Samsung develops DDR4 memory, up to 40% more efficient

By on January 4, 2011, 12:18 PM
Samsung Electronics has announced that it completed development of the industry's first DDR4 DRAM module last month, using 30nm class process technology, and provided 1.2V 2GB DDR4 unbuffered dual in-line memory modules (UDIMM) to a controller maker for testing. The new DDR4 DRAM module can achieve data transfer rates of 2.133Gbps at 1.2V, compared to 1.35V and 1.5V DDR3 DRAM at an equivalent 30nm-class process technology, with speeds of up to 1.6Gbps. In a notebook, the DDR4 module reduces power consumption by 40 percent compared to a 1.5V DDR3 module.

The module makes use of Pseudo Open Drain (POD) technology, which allows DDR4 DRAM to consume just half the electric current of DDR3 when reading and writing data. By employing new circuit architecture, Samsung's DDR4 will be able to run at up to 3.2Gbps, compared to today's typical speeds of 1.6Gbps for DDR3 and 800Mbps for DDR2.

Samsung now plans to work closely with a number of server makers to help insure completion of JEDEC standardization of DDR4 technologies in the second half of this year. Samsung developed the industry's first DDR DRAM in 1997, the first DDR2 DRAM in 2001, and the first DDR3 DRAM using 80nm-class technology in 2005.

"Samsung has been actively supporting the IT industry with our green memory initiative by coming up with eco-friendly, innovative memory products providing higher performance and power efficiency every year," Dong Soo Jun, Samsung's president of the memory division, said in a statement. "The new DDR4 DRAM will build even greater confidence in our cutting-edge green memory, particularly when we introduce four-gigabit DDR4-based products using next generation process technology for mainstream application."





User Comments: 33

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Benny26 Benny26, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I aint even got to DDR3 yet!...

There can't be any point in buying anything DDR4. I mean, if it's only going to be a few week before DDR5 comes along, might aswell save money and get that.

[Edit]

Alert! Alert! Alert! This post is not to be taken literally. Failure to heed this warning may result in a social breakdown of communication. Thank you. <--(Smile)

[Edit]

princeton princeton said:

benny26 said:

I aint even got to DDR3 yet!...

There can't be any point in buying anything DDR4. I mean, if it's only going to be a few week before DDR5 comes along, might aswell save money and get that.

What the hell are you talking about? It's been 3 years since DDR3 launched. And it'll be around the same amount for DDR4-DDR5. But you go ahead and keep saying "It'll only be another week" if it makes you feel like it isn't necessary.

On another note. I really wish they let intel know so they could develop DDR4 compatibility for sandy bridge.

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

DDR4 is a ways off yet. afaiw the DDR4 JEDEC spec hasn't been finalised yet.

Nice to see that things are moving in the right direction, although it's early days in the development considering the specification is aiming at DDR4-4266 @ 1.05v.

BTW Nice pic - obviously using the PR method of handling RAM modules.

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

On another note. I really wish they let intel know so they could develop DDR4 compatibility for sandy bridge.

You most likely wont see DDR4 before Rockwell (on 16nm- Ivy Bridge's successor) due to the timeframes involved- Although I don't think there is a great deal that needs to be reworked in hardware (memory controller) between DDR3 and DDR4, although I'm not certain of this particular aspect.

MrAnderson said:

I'm happy for the faster and efficiencies, but Hey! they need to chill with changing things so much as to make our Motherboards obsolete.

Put it in portable laptops, netbooks, and tablets first, where they will be most needed and well, you don't have to think about upgrading ram to find out you cannot use the latest and greatest...

Oh and I guess the Video memory DDR5 is totally different... obviously

princeton princeton said:

MrAnderson said:

I'm happy for the faster and efficiencies, but Hey! they need to chill with changing things so much as to make our Motherboards obsolete.

Put it in portable laptops, netbooks, and tablets first, where they will be most needed and well, you don't have to think about upgrading ram to find out you cannot use the latest and greatest...

Oh and I guess the Video memory DDR5 is totally different... obviously

Yah it's called GDDR5. I never really cared as it was limited by atis memory bus width afaik.

red1776 red1776, Omnipotent Ruler of the Universe, said:

This is all good and fine, but I'm waiting for the new Rambus...:p

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

I'm happy for the faster and efficiencies, but Hey! they need to chill with changing things so much as to make our Motherboards obsolete.

Memory bandwidth is probably the biggest anchor holding back CPU intensive tasks (video encode on Sandy Bridge for example). As the CPU takes on graphics functions, memory bandwidth is probably going to need to scale as the on-die graphics gains more shaders and higher frequencies

Put it in portable laptops, netbooks, and tablets first, where they will be most needed and well, you don't have to think about upgrading ram to find out you cannot use the latest and greatest....

