Sony to ship TransferJet chips in January

By on December 1, 2009, 6:35 PM
It seems that Sony is preparing to offer samples of "TransferJet", a short-range wireless transmission technology. TransferJet was demonstrated at this year's Consumer Electronics Show (CES), and could replace Bluetooth as a means of close proximity, high-speed wireless communication, boasting an effective maximum throughput of about 375Mb/s.

Sony will reportedly begin shipping both the "CXD3267AGG" and "CXD3268AGW" chips in January for 1,500 yen each (a bit over $17). If that is true, the company should have a polished demonstration of the technology at the upcoming CES event.


Sony's new technology is destined for use in products like cell phones and digital cameras, and as of August 2009 the TransferJet Consortium consisted of 19 member companies, including Canon, Kodak, Hitachi, Nikon, Panasonic, Pioneer, Samsung, Sharp, Toshiba and others. The consortium is also accepting applications for adopter membership.




User Comments: 42

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Kibaruk Kibaruk, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Nice! After all this time using bluetooth and... "hey! I love that song could you send it please?" and finish it like in 5 minutes, this sort of transfer rates will be amazing! Even for backing up data from PC to PC or notebook, netbook or whatever!

lfg18 said:

Very good news!, bluetooth is kind of slow by today standards, not to say infrared jaja, this technology will make transfers more effective and faster, I cannot wait to see it in action, sony again is the company that introduces new technology to the word, remember walkman?

timljh said:

560Mbps.. amazing speed especially compared to the bluetooth..

Deso said:

Lololol That's faster then my home network (wireless N)

So it's from Bluetooth version 3 with maximun at 24mbit/s

to..... 375 mbit/s ???

That's great lol, finaly not steps that that are like 40 % faster then the previous technology

saintbodhisatva said:

Sony being known for having its own protocol for most of its products....Its good to know that there is a consortium for this that will be adopted by several big-name companies to begin with.

vangrat said:

Unfortuneatly that is Mega bits per second not Mega Bytes per second

1 mbps (megabit per second) = 1,000,000 bits per second

1 MBps (megabyte per second) = 8 mbps (megabits per second)

So probably not faster than your 802.11n network

vangrat said:

to put that in perspective this is a 70MBps wireless technology.

9Nails, TechSpot Paladin, said:

If it is 70 MB (bytes not little bits) then that's faster than most flash memory chips can write! (Which is typically about 12 MB/sec) You gotta love a solution that finds a new problem.

bonboy said:

1 for sure,this is faster than previous bluetooth. when will this technology apply in cellphone?it will boost the transfer speed, we can stream music n video live from other cellphone or pc wirelessly.

klepto12 klepto12, TechSpot Paladin, said:

this is great i hate waiting on bluetooth its so slow takes like 3 min for 1 song to transfer. i think this will be great might can even use it as a lan connection of sorts.

Clrabbit said:

"maximum throughput of about 375Mb/s"

And yet the image says (560Mbs)

Am I only person not seeing consistency here?

Basher said:

Yeah, I saw that too ^^... these are also most likely theoretical maximums, along with the limits of the sender and receiver. I'm interested to see how this turns out though...

WakeMO said:

I dont think TransferJet is going to take off very fast. USB 3.0 is faster and has been around for awhile and yet it never did. but that might be a completely different subject.

Razerblade said:

Wow 375Mb/s! That is such an improvement over Bluetooth! I cannot wait until something like this becomes standard on phones, laptops etc! You will be able to copy files across much faster! It will be quicker than connecting the device to a PC via USB until USB 3.0 is released!

Puiu Puiu said:

I don't want it if it isn't compatible with current bluetooth devices. This is another stupid invention which tries to copy bluetooth. They should just use wireless usb.

BTW Bluetooth 4.0 will use the the same technology that wireless usb uses, both being based on UWB(Ultra-wideband). UWB is capable of 480 Mbit/s at distances up to 3 meters and 110 Mbit/s at up to 10 meters.

