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OC guide request

By Trillionsin
Mar 25, 2011
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  1. I've found a few OC guides out there... but can anyone suggest one they they have personally read through and used, and makes the most sense? I've read a couple, just to be extremely confused and afraid to change certain settings and voltages.

    Related hardware is:

    ASUS P6T Deluxe V2
    Intel Core i7 950

    I am currently running this at 4.2GHz with ASUS AUTO settings for everything, but I cant seem to get it to raise anymore just by increasing the BCLK.
     
  2. Tmagic650

    Tmagic650 TS Ambassador Posts: 20,942   +167

    There are so many different hardware combinations out there that an OC guide would be impossible to create. There are basic things to do related to either Intel or AMD based systems. I don't do AMD, but with Intel EIST and C1E should be disabled in the bios for overclocking...

    This may be helpful:
    OC TIPS
     
  3. red1776

    red1776 Omnipotent Ruler of the Universe Posts: 5,906   +90

    Hey Trill,
    Remember that if you are using thge "FSB" method of over-clocking, you are over-clocking everything. The memory, north-bridge, SB etc. Think of OC'ing as finding the weakest link. for example if your memory is running faster than it can handle, it will limit your CPU OC. Best thing to do is to run all else at stock speed and raise the CPU clock. after you find its upper limit, then you can raise the DRAM speed etc. can you send a screen shot of your settings? and what you have tried so far?
     
  4. Trillionsin

    Trillionsin TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,097   +43

    I do realize that they are much different, Tmagic. I have a Intel Core i7 950 at home, and I have a Phenom II 955 at work, both which I've built myself and have dabbled in OCing on both.

    On i7 950:
    I had a stable OC going for awhile.. or what I thought was stable... until I started playing the first Crysis, and in the background I was transferring data from one HDD to another via USB. I read that Crysis had some sort of memory leak.... but I only got a blue screen while doing these other activities in the background. I ended up lowering it down and the problem had seemed to go away, even did a test run afterwards. I dont have a very high OC at the moment because of this, but I did have it up near 4.1GHz, seemingly stable until my recent run in with Crysis as I mentioned.... in case you are wondering I had dont Prime95 as well as using AIDA64 stress test. I've run Prime overnight, but also cannot recall at which OC rate.. probably not 4.1. Sorry for my confusion... it's been long enough for me to forget a few things obviously. I almost forgot about this post... I appreciate your guys' response.

    Red, I can post something when I am home. Possibly not tonight... and yes, I had been using the FSB method, I did not realize that everything was overclocked along with that. You can probably help me out quite a bit with this, easily. I feel like I have these nice expensive toys, but no idea how to use them. hahah.

    I am not worried about the AMD processor for now.. this PC is in a HTPC case, with stock cooler and runs hot like it is.
     
  5. Trillionsin

    Trillionsin TS Evangelist Topic Starter Posts: 1,097   +43

    Red, when you do have time to look at these settings, what other information would you like me to post for you? Hardware specs? Anything else?
     
  6. red1776

    red1776 Omnipotent Ruler of the Universe Posts: 5,906   +90


    Yup, all your hardware specs, and the settings you have tried. Also the program you are using (if you are using software)

    If you get a chance give this a read. Its a ;lets say OC'ing theory bit I wrote. If you don't have a OC'ing software program, find one you like to test things out before making things semi permanent. This will explain why.

    http://forums.overclockersclub.com/index.php?showtopic=182924&view=findpost&p=1909148
     
  7. dividebyzero

    dividebyzero trainee n00b Posts: 4,913   +718

    What are your OC parameters?
    You mention you had a 4.2G OC. That can be arrived at by stock multi (x23) and a BCLK of 183 , or the preferred method of lowering the multiplier to 21 with a BCLK of 200 (preferably with the RAM running at 800 freq. in other words DDR3-1600)

    Auto settings on P6T/P6TD boards are usually only good up to around 3.6-3.8G. Once you head into 4+ you probably need to address the QPI/DRAM Core Voltage* ( ~1.3v in my experience with the P6T boards). Asus first revision boards can get a little flaky with long term stable OC's. As red intimated, QPI increases as a result on raising BCLK, and as the QPI increases in bandwidth speed a voltage bump is almost certainly required for stability
    I wouldn't rely on OC software for X58 chipsets. The software is damn near fullproof for P55/P67 but has a tendancy to add far too much Vcore for overkill on stability with X58....and of course adding more Vcore also ramps up the need for more chipset voltage.
    (* called QPI_VTT w/ Gigabyte/EVGA/DFI boards if you find an OC guide that uses PhoenixAward BIOS nomenclature)
    Your best bet would be to either fill out a BIOS template (posted below) with the settings you already have, or reset to default and work incrementally up after raising the QPI/DRAM (and possibly IOH) voltage to ensure stability. I would also manually set Vcore (1.25-1.3v should be sufficient in most cases). You of course have EIST/Speedstep etc disabled I presume?