That seems a pretty much spot on assessment of where things are heading. With computing now heading more into the mobile space and the emphasis on jack-of-all-trades/ultra low power consumption CPU's it makes sense to develop a memory standard that uses much less power than the standard now in use and can adequately supply bandwidth to a CPU+GPU (or APU in AMD-speak) combo.

The initial pricing is likely to be higher (to recoup R&D expenses and simply because it's NEW!) and will likely find it's way into the enthusiast hardware first - standard operating procedure for new tech.

Oh and I guess the Video memory DDR5 is totally different... obviously

Yep. GDDR5 is based on DDR3

@red

The XDR revolution !

I can see it now, Rambutt licences the tech to everyone then five years later sues everyone for a hidden feature not included in the original licencing agreement !

Yah it's called GDDR5. I never really cared as it was limited by atis memory bus width afaik.

This would be the same GDDR5 and same 256mb memory bus that the GTX 460 uses?

princeton princeton said:

dividebyzero said:

Yah it's called GDDR5. I never really cared as it was limited by atis memory bus width afaik.

This would be the same GDDR5 and same 256mb memory bus that the GTX 460 uses?

And I still don't care for it on nvidia cards either :P.

red1776 red1776, Omnipotent Ruler of the Universe, said:

@red

The XDR revolution !

I can see it now, Rambutt licences the tech to everyone then five years later sues everyone for a hidden feature not included in the original licencing agreement !

From the article:

"Moore's Law is definitely Rambus' friend,

....They must mean Demi Moore's law, 'don't marry in your own age bracket'

Benny26 Benny26, TechSpot Paladin, said:

What the hell are you talking about? It's been 3 years since DDR3 launched.

Oh i'm sorry, you don't understand sarcasm?.

But you go ahead and keep saying "It'll only be another week" if it makes you feel like it isn't necessary.

Thanks mate, i will

princeton princeton said:

Benny26 said:

What the hell are you talking about? It's been 3 years since DDR3 launched.

Oh i'm sorry, you don't understand sarcasm?.

But you go ahead and keep saying "It'll only be another week" if it makes you feel like it isn't necessary.

Thanks mate, i will

Your comment didn't at all make it clear it was sarcasm. I'm sorry you don't have the capacity to understand that text doesn't have a tone of voice to indicate such a thing. You need icons such as humorous emoticons or other indicators.

Please come back when you learn what sarcasm is and how it works.

Leeky Leeky said:

Out of curiousity, why did we go straight from DDR3 RAM to DDR5, missing out DDR4 in the process, to then only later on release DDR4 RAM.

It doesn't really make numerical sense to me, and since the numbering has increased along with advances in Memory performance DDR, DDR2, DDR3 etc it seems somewhat odd.

Or is it a case of DDR5 is video RAM only, and won't ever be used like traditional memory (e.g. DDR2/3). It somewhat confuses me, as GPUs use DDR2/3/5 RAM as well.

Cota Cota said:

benny26 said:

I aint even got to DDR3 yet!...

There can't be any point in buying anything DDR4. I mean, if it's only going to be a few week before DDR5 comes along, might aswell save money and get that.

The problem is that the past generation of DDR is always stocked on the market, making it slow for the new generation to flow and replace it. However this does not affects the people who always arms their own PC's, but i do agree its annoying to know that my DDR3 is old and slow even if it is 4 months since i switched to my Asus Rampage III.

Leeky Leeky said:

@Cota

I wouldn't even come close to calling DDR3 slow and old - Quite a few people, including me are still using DDR2 800mhz RAM, and haven't even upgraded to DDR3 yet.

I haven't really seen a need to upgrade it yet (though I'm sure it would offer more performance), but that would be in part due to a new CPU etc as well.

I really wouldn't worry about it.

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

They must mean Demi Moore's law, 'don't marry in your own age bracket'

or Michael Moore's Law : "Stick it to the Corporations"

Out of curiousity, why did we go straight from DDR3 RAM to DDR5, missing out DDR4 in the process, to then only later on release DDR4 RAM..

The only "DDR5" is GDDR5 -a graphics memory standard that is based upon DDR3 (see earlier post for the wiki entry link). And just in the interest of completeness there is/was a GDDR4 that was used exclusively on ATI cards (HD 3870, 4670, 2900XT/Pro, X1950XTX -there may be others but not many)

red1776 red1776, Omnipotent Ruler of the Universe, said:

Out of curiousity, why did we go straight from DDR3 RAM to DDR5, missing out DDR4 in the process, to then only later on release DDR4 RAM.

It doesn't really make numerical sense to me, and since the numbering has increased along with advances in Memory performance DDR, DDR2, DDR3 etc it seems somewhat odd.

Or is it a case of DDR5 is video RAM only, and won't ever be used like traditional memory (e.g. DDR2/3). It somewhat confuses me, as GPUs use DDR2/3/5 RAM as well.