ET3D, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I don't see how it could replace bluetooth, considering it's limited to a 3cm distance (1/100 of the bluetooth range).

Regarding the 560 vs 375Mb/s, this has to do with error checking, according to the Wikipedia page.

Richy2k9 said:

hello ...

the only temporary drawback is distance, yet the transfer makes it so cool ... a nice technological evolution.

SONY bringing 3D, rapid transfer wireless connectivity ... thank you!

cheers!

kaonis92 said:

I'm impressed, it's the first time I hear about TransferJet. I'd like to see it on SE mobiles fast!

Serag said:

Amazing..finally something better than BlueTooth that'll replace it shortly..

I hope I see TransferJet on Sony Ericsson mmobiles soon..

drasho said:

hehe this could be nice if they boost the range... =) wouldnt need wireless for streaming movie or music from pc to console ^_^

harby said:

Hmmm whats the max distance for this? Looks very promising indeed.

slh28 slh28, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Let's just hope that this new technology doesn't affect your reproductive organs when you leave it on and put the phone in your pocket

Vrmithrax Vrmithrax, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Great technology in theory, and I'm sure it will be a great feature to add to products, but I don't see it replacing Bluetooth. It really just looks like an extremely fast way to throw large data chunks around, but doesn't look even remotely feasible for things like headsets. So, if anything, mobile platforms will end up with yet another connection option integrated.

I can see it working great for smartphones to sync to PCs, in cameras to dump pics in memory to a computer or printer, sharing data between units... But not much else, really - the distance limits are far too restrictive, it takes too much of the mobility out of mobile platforms.

Kibaruk Kibaruk, TechSpot Paladin, said:

It's just a transfer protocol replacement, so the distances might not be that importart right now, although what left me thinking is the flash memories write/read speed that will set a drawback here.

compdata compdata, TechSpot Paladin, said:

So far i have managed fine without needing bluetooth, so i am sure i will manage just fine without this ;-) Not that it isn't cool though. As several people have mentioned it would have been nice to see something that is backwards compatible with bluetooth. I don't know anything about the bluetooth licensing/patents, but my guess is that Sony is having to pay someone else for using bluetooth and is is trying to push a different standard to avoid this.

Kibaruk Kibaruk, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Wait until next year, when the new wifi protocol comes out that allows device to device connections without the need for a router (Read that news in here a couple weeks ago), then bluetooth will ceise to exist.

Docnoq said:

Honestly, this new technology will not impact me or anyone that I know. I mean, a few of my friends have bluetooth headsets, but other than that, who uses bluetooth? My laptop has, or had since it is now broken, bluetooth, but I never really cared to pair up anything with it. The only time I have ever witnessed bluetooth being used to transfer data was back in high school when it was used to give other kids songs from phone to phone. In short, this new technology is kind of meh.

swilllx2p said:

slh28 said:

Let's just hope that this new technology doesn't affect your reproductive organs when you leave it on and put the phone in your pocket

I lol'd a lil in real life there.

Anyways, seems like good news..huge speed improvement, though honestly I never really used bluetooth to begin with.

Deso said:

vangrat said:

Unfortuneatly that is Mega bits per second not Mega Bytes per second

1 mbps (megabit per second) = 1,000,000 bits per second

1 MBps (megabyte per second) = 8 mbps (megabits per second)

So probably not faster than your 802.11n network

Actually the maximun speed of 802.11n is also measured in BIT's not BYTE's

So you are wrong.

Regular wireless N (NET Throughput) = 50-144 mbit/s using 2 channels

TransferJet technology = 375mbit/s

Normal N stream is 150 mbit/s not mbyte/s

and it's possible to reach by 600 mbit/s(but only get 144 mbit/s throughput) by using 4 channels but that's not

commonly available on routers, the most common is N using 2 channels for 300 mbit/s with around 60mbit/s throughout

BlackIrish said:

But cellphones can't read/write at that speed!

Chazz said:

That's very interesting. It's about time bluetooth was replaced. I hope this is more secure then bluetooth. I look forward to more details.

