Your PC may not be able to run Windows 11, download Microsoft's Health Check to find out

ManuelV

Posts: 155   +80
I hope windows 11 is better than the app to verify the compatibility, it keeps the reason why my pc is not compatible for itself.
 

Mr Majestyk

Posts: 858   +758
Well it's pathetic then that if you can't install Windows 11 that you are screwed in a few years as they drop support for Windows 10. Plenty of people have a perfectly fine computer for their needs and could happily continue on 10, but oh no M$ wants to force you onto 11 and if you can't then tough, your SOL or just run an unpatched OS.
 

Experimentongod

Posts: 339   +181
The TPM thing is meant to scare ignorant into buying a new computer. A custom Windows builder noted that after disabling TPM in BIOS, the dev build of w11 ran perfectly fine still. The checks for TPM and Secure Boot are done on installation of Windows, but can be bypassed with a custom installer, and w11 will install and run fine.

That's pretty much all you need to know.

Also, most recent PCs will pass the check just by enabling Intel PTT on the BIOS settings.
 
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pelopidas

Posts: 35   +59
Microsoft lost its way with windows 8 and still has not recovered. I went from fanboy to hostile towards them.
The next computer I will buy will be a Mac with a faster processor than either Intel or AMD, a beautiful UI and a problem free OS upgrade path.
Microsoft does not know what it is or who it serves. It had a perfect OS with 7. Built on and refined since 95. Every PC user since 95 could see the design progression and every iteration was more or less an improvement .. until 8. WTF? I understand that Microsoft had IPad envy but WTF? Now my PC has to be this ugly *** gimped disaster of someone’s insecurity at Microsoft? Now based on what 11 looks like we have Mac Envy because there is literally no reason to use a PC anymore for anything but gaming and I can do that on 10 just fine.
I’ll keep this current pc for games but my next “everything else” computer will be a Mac
 

mAdmAnDingo

Posts: 87   +76
The list of Windows 11 supported CPU's are Intel 8 gen and up, AMD 3rd gen Ryzen and up.
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/wi...supported/windows-11-supported-amd-processors
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/wi...pported/windows-11-supported-intel-processors
My 1st gen Ryzen build is sadly not on that list even though it meet all the requirements with UEFI Secure boot and TPM 2.0 enabled.
Microsoft's PC Health Check app does not help atm
Ryzen 2000 CPUs are in that list of supported AMD CPUs you provided bud, so it looks like Ryzen 2nd gen and up are on MS officially (for the time being) supported AMD CPUs list.

But from what I understand, TPM 2.0 is a "soft" requirement, with TPM 1.2 being the "hard" requirement for Win11. So TPM 1.2 devices should work as well, although they may not work correctly and/or opperate with the full functionality when compared to TPM 2.0, and are not supported by MS in the same manner as TPM 2.0, something to that affect.

But let's wait and see with the actual Win11 release, there will be plenty of people testing different TPM versions I am sure, and we will find out then. And I am sure people will find a way to bypass it anyway, they always do (unless MS decide to completely lock in the TPM requirement on an OS level of some sort), so let us wait and see what happens with the final W11 release I think, not too long of a wait bud.
 
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netman

Posts: 674   +267
The problem is MS Health Check only works in Windows 10, Not other versions...! Is there a utility tool to check to see which version of TPM you have on your machine? I used Aida64 but could not find anything...!
 

mAdmAnDingo

Posts: 87   +76
You can bring up the run command bud, by pushing "windows key+r", then type in "tpm.msc". That will bring up the "Trusted Platform Module" management panel. That will tell you what TPM version you have, but only if it is activated.

But if you have a TPM module (hardware or firmware), but it is not enabled in the BIOS, then I think it will just report you don't have one (because it isn't enabled). But I could be wrong about this one, I cant quite remember exactly, I am getting old. So it might still tell you if you have one, even if it is disabled, which means you just need to enable it in the BIOS.

But if you dont see it there all, then you will need to go in the BIOS and double check there to see if you have TPM.
 
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mAdmAnDingo

Posts: 87   +76
The problem is MS Health Check only works in Windows 10, Not other versions...! Is there a utility tool to check to see which version of TPM you have on your machine? I used Aida64 but could not find anything...!
What PC platform are you running bud? Intel 8th gen or newer? Or Ryzen 2nd gen or newer? Or is your platform older than both of those?
 

netman

Posts: 674   +267
What PC platform are you running bud? Intel 8th gen or newer? Or Ryzen 2nd gen or newer? Or is your platform older than both of those?
Older...! Inter 4th Gen i7-4770S. I already have TPM... I just want to check its version...
 

netman

Posts: 674   +267
You can bring up the run command bud, by pushing "windows key+r", then type in "tpm.msc". That will bring up the "Trusted Platform Module" management panel. That will tell you what TPM version you have, but only if it is activated.

