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Can anyone using Intel’s flawed Sandy Bridge chipset?

By robertq
Feb 16, 2011
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  1. Hi,

    I ended up with NEW Dell’s XPS 8300 system with the flawed Intel’s Cougar Point chipset.

    Intel says only 5% of the motherboards would be affected.

    My question is, how do I know if I am in that 5% or not ?

    Are there any tests or software that would identify the issue ?

    What should I be looking for ?

    I am in stock market business & any errors in calculations & plotting of chart’s data could cost me dearly.

    So I am not using this system for business at this moment but I do need the system.

    I tried hard but Dell’s technicians have no clue.

    Hi,

    I ended up with NEW Dell’s XPS 8300 system with the flawed Intel’s Cougar Point chipset.

    Intel says only 5% of the motherboards would be affected.

    My question is, how do I know if I am in that 5% or not ?

    Are there any tests or software that would identify the issue ?

    What should I be looking for ?

    I am in stock market business & any errors in calculations & plotting of chart’s data could cost me dearly.

    So I am not using this system for business at this moment but I do need the system.

    I tried hard but Dell’s technicians have no clue.

    I have an option to return the system but then I will have to wait till end of April or May to get a new one & would rather keep it if there is a workaround.

    Any help would be highly appreciated.

    Thanks


    Any help would be highly appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. Arris

    Arris TS Evangelist Posts: 4,606   +287

    The only effect the flaw has is that the performance of the Sata 3Gb connections (for Hard disk, optical drive etc.) degrades overtime(i.e the data transfer rate will most likely be less than its specified speed) due to a substandard transistor in the silicon of the chipset. There is no flaw in the Intel CPU which is what would cause any calculation errors, and no errors when reading the data from the hard disk. The short term workaround is to use the Sata 6Gb connections(on my system they are coloured grey while the other intel controlled connections on my motherboard are blue, consult your manual to identify the ones on your system) or if your motherboard supports other non Intel Chipset controlled Sata connections(can be seen in the BIOS where you may have the option to enabled disable "Other devices") connect your HD/Optical drive/other storage to those.

    For example for my motherboard :
    I've contacted my motherboard manufacturer who say they'll replace my motherboard in April. I'm guessing once there is enough supply of replacements Dell will most likely replace yours too. And as to the "only 5% will be affected", I read this as "only 5% of users will be using the Sata 3Gb connections as well as the 6Gb ones". The technical information suggests that ALL Sandy bridge based systems sold will have this flaw. If you want to be sure there is no problem whatsoever then you can open the computer and move any connections to the Sata 6Gb connections (which are backwards compatible with Sata 3Gb devices). This will allow you to use the system without any issues until a replacement is organised through your supplier.
     
  3. robertq

    robertq TS Rookie Topic Starter Posts: 95

    Thank You Guys so much.

    Really appreciate your Help.
     

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