AbsolutGaloot said:

It's a shame the transfer distance is so short, I'd really like to see something like this in high performance wireless gaming peripherals. So far, you can't beat a wired gaming mouse for response time, especially not with Bluetooth.

Arthurik_jan Arthurik_jan said:

@everyone who thinks this is not much of a useful technology. This is another step (if not forwards then at least sideways) towards a future where wires are not needed anymore. Look at it this way: After a USB 3.0 device is released enabling these phones to communicate with PCs then we can with certainty say goodbye to cables with which we connect our cameras, phones, printers and maybe even monitors to our computers.

That being said, do you remember the article in Tech Generation Daily stating that Intel actually conducted a successful experiment where they wirelessly powered a nearby light bulb with 75% efficiency.

Can you imagine the WORLD of possibilities behind this concept?

Vrmithrax Vrmithrax, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I don't think bluetooth will disappear anytime soon. It is too convenient and universal a protocol for connection. It has taken far longer than many thought it would for bluetooth to become as prevalent as it is today, and the mobile electronics industry has embraced it too thoroughly for that prevalence to disappear for quite some time.

For those who don't use bluetooth much (or at all), there are always balancing individuals who do. For example, I use a bluetooth headset for my cell phone, a bluetooth keyboard/controller for my home theater PC, bluetooth connectrs my Wii controllers, I use a bluetooth mouse while on the road, and a bluetooth GPS module for navigation... Wow, didn't even realize how often I use BT until I started that list. And that doesn't even count on a professional level, with one my company's main products which uses bluetooth to remotely connect our PDA-based controller and measurement devices, as well as bluetooth connections to a mobile printer for output... Glad I'm done having kids, with all this bluetooth radiation floating around me, I must be sterile by now! heh

Decimae said:

I think the theoretical maximum speed is 375 megabyte/s and the already reached speed is 560 megabit/s or 70 megabyte/s. Still, this seems like a nice development, and as some people have said before, a step to a completely wireless future.

Wagan8r Wagan8r said:

That seems interesting, but what phone will need to transfer data at that speed?

ken777 said:

This sounds pretty sweet, but I wish someone would figure how to consolidate some of these different wireless technologies. A laptop already has different radios for wi-fi, bluetooth, and cellular. TransferJet, WiMax, and wireless USB would need even more incompatible radios.

TechDisciple said:

375mb/s thats wat i call Awesomeness!! means more and faster music life to my ears.

buttus said:

Sony is really digging being the creaters of niche formats. Frankly I thought Bluetooth was for the mostpart a useless technology and now Sony has shown it to be as slow and useless as I believe Bluetooth to be.

vangrat said:

Actually the maximun speed of 802.11n is also measured in BIT's not BYTE's

So you are wrong.

Regular wireless N (NET Throughput) = 50-144 mbit/s using 2 channels

TransferJet technology = 375mbit/s

Normal N stream is 150 mbit/s not mbyte/s

and it's possible to reach by 600 mbit/s(but only get 144 mbit/s throughput) by using 4 channels but that's not

commonly available on routers, the most common is N using 2 channels for 300 mbit/s with around 60mbit/s throughout

Damn your right, thanks for pointing that out Deso, that really does make me excited about this then, good stuffs.

Kibaruk Kibaruk, TechSpot Paladin, said:

More than bluetooth replacement, I find this interesting for data backing or transferring huge pieces of data from computer/notebook/cellphone/another computer/etc.

Nowadays everything is heavy, and this sort of things are the revolutionary ones that offer a solution to the "heavy", who cares that it has a 3m range or less, you just press one device to another and voila.

To another point made before, it does make you wonder to what we are going to, cordless power devices, huge data transfering, etc.

Hyperian said:

Pretty cool, now if the chip can go to USB2.0 then you can just buy a TransferJet to USB2.0 dongle and transfer pictures from phone/camera to your computer without wires!

just need to keep the cost down...

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