But if you have a TPM module (hardware or firmware), but it is not enabled in the BIOS, then I think it will just report you don't have one (because it isn't enabled). But I could be wrong about this one, I cant quite remember exactly, I am getting old. So it might still tell you if you have one, even if it is disabled, which means you just need to enable it in the BIOS.

But if you dont see it there all, then you will need to go in the BIOS and double check there to see if you have TPM.
Thanks for the tip.... I used tpm.msc command and my specs version is 1.2 manufactured by ATML (v37.19)... I still may be able to update my Windows 10 OS which is residing on a separate partition to Windows 11. My daily OS is Windows 8.1 Pro...!
 

Mugsy

Posts: 736   +172
I have a X570 MoBo and Ryzen 3 processor, but I installed my copy of Win10 before I upgraded my PC on much older hardware.

When I run the tool, it declares my PC is "6 years old" and "will not run Win11."

Not a particularly intelligent bit of software MS. SMH.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 17,374   +6,125
IMO, The UEFI bios requirement will kill the possibility of Windohs 11 on a large number of PCs. I guess M$ must have an agreement with hardware manufacturers. :rolleyes:
My two "newest" Gigabyte mobos both have UEFI Bios. One is Z77, the other Z170.. The Z170 made it soooo very easy to install Windows 7, due to the USB 3.0 drivers built into it.

Hey, the Gen Z "USB stick kiddies couldn't do it, I'n still extremely thankful I had a copy of Windows 7 Pro DVD laying around..

Hint, you also needed one of those hopelessly obsolete optical drives to pull it off.;:p

Although, I do feel like a red headed stepchild, having a measly 4 core with no HT, i5-6600K CPU.

The outrage you've all apparently missed, is how manufacturers have gone so far out of their way to engineer planned obsolescence, while simultaneously elevating buyers lust to an almost sexual frenzy.

In fact, they've done such a great job of it, that now they can'r deliver the chips to meet the mating frenzy.

What should we call that? Wait, I know, "computus interruptus". :dizzy::rolleyes:
 
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mAdmAnDingo

Posts: 87   +76
I have a X570 MoBo and Ryzen 3 processor, but I installed my copy of Win10 before I upgraded my PC on much older hardware.

When I run the tool, it declares my PC is "6 years old" and "will not run Win11."

Not a particularly intelligent bit of software MS. SMH.
You mean MS downloadable W11 compatibility checker tool? Yip, it wasn't great, and MS even pulled their tool because of its issues, but there are other free 3rd party tools you can get now to check, but I haven't tried those as of yet. I stick to TPM.MSC to check if a PC has TPM, and if so, what version. But the majority of average users wont know about it, understandably.

And I also have two X570 PC's, one with an 3700X, the other an 5950X, but both passed the W11 comparability tool before it was pulled (which was expected, both had W10 from the get go, and also had all the requirements enabled in their BIOS/UEFI prior to W11 being announced, so both secure boot and TPM), but, I have seen many users complaining about MS checker tool falsely declaring their PC's incompatible when they in fact were, which was one of the reasons MS pulled the tool (the other was the tools vagueness in stating exactly what was the reason for the incompatibility), so I am not surprised to hear of your issues.

TPM.MSC will at least tell you about your TPM, but it won't tell a user if they have secure boot or UEFI (although they should have these, but secure boot might not actually be enabled in the BIOS/UEFI), which W11 compatibility tool was also meant to check, so it adds another step for the user to check for actual W11 compatibility. But from what I understand, MS is going to continue to enforce strict W11 requirements, so we will have to wait and see if that changes.
 
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Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,800   +2,152
TechSpot Elite
"Microsoft starting phasing out 32-bit versions of Windows 10 beginning with the May 2020 update last year and began supplying OEMs with 64-bit versions of its operating system."
I don't understand this at all. Why would MS make a 32-bit version of Windows when the first AMD64 CPU was released almost eighteen years ago? One would be hard-pressed in this day and age to find someone with a single-core CPU, let alone one that is only 32-bit.

The fact that W11 requires a dual-core CPU and at least a 720p 9" display kinda makes me scratch my head because who doesn't have at least that? In any case, it doesn't really matter because I think that this is a good thing. Microsoft is preventing a lot of fools who would otherwise be early adopters, something that you NEVER want to be, especially with Microsoft products.

Need I remind everyone about....
 
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