Canonical releases Ubuntu 11.04

By on April 29, 2011, 4:52 PM
Canonical has announced Ubuntu 11.04 (codenamed Natty Narwhal). The company says the new version "continues Ubuntu's proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution." You can download Ubuntu 11.04 directly in three flavors: Ubuntu 32-bit, Ubuntu 64-bit, and Ubuntu Server.

Ubuntu 11.04 introduces a new desktop shell called Unity, which is the culmination of two years' design and engineering effort by Canonical and the Ubuntu community. For PC users, Ubuntu 11.04 supports laptops, desktops, and netbooks, superseding Ubuntu Netbook Edition for all PC netbooks. Ubuntu Server 11.04 makes it easier to provision servers and reduce power consumption while Ubuntu Server 11.04 for UEC and EC2 has a new kernel and improved initialization and configuration options.

Ubuntu 11.04 takes advantage of modern graphics to provide a visually rich interface for the PC. On older computers, Ubuntu will automatically determine if the graphics card supports Unity and will provide a classic experience when Unity will not work. The classic desktop experience is still an option for those who want familiarity or in large desktop deployments where not all can move to Unity immediately.

Ubuntu 11.04 features a configurable launcher on the left-hand side of the screen (regardless if you're on a laptop, desktop, or netbook), allowing the user to choose which applications they want. The new version also moves away from traditional interfaces, embracing search as the best way to find applications and files, which is hosted in the dash. The dash makes files, applications, music, and video all searchable through the same bar.

When searching for applications (by name or by category), users will see the most recently used or installed ones as well as suggestions to download through the Ubuntu Software Centre, which include user reviews and ratings. An open application will be highlighted in the launcher while active, can be locked to the launcher, or will remove itself from the launcher when closed. When searching for files (by file name or by type), the most recent files, downloads, and favorites will be presented. This marks a shift from the traditional "files and folders" approach to organizing files and introduces the search method that Canonical hopes users will find much faster and more efficient (although files and folders can still be accessed in the traditional way).

Here are a few other enhancements: a global menu for most pre-installed apps at the top of the screen, menus are shown only when needed, easier to switch between multiple screens, dozens of handy keyboard shortcuts to navigate quickly through screens and applications, as well as a volume indicator that can adjust the volume, queue, play, switch, and stop music. Last but not least, touch screens are fully supported in Ubuntu 11.04, as are gestures for trigger actions like scrolling, workspace-switching, as well as expanding and contracting screens.

"This release breaks new ground for Ubuntu by offering users a PC experience that is stylish and efficient," Jane Silber, CEO of Canonical, said in a statement. "With this release Ubuntu will recruit an entirely new wave of users to free software. Ubuntu 11.04 is a high watermark for what has been achieved with open-source technologies for the everyday computer user."




User Comments: 23

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Leeky Leeky said:

I'll have to get this downloaded and trialled in VBox. I do have to say though, that I felt the design was far from perfect when used for the previous netbook edition releases. I'd like to see if its improved though.

Doesn't this new Unity release actually fully utilise Wayland instead of x.org as has been the way since year dot.

Will do a new how-to guide when I get my assignments out of the way.

lawfer, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Leeky said:

I'll have to get this downloaded and trialled in VBox. I do have to say though, that I felt the design was far from perfect when used for the previous netbook edition releases. I'd like to see if its improved though.

Doesn't this new Unity release actually fully utilise Wayland instead of x.org as has been the way since year dot.

Will do a new how-to guide when I get my assignments out of the way.

Nah, Unity still uses X.

And I like the UI, but it feels unfinished.

Xclusiveitalian Xclusiveitalian said:

I had the 11.04 beta going, do i have to reinstall the new version or can i update it using update manager?

lawfer, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Xclusiveitalian said:

I had the 11.04 beta going, do i have to reinstall the new version or can i update it using update manager?

Yes, update manager will download the necesary files to update you to the final release. Make sure to update your repositories, just in case (specially if you have custom installations [beta/third-party software]).

Guest said:

I see why no one adopts linux. Just when you get used to it, they completely change it--every 6 months.

Emil said:

Xclusiveitalian said:

I had the 11.04 beta going, do i have to reinstall the new version or can i update it using update manager?

I always recommend a clean install when going from beta to final for an OS.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

OK, it's time for a stupid question, and I'm as good a person as any to ask it..... Does Ubuntu now have native drivers supporting AHCI (SATA). Because last time I tried it, I spent 30 minutes trying (unsuccessfully) to explain to it that I'd like to run my SATA drive as IDE. It just kept asking fo SATA drivers. Huge turn off. Forget which distro though. Maybe it was 7 or 8.

javierkaiser javierkaiser said:

Actually, im using it on a (nvidia) Raid 0, 2 satas, and no problems with sata drivers...

matrix86 matrix86 said:

I'm not a real big fan of linux, but I may actually dual boot with this version on my netbook. Linux has always been a pain for me and never could learn it and adapt to it as fast as I could on Windows. But this one looks like it might be easier to use and fun to play around with.

PinothyJ said:

Guest said:

I see why no one adopts linux. Just when you get used to it, they completely change it--every 6 months.

What's that? A Guest is posting a provocative comment!? NO WAY!

...

Leeky Leeky said:

OK, it's time for a stupid question, and I'm as good a person as any to ask it..... Does Ubuntu now have native drivers supporting AHCI (SATA). Because last time I tried it, I spent 30 minutes trying (unsuccessfully) to explain to it that I'd like to run my SATA drive as IDE. It just kept asking fo SATA drivers. Huge turn off. Forget which distro though. Maybe it was 7 or 8.

