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Get Ubuntu online or uninstall it

By circusboy01
Dec 20, 2010
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  1. I installed Ubuntu using the cd that the instructions told me to create.My problem is I can't get it to go on line. I tried using the cd that came with my wireless usb adapter.But the instructions don't come up like they did on windows7.
    There is a form to fill out where I have a choice between wireless vpn or dsl I have no idea what vpn I have Verizon wireless dsl on my computer now so I'm confused do I choose wireless or dsl? I guess it's a moot point anyway.I tried all 3 and I get spaces to fill in.But I don't know what to put in them.If this question is too long I apologize.I just trying to explain the problem the best I can O.K. on to the next part .In case I'm too dumb and can't follow instructions for getting on line.Then I'm going to want to uninstall it.How do I do That?
    Yikes. I just thought. What if I'm too dumb to do either:D
     
  2. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    Its unlikely your wireless USB adapter is going to work. Unless the CD has linux drivers, its unlikely to work. My suggestion is to go to your USB wirless devices support page online, and see if it offers Linux drivers.

    However, your ethernet port should be working from the get go with Ubuntu.

    Un-installing Linux can be easy, or very difficult, depending on how its been setup. If you wiped over Windows, and have only Linux, all you need to do is insert your Windows CD and then install Windows, formatting your hard disk along the way.

    If you installed it alongside Windows, your going to need to remove the Linux partitions (which can be done in Disk Management in Windows), and then reboot the computer with the Windows Setup CD and then boot to recovery mode, and rebuild the MBR.. Which usually takes several attempts.
     
  3. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11

    Thank you for replying Leeky.
    You'll find out real soon that I'm one of those that you have to duimb things down for,and now is no exception. How do I find my USB wireless device support page?
    How do I find out if my ethernet port is working,and if it is how do I go about using it to get on line? Thanks CB
     
  4. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    What is the make and model of your USB wireless stick?

    To get online, simply connect the ethernet port of your computer to the ethernet port of your router/switch using a ethernet cable. It will self configure, and almost immediately work.
     
  5. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11

    Netgear wireless-N 150 USB Adapter. WNA1100 Other info too smnall to tell if it's letters or numbers.
    My computer is in my bedroom . The router is in the living room.On the oppisite end of the mobile home.So running a wire is not an option.
    If I get online it will hsve to be wireless. Thanks again for your help. CB
     
  6. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

  7. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11

    you know what.I appresciate you trying to help me get Ubuntu on line But I just don't want to go to the trouble at this time. Sorry for taking up yours.
    Can we start working on uninstall instead? I found Partitions in disk manager. Have no clue what to do with it.
    Windows set up CD? Is that the 3 restore cds I had to create? Thanks CB
     
  8. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    Thats absolutely fine, I think under the circumstances its the best choice in my honest opinion.

    If you have the restore CDs, and you don't mind using them, the easiest method by far (though it is the longest) is to just do a fresh install of Windows, formatting the hard disks along the way. If you have a 3 disk set it'll be manufacturer style burned from the image in the recovery partition, and will do the work for you. :)

    Obviously, ensure you backup to media anything you do not wish to lose document/picture wise, because the above procedure is destructive and you will lose everything not backed up separately.
     
  9. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11

    Are you saying you don't think I'm computer savvy enough for Ububtu?
    I think you're probably right. CB
     
  10. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    No, not at all, anybody can learn to use it, but the experience is somewhat destroyed when you can't even get it online in my honest opinion. You'll rely on google and the ubuntu forums for your first few months, so having an active internet connection is a must.

    On another note, a internal Wireless card will be pretty much guaranteed to work with Ubuntu and other Linux distros, so maybe something in the future to consider?
     
  11. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11

    I was just kidding about you thinking I wasn't savvy enough for Ubuntu. I would have used a smily face. But. None were available.
    actually I can use Ubuntu without being on the internet.I can play solitaire.< picture a smily face here.

    So I would get windows by using my USB wireless adapter,like I do now.and Ubuntu by using the internal wireless card. Right? Do Pcs ever come with internal wireless cards? or do you always have to buy them? Thanks for your help and patience. CB
     
     
  12. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    You can get new build computers with wireless built into the computer, but upgrading it is simple enough, its only the case of undoing and then re-doing up 3 screws. (two to remove the case side, 1 to remove the slot blank, and then screw down the mounting of the card to the case frame).