Yep, DDR5 is actually GDDR5 and is 'graphics double data rate' and operates differently than the system ram.

@ Chef,

Now see that's why I put Demi in there, I knew you would have one post-haste , so I went for the low hanging fruit

princeton princeton said:

Leeky said:

@Cota

I wouldn't even come close to calling DDR3 slow and old - Quite a few people, including me are still using DDR2 800mhz RAM, and haven't even upgraded to DDR3 yet.

I haven't really seen a need to upgrade it yet (though I'm sure it would offer more performance), but that would be in part due to a new CPU etc as well.

I really wouldn't worry about it.

I want sandy bridge so I'll be forced to get DDR3 :P. Honestly though this 800mhz DDR2 is pissing me off.

Benny26 Benny26, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Your comment didn't at all make it clear it was sarcasm. I'm sorry you don't have the capacity to understand that text doesn't have a tone of voice to indicate such a thing. You need icons such as humorous emoticons or other indicators.

Please come back when you learn what sarcasm is and how it works.

Hey, take another look at my first post (that's #1)...You will notice a on the end. Well in fact you won't notice the actual face because for some reason the smile code wasn't working...

You're coming very brash with things like "Please come back when you learn what sarcasm is and how it works". Manners really will help in life ya'know .

As regards to DDR4...Yeah it sounds good...Sources say 2012 for release. That's enough time for me.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

Your comment didn't at all make it clear it was sarcasm. I'm sorry you don't have the capacity to understand that text doesn't have a tone of voice to indicate such a thing. You need icons such as humorous emoticons or other indicators.

Please come back when you learn what sarcasm is and how it works.

Why? If he gets it right, in all likely hood, you'll be crying about it, and then make a big show of putting him on you're ignore list.

What the hell are you talking about? It's been 3 years since DDR3 launched. And it'll be around the same amount for DDR4-DDR5. But you go ahead and keep saying "It'll only be another week" if it makes you feel like it isn't necessary.
BTW, this is fairly aggressive and rude posting. If you expect people to display manners toward you, perhaps you should take the lead and display it towards them.

I want sandy bridge so I'll be forced to get DDR3 :P. Honestly though this 800mhz DDR2 is pissing me off.
The DDR in my Emachine is honestly sufficient to deal with this forum.

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

Why? If he gets it right, in all likely hood, you'll be crying about it, and then make a big show of putting him on you're ignore list..

You're slipping captain !

The DDR in my Emachine is honestly sufficient to deal with this forum.

Judging by some of the posting going on I'm going to say the Emachine is massive overkill. No reason to go above an Intel 80286- the rest is just uneccessary bling and Emachines performance hype.

Oops sorry , forgot about the

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

@DBZ.....There's the "you're",

Zecias said:

benny26 said:

I aint even got to DDR3 yet!...

There can't be any point in buying anything DDR4. I mean, if it's only going to be a few week before DDR5 comes along, might aswell save money and get that.

a few weeks to come up with ddr5? where did u ever get that idea?... ddr4 isn't even comercially available yet, itll probably be a while before everyone starts using it.

Benny26 Benny26, TechSpot Paladin, said:

a few weeks to come up with ddr5? where did u ever get that idea?... ddr4 isn't even comercially available yet, itll probably be a while before everyone starts using it.

I wasn't being serious Zecias, i was being sarcastic. I'll make an edit to my post.

Cota said:

The problem is that the past generation of DDR is always stocked on the market, making it slow for the new generation to flow and replace it

I agree entirely.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

The problem is that the past generation of DDR is always stocked on the market, making it slow for the new generation to flow and replace it.
In fairness, this has very little truth in it. The best buys right now, are in DDR-3. It doesn't really make sense to compare pricing on the proverbial, "(DDR-4) bird in the bush", as it were.

Supply and demand will work its magic, when in fact, DDR-4 is actually introduced. And for those special few that simply have to be the first kid on their block to have it, then you will have to pay a hefty premium for that privelege. (Oh, and those "select few" will be doing the same bellyaching that they were at the first release price of DDR-3).

When DDR-3 becomes a "replacement part", then the price will go up. This is evidenced by that fact that both DDR, and DDR-2, are now selling at a rate of 150% of DDR-3, and DDR-3 isn't anywhere near EOL at present.

Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

I feel slightly sorry for Benny26. No one took it as sarcasm, I did because he put "I mean," and after that point in the post it becomes a bit more obvious.

Anyway I guess this is a good thing for Laptop and Netbook owners, Although as DBZ mentioned we won't actually see this until around the time Intel enter the 16nm zone.

Out of question incase anyone knows, what is different between GDDR and DDR types of RAM?

As in is the underlying way the RAM works is totally different or is it smaller differences?

