Linux 6.0 releases stable branch supporting latest architecture

Daniel Sims

Posts: 670   +27
Staff
Something to look forward to: Users interested in new chip architectures like Raptor Lake, Arc Alchemist, or RDNA 3 will receive expanded Linux support with the release of the OS' latest kernel. Linux 6.0 introduces many other improvements with other important updates coming very soon with 6.1.

Stable Linux kernel 6.0 is now available for most vendors. Usually, a move to a whole new version number signifies fundamental changes, but that isn't how Linux updates work. The OS' lead developer, Linus Torvalds, admits he only called the new version 6.0 because he didn't want to count beyond 5.19.12. Nonetheless, 6.0 includes many changes, including over 15,000 non-merge commits.

Linux 6.0 introduces hardware drivers for Intel's recently unveiled Raptor Lake and upcoming Meteor Lake processors and open-source drivers for the company's new Arc Alchemist GPUs. The latest AMD drivers support Threadripper CPUs, Epyc systems, and the company's upcoming RDNA 3 graphics cards. The new kernel also starts early support for Qualcomm Snapdragon-powered laptops, charting a path for Linux's expansion into Arm.

Other changes include:

  • Fixed drivers for the Chinese LoongArch processor architecture.
  • A new V3d graphics driver for the Raspberry Pi 4.
  • More extensions for RISC-V platforms.
  • Stable H.265 and HEVC codecs.
  • An MMC onboard storage driver for Rockchip RK3588 devices.

The new kernel also fixes a problem caused by an ancient Linux workaround that slows down AMD processors. The trick was necessary circa 2002 to deal with incompatibilities in early Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) implementations, but it only slows down modern AMD processors. The fix comes courtesy of a Linux developer at Intel who confirmed the update to Ars Technica.

Torvalds will open the Linux 6.1 merge window this week, which he says includes multiple core changes. One is a security improvement Google engineers worked on for over a year to harden the kernel, closing zero-click Bluetooth vulnerabilities that could allow arbitrary code execution.

Another critical item version 6.1 addresses is support for the memory-safe Rust programing language. Google has pushed for Rust's inclusion in Linux since the company uses it to develop its Linux-based Android OS. Torvalds admits Rust initially won't have a "serious use case" in Linux, but 6.1 still establishes a vital beachhead for the programming language on which to expand.

Permalink to story.

 

dangh

Posts: 786   +1,331
I have recently moved to Linux as main system ("this is too much" moment came after 'Hello' was constantly asking me to add my CC to its service even if I was using Chrome, and I had no option to make it stop) and it works extremely well. From gaming to coding to media, nearly everything works out of the box, and stuff which do not work usually are related to my long term windows addiction.
Happy to see more changes coming, and waiting for Rust integration.
 

BobHome

Posts: 162   +66
I have recently moved to Linux as main system ("this is too much" moment came after 'Hello' was constantly asking me to add my CC to its service even if I was using Chrome, and I had no option to make it stop) and it works extremely well. From gaming to coding to media, nearly everything works out of the box, and stuff which do not work usually are related to my long term windows addiction.
Happy to see more changes coming, and waiting for Rust integration.
Did you try running netplwiz? (auto-login)
 

dangh

Posts: 786   +1,331
Did you try running netplwiz? (auto-login)
Eventually I modified grups authorizations and yes, I do auto-login. That's my home pc do that's not much of an issue, but simple pin was handy.
What was actually deeply infuriating, I was not able to say "do not bother me anymore". Every time I was doing any cc operation, I was getting the popup. Many other options in Windows are like that - try to uninstall game bar...
Anyway, the few things still missing in Linux is the 10 bit support, hdr support, and (low resolution Netflix - actually, netflix is full HD, but Disney and PRime are not...)... But it is good enough to make Windows secondary os for me. Sure, there is some hassle (re-check of all my pictures and other similar stuff) but I have feeling that I'm back in control, which is nice ;)
 
Last edited:

mrSister

Posts: 78   +102
"The OS' lead developer, Linus Torvalds"

Sorry, but this needs immediate correction. Linus Torvalds develops a kernel: the Linux kernel. Then that kernel might be used at the core of actual operative systems like Android, GNU/Linux or whatever is running inside of your coffee maker.
 

