Weekend tech reading: Google Music to launch sans Sony, Warner

By on November 13, 2011, 1:53 PM

Google Music launching without Sony and Warner Google sent invitations today for a press event, to be held in Los Angeles, where the company is expected to add downloads to its cloud music service, as well as unveil social-networking features. CNET has learned that Google has signed a licensing agreement for the new service with Universal Music Group but does not have deals in place with Sony Music Entertainment or Warner Music Group... CNET

Dell says Thai floods will impact disk drive supply Leading personal computer maker Dell said Friday that flooding in Thailand is likely to tighten supplies of the all-important hard disk drives used in its computers. "Dell is continuing to actively monitor the Thailand flooding situation, and while we expect hard disk drivesupply to be limited in the next several weeks, we are working closely with our HDD suppliers to mitigate any customer impact"... AFP

Super-powerful X-ray beam will probe the center of the Earth It is much easier to get to Mars than to get deep inside this planet, so for all our knowledge about things like earthquakes and the magnetic field, Earth’s interior is actually very poorly understood. To study how metals interact at the prodigious pressures within, scientists squeeze small particles in the lab and heat them up -- but this is an inexact science and difficult to do. Popular Science

US court verdict 'huge blow' to privacy, says fomer WikiLeaks aide Icelandic MP and former WikiLeaks volunteer Birgitta Jonsdottir has slammed the decision by US courts to open her Twitter account to the US authorities and is taking her case to the Council of Europe. On Thursday a US judge ruled Twitter must release the details of her account and those of two other Twitter users linked to WikiLeaks. The Guardian

"Shoot the Pirate" copyright campaign descends into real violence While observers criticize Western companies for their 'aggressive' anti-piracy campaigns, elements of the creative industries in South Africa are taking things to a whole new level. With their "Shoot the Pirate" campaign, music and TV industry players have taken to the streets with threats to "fight violence with violence." TorrentFreak

Judge orders divorcing couple to swap Facebook And dating site passwords Most divorces require spouses to part with some of their property, but in Connecticut, a soon-to-be ex-husband and wife are being asked to give up more than just investments, cars, TVs, kids, and pets. They have to hand over their social networking passwords. Forbes

Skyrim reaches nearly 250,000 concurrent Steam users on day one, topples MW3 Skyrim’s kind of a big deal. Seeing as you’ve probably heard it mentioned more than the word “the” in the past 24 hours, I doubt that comes as a Tamriel-sized surprise to you. That said, at this point, even my cold, jaded soul can’t help but say damn. PC Gamer

Why PROTECT IP/SOPA is the exact wrong approach to dealing with infringement online As the various "battle lines" are supposedly being drawn between the entertainment industry and the tech industry in the fight over PROTECT IP/SOPA, it's worth pointing out that nothing is further from the truth. Techdirt

New, faster Firefox Beta is ready for testing A new Firefox Beta (v9.0) for Windows, Mac and Linux is now available for download and testing. This beta enhances JavaScript performance and adds developer tools that make Web browsing much faster. What’s new in Firefox Beta... Mozilla

Judge tosses "iBrick" lawsuit over iOS 4 slowing iPhone 3G A California woman seeking a class action lawsuit against Apple after being dissatisfied with her iPhone 3G following an update to iOS 4 has had her case thrown out by the judge evaluating the complaint. AppleInsider

Apple's iOS 5.0.1 does *not* fix battery problems Or at least many users are claiming that Apple’s update to iOS5 does not fix problems with battery life. Indeed, some are claiming that it has actually made matters worse... Forbes




User Comments: 4

Got something to say? Post a comment
Guest said:

lol.

quote:

"US court verdict 'huge blow' to privacy, says fomer WikiLeaks aide Icelandic MP and former WikiLeaks volunteer Birgitta Jonsdottir has slammed the decision by US courts to open her Twitter account to the US authorities and is taking her case to the Council of Europe. On Thursday a US judge ruled Twitter must release the details of her account and those of two other Twitter users linked to WikiLeaks."

some informations are for the consumption of government authorized agencies only but wikileaks exposed it to the general public.

now it's the time of the government to do the opposite the legal way and the wikileaks volunteer objects.

for crying out loud.

'nuff said.

Wendig0 Wendig0, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I've been testing the Firefox beta for the last couple days, and so far I haven't seen any improvement over 7.0. It has crashed on me 5 or 6 times already, and isn't noticeably faster. I've been filling out feedback forms all weekend.

gwailo247, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Guest said:

some informations are for the consumption of government authorized agencies only but wikileaks exposed it to the general public.

now it's the time of the government to do the opposite the legal way and the wikileaks volunteer objects.

for crying out loud.

'nuff said.

Yeah, I liked this one:

"We have to have the same civil rights online as we have offline. Imagine if the US authorities wanted to do a house search at my home, go through my private papers. There would be a hell of a fight. It's absolutely unacceptable."

But I guess if one of the Wikileaks volunteers became disillusioned with their cause and hacked into her account and took that information and gave it to the gov't, it would be ok?

Like you said, they are respecting her civil rights and following due process of the law. Its not as if they sent in some SEALs into her house, and held up a gun to her head and forced her to type in her twitter password, or they hacked into her computer (or Twitter) and stole it.

TJGeezer said:

Seems to me all these objections to the Wikileaks position boil down to: If the government does it, and all forms are followed, it's okay. If the government stays within the law there are no grounds to object.

Excuse me? That's the reasoning of the Supreme Court when it turned down compelling new evidence and allowed Texas to execute an arguably innocent man. All the forms were followed. You really think that makes it okay?

I guess it would sound more convincing if I'd seen any evidence at all that Wikileaks had done actual harm to the U.S. government or its military that the two haven't already trumped many times over. The only harm Wikileaks has done is embarrass various bureaucrats, politicians and halfwit generals by shining a light on their attitudes and activities. No strategic damage ever shown. Ever.

Anyone who can watch the corporate-owned U.S. government and the war industry-owned Pentagon, and think a repressive response by them is fine if they follow the legal forms, has entirely too much confidence in the U.S. Congress to make laws in the interests of the public.

I guess 9% of the American public have similar confidence in Congress, according to recent approval ratings Nancy Pelosi quoted on TV. She seemed quite proud of the 40% approval her party achieved when in control. A 40+% high. Right. Yippee.

Go head Wikileaks, shine all the light you can into their dark corners. Embarrass the heck out of them. And protect your sources all you can.

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