Upgrading thoughts and advice

tymeracer7

Posts: 9   +4
Tyme says: cpu 3,1300x - 8G Ram 15-15-15-36 - Biostar B350GT6 Racing - Radeon HD 7770 GDDR5-1TB 16Head HD - 10 Pro doesn't meet windows 11 requirements (CPU) I heard NEW 5000 series cpu's , AMD was going to make work with this MB ? should I wait ? or upgrade anything now ? any cost effective ideas ? Thanks
 

AlaskaGuy

Posts: 352   +272
Tyme says: cpu 3,1300x - 8G Ram 15-15-15-36 - Biostar B350GT6 Racing - Radeon HD 7770 GDDR5-1TB 16Head HD - 10 Pro doesn't meet windows 11 requirements (CPU) I heard NEW 5000 series cpu's , AMD was going to make work with this MB ? should I wait ? or upgrade anything now ? any cost effective ideas ? Thanks
What country are you located, what is your budget, what is the primary use(s) for your PC and if it includes gaming what is your monitor resolution.
 
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tymeracer7

Posts: 9   +4
US,modest budget,1920-1080 wife uses computer,lite gaming .....is it worth upgrading some components,,or wait and start anew later on.
 

AlaskaGuy

Posts: 352   +272
US,modest budget,1920-1080 wife uses computer,lite gaming .....is it worth upgrading some components,,or wait and start anew later on.
I'd build now if you have the budget for it. Your current system is considered a bit outdated tbh.
 

8600M GT

Posts: 38   +24
Well, it somewhat depends on why you're thinking of upgrading. Is it just about Windows 11, or is it slow, and if so when is it slow? General use? For the light gaming?

It looks like it should very much be possible to upgrade it, it's just a question of what is making you think of upgrading.

Since you're US based, I'll reference MicroCenter prices/products, as they're generally the best option, often a better price than buying online, and can do the upgrade for you if you'd rather not do it yourself.

You mention a 1 TB hard drive, but no SSD. That's going to be the biggest difference for general responsiveness, it can be night-and-day. Something like this 1 TB Inland Premium SSD appears to be compatible with your system, and would be a humungous boost in responsiveness. At $100, it's a great deal, and you could leave the existing hard drive if more storage would be nice.

According to NotebookCheck, your GPU is about on par with the Ryzen 5 5600G GPU. Thus, if general performance could use a boost but the graphics are okay, the 5600G ($160 at MicroCenter) would be a great option. 6 CPU cores instead of 4, and quite a bit more efficient CPU cores as well, while allowing you to sell the 7770 (netting probably around $35-40 based on eBay pricing) and have a cooler, quieter, less power-hungry PC with much better CPU performance and similar GPU performance at the end.

If the graphics are more of a limiting factor but you want a Windows 11 compatible CPU, the 5600 (non-G) is $150 and is slightly faster for CPU tasks than the 5600G. But Windows 10 is going to be supported until late 2025, so if it's only about Windows 11, there's no need to rush.

Graphics card prices have been falling significantly every month, so you'll likely get a better deal by waiting. But it's no longer as extortionate as it once was. From what I've read, the Radeon 6600 and 6700 series are currently the best bang-for-buck options (although that could change as the summer wears on). You could get a Radeon RX 6600 for $330, which would be about 8 times as fast as your current graphics cards, using the few Notebookcheck benchmarks that have been run on both cards. It'll probably fall below $300 in 1-3 months.

Finally, there's memory. If the computer tends to have a lot of things open at once, it could be running low on RAM fairly frequently. 16 GB of DDR for goes for about $60. Without the speed info (only timings), I couldn't find an exact match, but that's the ballpark cost for standard not-super-fast DDR4. It looks like your motherboard has 4 RAM slots, and it likely has 2 of them full, so adding 16 GB would give you 24 GB total; you may be able to get by with just adding 8 for 16 total. As long as the speed and timings match what you have, it should just work. People will tell you that you should match the brand, but I have three different brands of RAM in my system, all of the same speed/timing, and it runs at the fastest supported speed just fine. So 85% chance it'll run at its fastest supported speeds (versus fallback speeds) for you as well, if you mix-and-match.

Basically, there's a lot of upgradeability left, it's just figuring out what is making it slow. If in doubt and it doesn't have an SSD, definitely do the SSD one first. Beyond that it really depends on the use case.
 

AlaskaGuy

Posts: 352   +272
Well, it somewhat depends on why you're thinking of upgrading. Is it just about Windows 11, or is it slow, and if so when is it slow? General use? For the light gaming?

It looks like it should very much be possible to upgrade it, it's just a question of what is making you think of upgrading.

Since you're US based, I'll reference MicroCenter prices/products, as they're generally the best option, often a better price than buying online, and can do the upgrade for you if you'd rather not do it yourself.

You mention a 1 TB hard drive, but no SSD. That's going to be the biggest difference for general responsiveness, it can be night-and-day. Something like this 1 TB Inland Premium SSD appears to be compatible with your system, and would be a humungous boost in responsiveness. At $100, it's a great deal, and you could leave the existing hard drive if more storage would be nice.

According to NotebookCheck, your GPU is about on par with the Ryzen 5 5600G GPU. Thus, if general performance could use a boost but the graphics are okay, the 5600G ($160 at MicroCenter) would be a great option. 6 CPU cores instead of 4, and quite a bit more efficient CPU cores as well, while allowing you to sell the 7770 (netting probably around $35-40 based on eBay pricing) and have a cooler, quieter, less power-hungry PC with much better CPU performance and similar GPU performance at the end.

If the graphics are more of a limiting factor but you want a Windows 11 compatible CPU, the 5600 (non-G) is $150 and is slightly faster for CPU tasks than the 5600G. But Windows 10 is going to be supported until late 2025, so if it's only about Windows 11, there's no need to rush.

Graphics card prices have been falling significantly every month, so you'll likely get a better deal by waiting. But it's no longer as extortionate as it once was. From what I've read, the Radeon 6600 and 6700 series are currently the best bang-for-buck options (although that could change as the summer wears on). You could get a Radeon RX 6600 for $330, which would be about 8 times as fast as your current graphics cards, using the few Notebookcheck benchmarks that have been run on both cards. It'll probably fall below $300 in 1-3 months.

Finally, there's memory. If the computer tends to have a lot of things open at once, it could be running low on RAM fairly frequently. 16 GB of DDR for goes for about $60. Without the speed info (only timings), I couldn't find an exact match, but that's the ballpark cost for standard not-super-fast DDR4. It looks like your motherboard has 4 RAM slots, and it likely has 2 of them full, so adding 16 GB would give you 24 GB total; you may be able to get by with just adding 8 for 16 total. As long as the speed and timings match what you have, it should just work. People will tell you that you should match the brand, but I have three different brands of RAM in my system, all of the same speed/timing, and it runs at the fastest supported speed just fine. So 85% chance it'll run at its fastest supported speeds (versus fallback speeds) for you as well, if you mix-and-match.

Basically, there's a lot of upgradeability left, it's just figuring out what is making it slow. If in doubt and it doesn't have an SSD, definitely do the SSD one first. Beyond that it really depends on the use case.
Microcenter is walk in only. Less than a dozen US states have a Microcenter.