through a 2600, 3600, and now a 5600. I count three gens. Not bad for a socket from 2017, and I expect that 5600 to last me at least a few years too.

I am basing this off memory of the good ol' days of Pentium yesteryear when Intel would release a new socket with every mainstream gen (P I/II/III/IV/Core 2). So, five sockets in maybe 10 years? I only remember AMD's Athlon/XP/64 in the same period.

Admittedly, this might also be due to AMD's marketing and simpler naming schemes: slot A, socket A, socket AM1/2/3/4, etc.. Intel's numbering convention for sockets (and CPUs) just seems to involve Hulk-smashing the numpad.
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 4,605   +2,567
I've had a B450 since 2018. I went through a 2600, 3600, and now a 5600. I count three gens. Not bad for a socket from 2017, and I expect that 5600 to last me at least a few years too.

I am basing this off memory of the good ol' days of Pentium yesteryear when Intel would release a new socket with every mainstream gen (P I/II/III/IV/Core 2). So, five sockets in maybe 10 years? I only remember AMD's Athlon/XP/64 in the same period.

Admittedly, this might also be due to AMD's marketing and simpler naming schemes: slot A, socket A, socket AM1/2/3/4, etc.. Intel's numbering convention for sockets (and CPUs) just seems to involve Hulk-smashing the numpad.
You got Zen 3 on 400 series because of complaints to AMD. AKA you and me got lucky.
So did Zen 2 users on 300 series.
 

Vrmithrax

Posts: 1,598   +667
If you built a good Intel system you didn't have to buy a new cpu every time AMD launched a new socket to compete.

Zen 2 wasn't intended for 300 series chipsets, and Zen 3 wasn't intended for 400 series chipsets. Zen 3 and Zen 3+ support stops at 500 series.

So you officially get two gens out of a single AMD chipset. Just like Intel.....

Intel put out a chipset that was essentially obsoleted in 1 generation, within a year of release. You can't advance at all on that platform.

Like @RedBlu, my AMD motherboard has had a 2600, 3800X, and will soon have a 5xxx series (when I eventually decide what to put on it). That's 3 generations. There is no world where that is "Just like Intel..."
 

Irata

Posts: 2,200   +3,799
If you built a good Intel system you didn't have to buy a new cpu every time AMD launched a new socket to compete.

Zen 2 wasn't intended for 300 series chipsets, and Zen 3 wasn't intended for 400 series chipsets. Zen 3 and Zen 3+ support stops at 500 series.

So you officially get two gens out of a single AMD chipset. Just like Intel.....

You practically get more though - 400 series chipsets give you Zen, Zen+, Zen 2 and Zen 3 support. Same for (some) X570 boards. That‘s four generations already. Officially. Heck, some may even support Bristol Ridge.

The beauty of having multi generation support is it making upgrades more worthwhile.

Upgrading from my 2700x to a 3000 series does not seem like a worthwhile upgrade (even if I get a lower power consumption with better performance), but an upgrade from a 2700x to a 5800x or better definitely seems worthwhile. If I were on a lower end SKU like a 2600, it would be even better.

You got Zen 3 on 400 series because of complaints to AMD. AKA you and me got lucky.
So did Zen 2 users on 300 series.

Who cares why customers got it if we did ? Luck has nothing to do with this.

I much prefer that to being given the finger as a customer. Your mileage obviously differs.
 

RedBlu

Posts: 48   +64
Who cares why customers got it if we did ? Luck has nothing to do with this.

Actually, researching on Wikipedia and apparently the only limitation on older 400 series boards is BIOS memory. Which was solved by ditching BIOS support for older AM4 processors.

If I ask who profits here then AMD does. They get to shift more chipsets and CPUs, so they were just being greedy. But situations reversed and I can't imagine Intel bowing to consumer pressure.
 

Vrmithrax

Posts: 1,598   +667
Actually, researching on Wikipedia and apparently the only limitation on older 400 series boards is BIOS memory. Which was solved by ditching BIOS support for older AM4 processors.

If I ask who profits here then AMD does. They get to shift more chipsets and CPUs, so they were just being greedy. But situations reversed and I can't imagine Intel bowing to consumer pressure.

Yep, that's what I recall of the whole situation as well. It was (ironically) AMD's traditionally long lifespan of sockets and backwards compatibility with older models that was responsible for the early reports that the 400 series boards likely wouldn't support 5000 series processors. It was a memory space issue for the code required in standard BIOS, there wasn't enough room to add in the new processor support. The solution was that a new BIOS version was created that cut the earliest generation processor support out, leaving room to add in the 5000 series code.

So I'm not sure it was a situation of AMD being greedy, it was actually more of a situation of extending the usability of their platforms too much. A problem Intel has never had to deal with.
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 4,605   +2,567
Intel put out a chipset that was essentially obsoleted in 1 generation, within a year of release. You can't advance at all on that platform.

Like @RedBlu, my AMD motherboard has had a 2600, 3800X, and will soon have a 5xxx series (when I eventually decide what to put on it). That's 3 generations. There is no world where that is "Just like Intel..."
For the third time....
Zen 2 wasn't meant for 300 series and Zen 3 wasn't meant for 400 series.

Also, the whole "AMD sockets last longer" IS dumb and ALWAYS will be dumb, because while people were parroting that, current gen AMD CPU's were slower than last GEN Intel for years. So why would you upgrade when your Intel CPU is still as fast or faster than a new AMD two or three years later? And that jump in performance from Zen to Zen+? lol Zen+ to Zen a little better. Zen 2 to Zen 3 now that's a worthy reason to upgrade.

And a beta BIOS isn't an official BIOS whether it works like one or not.
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 4,605   +2,567
You practically get more though - 400 series chipsets give you Zen, Zen+, Zen 2 and Zen 3 support. Same for (some) X570 boards. That‘s four generations already. Officially. Heck, some may even support Bristol Ridge.

The beauty of having multi generation support is it making upgrades more worthwhile.

Upgrading from my 2700x to a 3000 series does not seem like a worthwhile upgrade (even if I get a lower power consumption with better performance), but an upgrade from a 2700x to a 5800x or better definitely seems worthwhile. If I were on a lower end SKU like a 2600, it would be even better.



Who cares why customers got it if we did ? Luck has nothing to do with this.

I much prefer that to being given the finger as a customer. Your mileage obviously differs.
*sigh*
We (yes we, I have X470) only got Zen 2 on 300 series with Beta bios aka not intended by AMD, and Zen 3 on 400 series because of major backlash we all took part in. I bought X470 over X570 because I thought at the time that AM4 and Zen 3 were together as a couple, and since I heard all the bragging about how long AMD sockets last compared to Intel from users and AMD, I couldn't fathom AMD doing a 180.

So, we got lucky. Twice. And X570 support ends at "Zen 3" as stated by an AMD slide.

And an 8th or 9th gen Intel CPU is as fast or faster than a 3900X in games and fast enough compared to a 5600X we can't buy, so cool, we can brag we have a POSSIBLE three generation socket life with AMD if we complain. Yay.....

LOL. So what? Gamers will use a single console for 7 years. And most PC gamers don't upgrade every year, or two years, or even three years. So if you don't get the first board and CPU in the cycle, you don't even get the benefit of any socket longevity.
 
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