ZedRM

Posts: 1,342   +943
Linus Torvalds develops a kernel: the Linux kernel.
That's right. The kernel upon which EVERYTHING else is built. Without the kernel, the OS doesn't exist. So your claim that the statement "The OS' lead developer, Linus Torvalds" needs correction is just silly.
 

mrSister

Posts: 78   +102
That's right. The kernel upon which EVERYTHING else is built. Without the kernel, the OS doesn't exist. So your claim that the statement "The OS' lead developer, Linus Torvalds" needs correction is just silly.
Sorry but is not. Linux is a kernel, not an operative system and therefore Linus develops no operative system.
 

ZedRM

Posts: 1,342   +943
Sorry but is not. Linux is a kernel, not an operative system and therefore Linus develops no operative system.
It would seem your ability to understand context needs improvement. So let's try again.

Without a kernel, an OS can NOT function. Therefore, without the Linux Kernel, various distributions of Linux can not function and are not an OS. This means that any OS based on the Linux Kernel is a Linux based OS.

As such, Linus IS an OS developer because he provides the very core of EVERY Linux based OS.
 

mrSister

Posts: 78   +102
It would seem your ability to understand context needs improvement. So let's try again.

Without a kernel, an OS can NOT function. Therefore, without the Linux Kernel, various distributions of Linux can not function and are not an OS. This means that any OS based on the Linux Kernel is a Linux based OS.

As such, Linus IS an OS developer because he provides the very core of EVERY Linux based OS.
Whatever dude. You want to call Linus an OS developer because he provides a piece needed to build a complete operative system? Fine, but he is just a kernel developer.
 

erickmendes

Posts: 703   +333
I have recently moved to Linux as main system ("this is too much" moment came after 'Hello' was constantly asking me to add my CC to its service even if I was using Chrome, and I had no option to make it stop) and it works extremely well. From gaming to coding to media, nearly everything works out of the box, and stuff which do not work usually are related to my long term windows addiction.
Happy to see more changes coming, and waiting for Rust integration.

Could you tell me more about gaming on Linux? I've tried it many times among the years, but seems like there's always a performance overhead when comparing to Windows. You use Wine?
 

dangh

Posts: 786   +1,331
Could you tell me more about gaming on Linux? I've tried it many times among the years, but seems like there's always a performance overhead when comparing to Windows. You use Wine?
For gaming on linux I use only steam and heroic launcher, because all my games are on steam, or epic, or gog. In general, the whole process is to install steam, allow opening Windows only games, and then you simply install that title and press play - that's it!:)
For heroic launcher it is very similar - you login for your epic/gog account, press download, and press play.
I was trying as well many times in past but it was always too difficult and I had no patience to solve some issues. Now, with recent development and with Valve pushing for steam deck Linux integration, it is a breeze.
As for performance, there is slight overhead obviously, but usually it is not something visible, and sometimes linux is faster. Sure, some games can be quite bad, but everything I played was more or less on pair with Windows performance.
Wine is running probably behind the scenes, but I havent had any need to touch it. There is as well a proton library, but as well I just play the last one. Steam allows you to change proton version in those rare cases the latest one is not performing the best.
I just played Farther Frontier, a nice game by Crate, developers of Grim Dawn, and only issue I had was the starting video not having any picture - just blank screen, after skip it was playing as good as windows version. Solution is to install those drivers and that is the only time I had to do something outside the launcher.
But sure you sometimes will have to learn a bit more about the linux. I'm fine with that, but you need to think abut going to google from time to time. There is a nice linux_gaming group on reddit you might want to check.
good luck!