    Then you just insert the disk in Windows to install the drivers, and in Linux most of the time you just see it appear. :D

    You'd be able to use the wireless card as your means for wireless with both operating systems. Its also a more preferred method of connecting by wireless, rather than to Wireless through USB.
     
  13. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11

    Thanks Leeky. One more question.For now that is:haha:( Hey there was smilys available after all. When I get a wireless card Will I be able to get on line with the version of Ubuntu I have now,or will I have to install it all over? CB
    I'm off to price wireless cards.Any brand recomendations .
     
  14. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    You should be fine with the install you have now, you'll probably have to just enable restricted drivers, which could be slight ball-ache if you have no current internet connection.

    It should "see" the wireless card no problems once installed though.

    Assuming your in the US, these would be good options, you want one with an external aerial if possible, as the antenna's can get somewhat lost when the case is up against the wall.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833315041
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833114031

    Both items have an external aerial which can be positioned in order to give the best signal.

    If your in the UK, I recommend the following:

    http://www.ebuyer.com/product/220221

    All should work fine with Linux. :)
     
  15. So it's not possible for you to get up and running on a wired connection first and then sort out your wireless issues?

    Most mainstream wireless g/n chipsets from intel, broadcom, atheros, ralink/realtek, etc are supported natively, for those odd few that aren't the windows driver can usually be loaded up under ndiswrapper.

    Or are you referring to a wireless 3g dongle?

    -Edit: Ok I've read the thread properly now. Install everything over the wired connection and then get your wireless working using ndiswrapper.
     
  16. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11



    Hey Leeky thinks for sending the links. I thought wireless cards were a lot more expensive. I'm in the U.S. (California.)
     
  17. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11


    Hey Caravel; I know this post is meant for Leeky. I just wanted to mention. If I want to hook up to a wire.I would either have to use a wire as long as the full,interior,length of a 3 bedroom trailer. Or Carry my computer, monitor,keyboard and mouse into the living room. Curious. Whats a ndiswrapper,and a 3g dongle?
    CB
     
  18. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    Ndiswrapper enables you to use Windows Wireless drivers (the .inf files I believe) to setup wireless to work in Linux. This is an option thats viable for those without dedicated Linux wireless drivers.

    A 3G Dongle is the type used by mobile providers, and is essentially a modem that enables you to connect to the phone networks at 3G/HSUDPA or whatever it is.

    If you prepared to purchase the cable, and then run it across your trailer, there is no reason you can't have a ethernet connection. The length isn't an issue, its just laying the cable that is. Its time consuming, but much better than Wireless as you have no signal issues to worry about. Every PC and nearly every run in our house has its own ethernet cable, it took hours to run them when we moved in, but was well worth it. :)

    P.S. The post was meant for you, not me.
     
  19. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11


    Not really worried about the quality of reception I'd get with a long cable. It's the hassle of trying to hide it under the edge of the rug,going up and over doorways stuff like that. You know the stuff that you had the patience to do.

    I figured with Technical words like NDiswrapper and 3D Dongle. The post couldn't
    have been for me.:D

    Probably a dumb question.Because. I think I know the answer already. I have a 500 Gig Hard Drive. Whatever part of it that I use for Ubuntu takes away from what I use for windows. Right? Like 250-250 or 400-100 Thanks again CB
     
  20. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    If it was me, I'd doing the following with your hard disk:

    250GB partition for Windows
    10GB partition for / (linux)
    15GB partition for /usr (linux)
    20GB partition for /home (linux)
    2x your RAM (max of 5GB) as SWAP (linux)
    Remainder for media, formatted as NTFS usable in both Windows and Linux.

    Having separate /usr and /home will mean your settings and personal files, including installed programs will always be available when you upgrade or change distro, as the only partition you format is /.

    I currently have 3 hard disks, and my setup is the following:

    1x 256GB Crucial SSD - Windows 7 Pro 64bit
    1x 1TB Seagate disk - Media (my documents etc)
    1x 500GB Hitachi disk, with the following for linux:

    10GB /
    25GB /usr
    15GB /opt
    7.5GB /srv
    7.5GB /var
    20GB /tmp
    7.5GB SWAP
    Remainder as /home.

    You can get away with using as little as 10-20GB for just /, which will then include the entire filesystem within that one partition, or you can separate it out like I have, which then gives you the ability to retain data during upgrades and changes to other distros.
     
