Microsoft gets another extension on EU antitrust case

By on April 16, 2009, 12:34 PM
EU antitrust regulators have granted Microsoft a one-week extension to respond to charges that the software giant abused its dominant market position by bundling Internet Explorer with Windows. This is the second extension Microsoft has received and gives them time until April 28 to come up with an answer – the original deadline was January 15.

But while the tiny extension gives them some additional breathing room to plot their next move, the courts have also recently granted “interested third-party” standing to the European Committee for Interoperable Systems (ECIS), whose members include Adobe, Corel, IBM, Oracle, RealNetworks, and Sun. Browser makers Mozilla, Opera and Google had previously joined the case, as well, voicing their concern about Microsoft’s practices.

The participation of all these technology heavyweights highlights the rising importance of controlling internet browser technology as more and more services are being accessed through the web. If found guilty of abusing its dominant position, Microsoft could be forced to pay a hefty fine and/or bundle rival browsers with Windows, even while others such as Apple and every Linux distributor are not required to do the same.




User Comments: 5

Got something to say? Post a comment
phantasm66 said:
Man, is this $h1t STILL going ON???? They started bleating on about this like 10 flaming years ago or something.... Does anyone even care any more? I actually thought all this crap was over. So what if they bundled a browser with windows - big deal!!! Its not like you were locked into it.... you could still install any browser you wanted. Its not like you crippled the OS or something by doing so, or locked yourself out of certain internet content, or anything like that. Am I missing something here?! Does anyone even care about this stupid case any more? I wish they would all just drop this.
captain828 said:
IMHO, MS should just stop selling Windows in the EU... let's see EU then.Again, Windows is their software: they made it, they decide what to bundle it with. I would do the same with my OS.Having IE is actually a good thing. Some apps like calling IE.exe directly instead of finding the default web browser, thus we have good compatibility.You can always use the 'Default Programs' manager to restrict IE's actions and can even totally restrict access to IE with the 'Program Access and Computer Defaults' manager.What's next? make them take Calculator out? Paint? Notepad? WordPad? Windows Photo Gallery? Task Manager!?If they really manage to get away with this, then Apple should be screwed big time for not LEGALLY letting other web browsers on the iPhone or, like MS, for bundling Safari in their OS.Another thing I don't like is the attitude of the other browser makers. While I understand it would be in their interest for this to continue, would they like it if someone made them bundle other apps in their app?? I don't think so...[Edited by captain828 on 2009-04-17 02:05:14]
mattfrompa said:
[b]Originally posted by captain828:[/b][quote]IMHO, MS should just stop selling Windows in the EU... let's see EU then.Again, Windows is their software: they made it, they decide what to bundle it with. I would do the same with my OS.Having IE is actually a good thing. Some apps like calling IE.exe directly instead of finding the default web browser, thus we have good compatibility.You can always use the 'Default Programs' manager to restrict IE's actions and can even totally restrict access to IE with the 'Program Access and Computer Defaults' manager.What's next? make them take Calculator out? Paint? Notepad? WordPad? Windows Photo Gallery? Task Manager!?If they really manage to get away with this, then Apple should be screwed big time for not LEGALLY letting other web browsers on the iPhone or, like MS, for bundling Safari in their OS.Another thing I don't like is the attitude of the other browser makers. While I understand it would be in their interest for this to continue, would they like it if someone made them bundle other apps in their app?? I don't think so...[Edited by captain828 on 2009-04-17 02:05:14][/quote]Thank you, I strongly agree.Microsoft has already made it possible to completely remove IE, and the EU shouldn't expect more than that. No modern OS should come without a browser, even if it sucks (like IE). Those browser companies should do their own promotions. I still think the best way for them to reach new customers is to send physical media to stores, and keep them up front at the counters to hand out (or charge a $0.99 fee for convenience)
JDoors said:
The EU should, but won't, drop this. It made little sense when they started, it makes NO sense now. Apparently, according to this legal theory, Michelin should sue automakers for "bundling" other maker's tires. Buy a 'home-theater-in-a-box' and you're stuck with the manufacturer's speakers! Outrageous!Would Firefox be as good as it is if it didn't have to compete as a REPLACEMENT for IE?Unfortunately, we're moving more and more toward a nanny-state "level the playing field" mentality, which will inevitably result in equally mediocre products.
DarkCobra said:
Once again I totally agree with the group. This may well be the ONE issue that everybody is on the same page about. The funny thing is if MS yanked out every single thing that every whining group out there was protesting the only thing they'd be selling at this point would be an empty box . . . and somebody would complain they didn't like the box!
Load all comments...

Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...
Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.