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

Out of question incase anyone knows, what is different between GDDR and DDR types of RAM?

As in is the underlying way the RAM works is totally different or is it smaller differences?

Jeez, you know how to ask the sticky questions!

Okay here goes...

All desktop (say DDR3) memory is based on a 64-bit memory bus* (so dual channel = 2 x 64 =128-bit, triple channel = 3 x 64 = 192-bit), GDDR as you probably know generally operates on a considerably wider bus because it utlises (typically) 4 or more channels ( 64 x 4 = 256-bit, 64 x 6 = 384-bit, 64 x 8 = 512-bit) - this allows for a much higher transfer rate (memory bandwidth), which leads to....

....main difference between desktop RAM and GDDR5 in particular, is that DDR uses a single write clock (transferring data at the both the highest and lowest point of each clock cycle-hence Double Data Rate) per cycle whereas GDDR5 uses two write clocks per cycle (enabling one data request+one data receive per clock cycle)- this translates as GDDR5 having twice the effective memory bandwidth that DDR.

As example:

Desktop RAM frequency =800MHz x 2 (Double Data Rate -DDR)= DDR3-1600

GDDR5 = 1375MHz (HD 6970 clock) x 4 (2 write clocks x DDR) = 5500MHz "effective"

GDDR also operates at a much faster rate at a much lower voltage. Typical destop RAM operates between ~2.2v (DDR2) and a low of ~1.35v (LoVo DDR3) while GDDR5 operates at ~ 0.95-1.05v (again, typically). Latency in GDDR is also lower than it's desktop counterpart.

* ECC memory uses a 72-bit bus. The "extra" 8-bit's provide the error correction facility.

Zecias said:

Benny26 said:

a few weeks to come up with ddr5? where did u ever get that idea?... ddr4 isn't even comercially available yet, itll probably be a while before everyone starts using it.

I wasn't being serious Zecias, i was being sarcastic. I'll make an edit to my post.

Cota said:

The problem is that the past generation of DDR is always stocked on the market, making it slow for the new generation to flow and replace it

I agree entirely.

srry its hard to read sarcasm >.>

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

May we present the new and improved post # 2...!

I aint even got to DDR3 yet!...

There can't be any point in buying anything DDR4. I mean, if it's only going to be a few week before DDR5 comes along, might aswell save money and get that.

[Edit]

Alert! Alert! Alert! This post is not to be taken literally. Failure to heed this warning may result in a social breakdown of communication. Thank you. <--(Smile)

[Edit]

In response to "Benny's", attempted (?), "sarcastic" post...... may we present post # 29...!

srry its hard to read sarcasm >.>
Well, it's a tad late to bother or belabor, wouldn't you say? "I mean really", if you didn't get the joke on the first few passes, it's probably better to just go ahead and get ready for the next one. Or perhaps you were being "sarcastic" yourself?

"You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him laugh"...! (Now I'm being sarcastic, if you were wondering).

....main difference between desktop RAM and GDDR5 in particular, is that DDR uses a single write clock (transferring data at the both the highest and lowest point of each clock cycle-hence Double Data Rate) per cycle.

I thought I would add this one paragraph from the Wiki page on "DDR2", by way of explaining the mechanism in which DDR2 has become referred to as, "quad pumped"

"Like all SDRAM implementations, DDR2 stores memory in memory cells that are activated with the use of a clock signal to synchronize their operation with an external data bus. Like DDR before it, the DDR2 I/O buffer transfers data both on the rising and falling edges of the clock signal (a technique called "double pumping" . The key difference between DDR and DDR2 is that for DDR2 the memory cells are clocked at 1 quarter (rather than half) the rate of the bus. This requires a 4-bit-deep prefetch queue, but, without changing the memory cells themselves, DDR2 can effectively operate at twice the bus speed of DDR".

dividebyzero dividebyzero, trainee n00b, said:

..."The key difference between DDR and DDR2 is that for DDR2 the memory cells are clocked at 1 quarter (rather than half) the rate of the bus. This requires a 4-bit-deep prefetch queue, but, without changing the memory cells themselves, DDR2 can effectively operate at twice the bus speed of DDR".

Thanks captain

And just to confuse further; GDDR uses an 8-bit prefetch.

I'm not too sure what kind of answer (or level of answer) Burty was expecting. Explaining in laymans/simple terms tends to raise more questions than it answers (hence my "Jeez, you know how to ask the sticky questions" comment), and a generic "it uses less voltage and runs faster" leaves out a lot of pertinent information.

Guest said:

technology these day move like mathematics logarithm..

Guest said:

Many of these comments are among the funniest things I've seen today, on a Friday too!

(Demi Moore's Law ... hahaha!!!)

Thank you very much, I needed this (tough day)...

-- thanks,

Dave

Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Thanks for clearing that up guys

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