    Code:
    P6T Deluxe/P6TD BIOS template
     AI Tweaker
    ****************************
    AI Overclock Tuner: AUTO
    CPU Ratio Setting: AUTO
    Intel (R) SpeedStep TM Tech: ENABLED
    BCLK Frequency: 133
    PCIE Frequency: 100
    DRAM Frequency: AUTO
    UCLK Frequency: AUTO
    QPI Link Data Rate: AUTO
    *******************
    DRAM Timing Control
    *******************
    DRAM CAS Latency: AUTO
    DRAM RAS# to CAS# Delay : AUTO
    DRAM RAS# PRE Time: AUTO
    DRAM RAS# ACT Time: AUTO
    DRAM RAS# to RAS# Delay: AUTO
    DRAM REF Cycle Time: AUTO
    DRAM WRITE Recovery Time: AUTO
    DRAM READ to PRE Time: AUTO
    DRAM FOUR ACT WIN Time: AUTO
    DRAM Back-To-Back CAS# Delay: AUTO
    
    DRAM Timing Mode: AUTO
    DRAM Round Trip Latency on CHA: AUTO
    DRAM Round Trip Latency on CHB: AUTO
    DRAM Round Trip Latency on CHC: AUTO
    
    DRAM WRITE To READ Delay(DD): AUTO
    DRAM WRITE To READ Delay(DR): AUTO
    DRAM WRITE To READ Delay(SR): AUTO
    DRAM READ To WRITE Delay (DD): AUTO
    DRAM READ To WRITE Delay (DR): AUTO
    DRAM READ To WRITE Delay (SR): AUTO
    DRAM READ To READ Delay(DD): AUTO
    DRAM READ To READ Delay(DR): AUTO
    DRAM READ To READ Delay(SR): AUTO
    DRAM WRITE To WRITE Delay(DD): AUTO
    DRAM WRITE To WRITE Delay(DR): AUTO
    DRAM WRITE To WRITE Delay(SR): AUTO
    
    CPU Voltage: AUTO
    CPU PLL Voltage: AUTO
    QPI/DRAM Core Voltage: AUTO
    IOH Voltage: AUTO
    IOH PCIE Voltage: AUTO
    ICH Voltage: AUTO
    ICH PCIE Voltage: AUTO
    DRAM Bus Voltage: AUTO
    DRAM DATA REF Voltage on CHA: AUTO
    DRAM CTRL REF Voltage on CHA: AUTO
    DRAM DATA REF Voltage on CHB: AUTO
    DRAM CTRL REF Voltage on CHB: AUTO
    DRAM DATA REF Voltage on CHC: AUTO
    DRAM CTRL REF Voltage on CHC: AUTO
    
    Load-Line Calibration: AUTO
    CPU Differential Amplitude: AUTO
    CPU Clock Skew: AUTO
    CPU Spread Spectrum: AUTO
    IOH Clock Skew: AUTO
    PCIE Spread Spectrum: AUTO
    
    Advanced/CPU Configuration
    ****************************
    CPU Ratio Setting: AUTO
    C1E Support: Enabled
    Hardware Prefetcher: Enabled
    Adjacent Cache Line Prefetcher: Enabled
    Intel (R) Virtualization Tech: Enabled
    CPU TM Function: Enabled
    Execute Disable Bit: Enabled
    Intel (R) HT Technology: Enabled
    Active Processor Cores: ALL
    A20M: Disabled
    Intel (R) C-State Tech: Enabled
    ****************************
    Express Gate: Disabled
    
    I would also suggest printing off a few copies of the template. Once you have a stable OC -or a number of OC profiles- fill in the values and store them away. If you need to re-input for any reason (usually a BIOS flash which will wipe your profiles and reset to default), the BIOS template settings make resetting the profiles fairly straightforward.
    They also come in handy for comparing settings in different profiles- either for benchmarks or for power consumption/heat generation and the various tradeoffs that come with OCing (and OCing via multiplier or baseclock)
     


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