You should be good to go Captain.

You could always download Virtualbox, or VMware player or something, and install it as a Guest OS to try it.

Nah, Unity still uses X.

And I like the UI, but it feels unfinished.

Sounds like its pretty much going to behave and act the same as the previous netbook editions did then, just with other optimisations.

I always recommend a clean install when going from beta to final for an OS.

I understand your reasons for suggesting that in the case of Windows, but I'm curious for your reasons for needing to do it in this scenario.

In my opinion all that should be needed to move from beta to official release is:

[code]sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade[/code]

Then a cup of tea while it works away.

ElShotte ElShotte said:

Leeky said:

You should be good to go Captain.

You could always download Virtualbox, or VMware player or something, and install it as a Guest OS to try it.

Am I missing something? Where's the Edit button for the comment? Anyway, what I was going to say is that the easier thing to do, if you have a spare 2Gb or bigger Flash Drive, just use it to do a Live boot. I believe there's guides right on the Ubuntu download page, and it's actually quite simple. Plug the flash in, run the software, select ISO, click Ok then wait.

Leeky Leeky said:

Have sorted it for you.

Thanks for the tip - I am aware of it, I use that exact method to install Linux on systems when required. I tend to trial others in VBox though, as I'm quite happy sticking to Debian (Squeeze) with XFCE as my DE.

Its a good tip for those wishing to try it whilst keeping Windows though!

matrix86 matrix86 said:

ElShotte said:

Am I missing something? Where's the Edit button for the comment?.

In order to use edit, you'll have to access this story from the forums. This keeps those pesky guests from changing what they say just so they'll stop being called stupid from us calling them stupid for the stupid comments they make, lol.

lawfer, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Emil said:

Xclusiveitalian said:

I had the 11.04 beta going, do i have to reinstall the new version or can i update it using update manager?

I always recommend a clean install when going from beta to final for an OS.

That's completely unnecessary on a linux distro. This is not Windows.

Guest said:

"I see why no one adopts linux. Just when you get used to it, they completely change it--every 6 months."

Another reason why no-one adopts Linux: It's sh*t.

neonxy said:

Till the time games depend on direct X, there won't be major Linux adaptation at least not desktop market. It's not fault of Linux, companies like Microsoft wish to monopolize everything. You can't play Blu ray movies in Linux, can't run modern games.

However situation is completely different in server market. Windows is still far behind in stability and scalability. 95% of world's super computers run on Linux, this itself speaks for the scalability and stability of Linux kernel.

Guest said:

NeoNxy.. Ok, First im not going to stay 100% anonymous, but I'm not going to sign up either.

But this is regarding your post about how Linux is more secure and stable then Windows. That is what you call an opinion. BUT, if you want to get into facts, then we can do that as well. The reason people "think" Linux is more secure, is because Linux is NOT targeted NEAR as much as windows is, when it comes to on-board attacks, this may be why people tend to believe that Linux is the superior when it comes to security and stability. Once again, this is also just an opinion. but for someone to take their opinion, and try to factualize it, is completely immature.

Ubuntu is a good Linux distro, but I DO NOT believe that Linux is more secure then windows. Stability? Im not sure, I dont care either. but security, windows. If Linux got attacked 1/3 as much as windows does, then we'd see Linux's TRUE security.. just my 2 cents.

lawfer, TechSpot Paladin, said:

NeoNxy.. Ok, First im not going to stay 100% anonymous, but I'm not going to sign up either.

But this is regarding your post about how Linux is more secure and stable then Windows. That is what you call an opinion. BUT, if you want to get into facts, then we can do that as well. The reason people "think" Linux is more secure, is because Linux is NOT targeted NEAR as much as windows is, when it comes to on-board attacks, this may be why people tend to believe that Linux is the superior when it comes to security and stability. Once again, this is also just an opinion. but for someone to take their opinion, and try to factualize it, is completely immature.

Ubuntu is a good Linux distro, but I DO NOT believe that Linux is more secure then windows. Stability? Im not sure, I dont care either. but security, windows. If Linux got attacked 1/3 as much as windows does, then we'd see Linux's TRUE security.. just my 2 cents.

If Linux was attacked as many times as Windows, it would still be superior regarding security. If you couldn't tell by the definition of linux, it is open-source code. That alone makes the response time to any malicious threat, I would dare to say, 10 times higher than an OS such as Windows.

Jurassic4096 said:

95% of world's super computers run on Linux, this itself speaks for the scalability and stability of Linux kernel.

No, that just tells you Linux is good for something as long as it doesn't have to cater to thousands of people running millions of different hardware configurations. Keep Linux on servers. Leave the rest to the pros.

Guest said:

Leave Linux on the SERVER and the REST to the "Pros"? That is a little backwards....

Leeky Leeky said:

No, that just tells you Linux is good for something as long as it doesn't have to cater to thousands of people running millions of different hardware configurations. Keep Linux on servers. Leave the rest to the pros.

Server specifications vary as much as, if not more than specfications of home computers.

Linux is everything you just said it wasn't.

Guest said:

I was unable to connect to wireless. The video shows like, " click wireless button and it will show you various routers". No matter what i did, i couldn't get any networks. May be it was due to my wireless card which may not be supported. Am new to linux, so i am unable to experience the power of Linux without internet. Sad.

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