  21. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11


    Thanks Leeky; That was as clear as mud. to someone like me:haha::confused::)
     
  22. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    What part doesn't make sense (your queue to say all of it) :haha:
     
  23. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11

    I guess clear as mud was kind of unfair.. I apologize for that.wasn't trying to be rude..Just funny.I try to inject a little bit of humor in a lot of my posts.Sometimes I succeed.Sometimes I don't.
    Actually I did get the gist of what you were saying.I asked about the seperation of my hard disk ,between Windows and Ubuntu. you took the time and effort to explain in detail,examples of how harddisks can be configured.Some of the terms I didn't really understand. Or at least not fully. I doubt if I'm ever going to do anything except divide my harddisk between Windows and Ubuntu.Unless there's more to it than that.
    Right now,I'm just making up my mind about removing Ubuntu from my computer. Or. getting one of the wireless cards you showed me. I'm leaning towards getting a card.
    Maybe you could explain to me some of the reason that some install Ubuntu.Instead of just sticking with Windows. More secure? Less prone to viruses?.Faster? I tried to install it,mostly out of curiosity,and because my Nephew in law.Who seems to know about everything there is to know about computers.He worked at Hewlett Packard for years,and has been building his own computers for even longer. Really likes it.
    As usual. Thanks CB.
     
  24. Leeky

    Leeky TS Evangelist Posts: 4,378   +98

    No need to apologise, I noted the humour, and was injecting some of my own. :D

    Just splitting the size difference leaves for a lot of wasted capacity in Linux, which could be used in Windows (which definitely uses considerably more storage than Linux).

    This method (quoted from my previous posts) will give the least wastage of your hard disk capacity:

    250GB partition for Windows - This will be your Windows C: drive.
    10GB partition for / (linux) - This is the Linux root filesystem (think of it as Linux c: drive)
    15GB partition for /usr (linux) - This is Linux user filesystem (think of it as MyPrograms but in Linux
    20GB partition for /home (linux) - This is your home folder (think of it as MyDocuments but in Linux.
    2x your RAM (max of 5GB) as SWAP (linux) - This is for Linux virtual RAM, should physical RAM run out.
    Remainder for media, formatted as NTFS usable in both Windows and Linux - this is for data and documents you would like to use between both operating systems.

    Some reasons where Linux (of which Ubuntu is), is better than Windows:

    1. Linux does not suffer with virus* issues, spyware or malware, so in that respect is very secure.
    2. It is considerably faster than most versions of Windows running on the same hardware.
    3. It is very secure, if configured correctly.
    4. It is reliable, and unlikely to crash (but I would say the same of Windows 7 too).
    5. Loads of open source applications (my software manager currently lists over 25,000), and thats just the loaded software repositories, more are available online.
    6. Upgrades are easily (and every 6 months if you like), and totally free in the case of Ubuntu.
    7. No need to defrag your hard disks, due to Linux using different filesystems.
    8. It is considerably faster to install, update and then use. All core software packages are installed during setup, and the computer is usable once complete. So none of this install Service Pack, after installing a million updates rubbish before its safe to use.
    9. Everything is updated in Linux (Ubuntu) using just one update manager.

    *Linux can be infected by virus', but AV protection will stop it, but I believe very few are recognised and in the wild.
     
  25. circusboy01

    circusboy01 TS Enthusiast Topic Starter Posts: 829   +11


    Man. Leeky. You really take the time and effort to answer a persons questions. I,very much appreaciate that..
    Heres how much I don't know. I thought you had a choice between Windows Mac and Linux. Linux being the least popular.
    When I get the wireless card installed.I'll be asking you to help me with all of the partitions..Umbutu sound really good.Heck.After I use it awhile I might want to stop using windows altogether..

    *]Linux does not suffer with virus* issues, spyware or malware, so in that respect is very secure.

    Linux can be infected by virus', but AV protection will stop it, but I believe very few are recognised and in the wild.[/QUOTE]

    These two statements seem to kind of cotradict each other.
    What do you mean by recognised and in the wild?

    Can you send e-mails between windows ,like gmail and yahoo e-mail, and Ubunto
    Or should I be saying between Windows and Linux?
    I have all my music on a flashdrive. Over 2000 songs.will I be able to upload them onto Ubuntu?
    Thanks again for your efforts to help. I'm sure there are questions I forgot to ask

    Oh. Here's one. Would the same anti viruses used to protect Windows,be used to protect Linux? CB
     


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